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143 found
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  1. On the Megarians of Metaphysics IX 3.Santiago Chame - forthcoming - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie.
    In this paper, I compare the Megarian thesis ofMetaphysicsIX 3 with other sources on the Megarians in order to clarify two questions: that of the unity and nature of the so-called Megarian school and that of Aristotle’s broader argument in IX 3. I first review the disputed issue of the status of the Megarian school and then examine two hypotheses regarding the identity behind Aristotle’s allusion in IX 3. Third, I explore the connection between Megarianism and Plato’sEuthydemus, a task that (...)
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  2. Socratis et Socraticorum Reliquiae Source.Emidio Spinelli, Thomas Bénatouïl, Riccardo Chiaradonna, Tiziano Dorandi, Anna Maria Ioppolo, Carlos Lévy & Mauro Tulli (eds.) - forthcoming
    Socratis et Socraticorum Reliquiae Source presents the transcription of the collection of testimonies about Socrates and Socratics (Socratis et Socraticorum Reliquiae) originally edited by G. Giannantoni. -/- The site enable users to access texts, exploit resources, and perform queries. Notes, additional information and a legenda for a better access to the texts are also available. -/- The publication is peer-reviewed and aspire to meet the highest quality standards. The content of the site and its internet addresses are stable and can (...)
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  3. The dialectical method in Xenophon and Antisthenes.Santiago Chame - 2023 - In Claudia Mársico & Daniel Rossi Nunes Lopes (eds.), Xenophon, the Philosopher. Argumentation and Ethics. Berlin: Peter Lang. pp. 231-248.
    Xenophon’s conception of the dialectical method shares many similarities with Antisthenes’ point of view regarding the relation between language and reality. The key element supporting this reading is the parallel between Xenophon’s method of dialegein kata genē and Antisthenes’ method of episkepsis tōn onomatōn. In this paper, I claim that a correct understanding of both methods yields a clear structural proximity between the two Socratics on the issue of dialectics. Although they present some significant differences, which I will also explore, (...)
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  4. Aspásia de Mileto e o exercício da excelência [Aspasia of Miletus and the exercise of excellence].Beatriz Saar - 2023 - Prometheus 43:47-66.
    Aspásia de Mileto (470?-400?) é uma figura cuja história nos é nebulosa e ao mesmo tempo muito clara. Nebulosa pois, como sugere Marta Andrade (2022, p. 24), trata-se de uma existência, como muitas outras, cuja memória a posteridade raramente se ocupou ou simplesmente esqueceu. Mas também clara pois Aspásia possui uma persona constituída no que chamamos de "tradição". A amante de Péricles. A professora de Sócrates. A esposa de Lísicles. Sua figura é frequentemente resgatada à sombra das figuras masculinas com (...)
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  5. Socrates and the Socratic Philosophies: Selected Papers from Socratica IV.Claudia Marsico (ed.) - 2022 - Baden-Baden: Academia Verlag.
    Wie kann man sich dem sokratischen Rätsel stellen? Dieses Buch bietet einige Anhaltspunkte, um das Problem von Sokrates und den sokratischen Philosophien aus verschiedenen Perspektiven anzugehen. Behandelt werden Sokrates und das sokratische Umfeld; das Problem des Sokrates bei Platon; die sokratischen Linien (darunter Antisthenes, die Megariker, die Kyrenaiker und Aischines) und die sokratische Rezeption bei Aristoteles, der epikureischen Tradition und Cicero. Mit Beiträgen von William Altman, Fiorenza Bevilacqua, Esteban Bieda, Aldo Brancacci, Michele Corradi, Dino De Santis, Mariana Gardella, Stefania Giombini, (...)
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  6. Dialettica, Virtù e Felicità nei Socratici.Santiago Chame - 2021 - Thaumàzein 9 (1):396-415.
  7. El logos propio y el problema de la verdad en Antístenes.Santiago Chame - 2021 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 77 (1):383-410.
    In this paper, I examine Antisthenes’s conception of truth in order to better understand the relation between ontology and language in his thought. I intend to show that it presents a sharp contrast to Plato’s account of the problem of truth, which relies on an affirmative conception of ontology that involves both the concepts of correspondence and of predicative attribution. While for both philosophers the problem of truth is central, Antisthenes develops a peculiar perspective that subverts Plato’s attempt to sort, (...)
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  8. Eudaimonia socratica e cura dell’altro | Socratic Eudaimonia and Care for Others.Santiago Chame, Donald Morrison & Linda Napolitano Valditara (eds.) - 2021
    Special volume of "Thaumàzein - Rivista di Filosofia" dedicated to the theme of Socratic Eudaimonia and care for others. It is a multilingual volume comprising twenty papers divided into six sections with an introduction by Linda Napolitano. Edited by Santiago Chame, Donald Morrison, and Linda Napolitano. -/- Despite the appearances given by certain texts, the moral psychology of Socrates needs not imply selfishness. On the contrary, a close look at passages in Plato and Xenophon (see Plato, Meno 77-78; Protagoras 358; (...)
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  9. Enseñar la sophrosyne: el uso del elenchos del Sócrates de Jenofonte [Traducción de Facundo Bey y Julia Rabanal].Gabriel Danzig - 2021 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 2021 (31):1-39. Translated by Facundo Bey & Julia Rabanal.
    In contrast to the abundance of discussion of Plato’s portrayal of the Socratic elenchos, relatively little work has been done on the elenchos as it appears in Xenophon. The reason is obvious: Xenophon makes much less use of the elenchus than Plato and what he does offer is not as interesting philosophically. Nevertheless, there are good reasons to look more closely at Xenophon’s portrait. It provides a corrective to the excessively intellectualizing portrait of the elenchus found in Plato’s writings, and (...)
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  10. MUTLU ŞEHRİN BAĞLANMAYA KARŞI DURAN BİLGE SAKİNİ.U. Özyıldırım & Mustafa Günay - 2021 - In SİNOP KÜLTÜR VE TURİZM SEMPOZYUMU BİLDİRİLER KİTABI CİLT-I. Ankara, Türkiye:
    Son dönemde yapılan araştırmalarda en mutlu şehir olarak seçilen Sinop’un yüzyıllar öncesinde bir sakini vardı ki insanlık için mutlu olmanın doğru yolunu bulmayı kendine dert edinmişti. Öğretileri Roma İmparatorluğu’nun resmi dini gibi benimsenecek, Marcus Aurelius gibi Roma Krallarının filozofu olmaktan gurur duyacağı Stoa Okulunun ve Dünya Hükümdarı Büyük İskender’in büyük övgüsüne mazhar olmuş, Sinoplu Diogenes.
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  11. Ways of life as modes of presentation.Michael-John Turp & Brylea Hollinshead - 2021 - Human Affairs 31 (4):429-438.
    Books and journal articles have become the dominant modes of presentation in contemporary philosophy. This historically contingent paradigm prioritises textual expression and assumes a distinction between philosophical practice and its presented product. Using Socrates and Diogenes as exemplars, we challenge the presumed supremacy of the text and defend the importance of ways of life as modes of practiced presentation. We argue that text cannot capture the embodied activity of philosophy without remainder, and is therefore limited and incomplete. In particular, we (...)
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  12. Arcesilaus and the Ontology of Stoic Cognition.Charles E. Snyder - 2020 - Review of Metaphysics 73 (March):455-493.
    The focus of this paper is the dispute between the Academic Arcesilaus of Pitane (ca. 316–240 BC) and the philosophy of Zeno of Citium. Scholars typically claim that Arcesilaus set out to attack Zeno’s epistemology or theory of knowledge. The framework of epistemology prevails in the modern reconstruction of Arcesilaus’s arguments. Proponents of this framework usually contend that the epistemic possibility of Stoic “cognition” or “apprehension” (κατάληψις) is the principal aim of Arcesilaus’s attack. The aim of this article is to (...)
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  13. WIELAND AS A TRANSLATOR - (K.) Roettig Wielands Sokratische Übersetzungen. (Wieland im Kontext, Oßmannstedter Studien 1.) Pp. viii + 382. Heidelberg: Universitätsverlag Winter, 2017. Cased, €48. ISBN: 978-3-8253-6542-4. [REVIEW]Rebecca Laemmle - 2020 - The Classical Review 70 (2):514-516.
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  14. Epicureans, Earlier Atomists, and Cyrenaics.Stefano Maso - 2020 - In Kelly Arenson (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Hellenistic Philosophy. New York, Stati Uniti: pp. 58-70.
    The theory developed by Leucippus (5th cent. BCE), Democritus (470/460-380 BCE), and later Epicurus (341-271/270 BCE) and his school is commonly defined as atomistic materialism. According to this theory, matter is the fundamental principle of existent and ever-evolving reality, and it is constituted of atoms. But whereas for the first atomists atoms were not so much a substance (ousia) as an ideal form (idea) through which they could explain sensible bodies and their movement, with Epicurus atoms effectively turned into a (...)
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  15. People in a Siege: On the Relationship between Ethics and Epistemology in Cyrenaic Philosophy.Antonio Pedro Mesquita - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (2):307-328.
  16. Mársico, Claudia. Filósofos socráticos. Testimonios y fragmentos II. Antístenes, Fedón, Esquines y Simón. Introducción, traducción y notas. [REVIEW]Francisco Villar - 2020 - Argos 2 (38):94-98.
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  17. Socratic and Platonic Political Philosophy: Practicing a Politics of Reading. By Christopher P.Long. Pp. xxi, 205, Cambridge University Press, 2014, £60.00/$90.00. [REVIEW]Robin Waterfield - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (1):142-142.
  18. The Politics of Socratic Humor, written by John Lombardini.John Zumbrunnen - 2020 - Polis 37 (2):356-358.
  19. Cicero Reading the Cyrenaics on the Anticipation of Future Harms.Katharine R. O'Reilly - 2019 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (2):431-443.
    A common reading of the Cyrenaics is that they are a school of extreme hedonist presentists, recognising only the pleasure of the present moment, and advising against turning our attention to past or future pleasure or pain. Yet they have some strange advice which tells followers to anticipate future harms in order to lessen the unexpectedness of them when they occur. It’s a puzzle, then, how they can consistently hold the attitude they do to our concern with our present selves, (...)
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  20. Plato's Statesman and Xenophon's Cyrus.Carol Atack - 2018 - In Gabriel Danzig, Donald Morrison & David M. Johnson (eds.), Plato and Xenophon: comparative studies. Leiden, Netherlands: Brill. pp. 510-543.
    This paper examines the relationship between the political thought of Plato and Xenophon, by positioning both as post-Socratic political theorists. It seeks to show that Xenophon and Plato examine similar themes and participate in a shared discourse in their later political thought, and in particular, that Plato is responding to Xenophon, with the Statesman exploring similar themes to Xenophon’s Cyropaedia, which itself responds to sections of Plato’s Republic. Both writers explore the themes of the shepherd king and the kairos as (...)
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  21. Diogenes the Cynic on Law and World Citizenship.Christopher Paone - 2018 - Polis 35 (2):478–498.
    Against the traditional reading of Cynic cosmopolitanism, this essay advances the thesis that Diogenes’ world citizenship is a positive claim supported by philosophical argument and philosophical example. Evidence in favor of this thesis is a new interpretation of Diogenes’ syllogistic argument concerning law (nomos) (D.L. 6.72). Important to the argument are an understanding of Diogenes’ philanthropic character and his moral imperative to ‘re-stamp the currency’. Whereas Socrates understands his care as attached specially to Athens, Diogenes’ philosophical mission and form of (...)
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  22. Sinoplu Filozof Diogenes (Diyojen) ve Etik Anlayışı.Alper Bilgehan Yardımcı - 2018 - Berikan Yayınevi.
    Diogenes of Sinope, bilinen adıyla Diogenes ya da Sinoplu Diyojen’e yönelik yapılan bu çalışmada amacım, Dioegenes’in yaşamının, felsefi duruşunun ve benimsediği etik kuralların kapsamlı ve belgelenmiş bir şekilde sunulmasıdır. Diogenes’in hayatını ve öğretilerini güvenilir bir şekilde aktarmak aşırı derecede zordur, çünkü diğer antik filozoflardan ayrı olarak, onun yaşamına ilişkin güvenilir kaynaklar bulmak oldukça sınırlıdır. Ayrıca, fıçının içinde yaşayan bir Kinikli’ye yönelik ortaya konulmuş birçok kurmaca anekdot ile uğraşılması gerekmektedir. Güvenilir bilginin azlığı ve belgesiz atıfların yarattığı zorluklara rağmen, yine de birçok (...)
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  23. The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists, written by James Warren. [REVIEW]Emily Austin - 2017 - Polis 34 (1):168-171.
  24. La ontología negativa en las filosofías socráticas y sus proyecciones interepocales.Santiago Chame - 2017 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 27:39-69.
    RESUMEN En este trabajo nos proponemos analizar la ontología de distintas corrientes socráticas con un enfoque por Zonas de tensión dialógica. Antístenes y los megáricos Euclides y Estilpón despliegan modelos de negatividad que rechazan la afirmación de principios ontológicos capaces de sustentar lo real y su expresión en el lenguaje. Estas propuestas teóricas no solo ofrecen una perspectiva alternativa a la platónico-aristotélica, sino que influyen de manera decisiva, por medio de la interacción e influencia recíproca, en la construcción de las (...)
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  25. The Birth of Hedonism: The Cyrenaic Philosophers and Pleasure as a Way of Life. [REVIEW]Tim O’Keefe - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (1):185-192.
  26. The Annicerean Cyrenaics on Friendship and Habitual Good Will.Tim O’Keefe - 2017 - Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 62 (3):305-318.
    Unlike mainstream Cyrenaics, the Annicereans deny that friendship is chosen only because of its usefulness. Instead, the wise person cares for her friend and endures pains for him because of her goodwill and love. Nonetheless, the Annicereans maintain that your own pleasure is the telos and that a friend’s happiness isn’t intrinsically choiceworthy. Their position appears internally inconsistent or to attribute doublethink to the wise person. But we can avoid these problems. We have good textual grounds to attribute to the (...)
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  27. The Logical Structure of Socrates’ Expert-Analogies.Petter Sandstad - 2017 - In Alessandro Stavru & Christopher Moore (eds.), Socrates and the Socratic Dialogue. Leiden: Brill. pp. 319-335.
    Socrates’ expert-analogies is frequent both in Plato’s dialogues and in the Socratic writings of Xenophon, and is also ascribed to Socrates by Aristotle and Aeschines. Socrates makes an analogy from a non-controversial expert (or an expertise) like the cobbler or ship-captain, to another (often controversial) expert (or expertise) like the statesman. This paper defends an interpretation of the expert-analogy as valid deductions. It infers from one type of expert (such as the ship-captain) to another type of expert (such as the (...)
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  28. Epicurean versus Cyrenaic Happiness.David Sedley - 2017 - In Richard Seaford, John Wilkins & Matthew Wright (eds.), Selfhood and the Soul: Essays on Ancient Thought and Literature in Honour of Christopher Gill. Oxfird: Oxford University Press. pp. 89-106.
    Eudaimonia, happiness, is a property of a whole life, not of some portion of it. What can this mean for hedonists? For Epicurus, it is made possible by the mind’s capacity to enjoy one’s whole life from any temporal viewpoint: to relive past pleasures and enjoy future ones in anticipation, importantly including confidence in a serene closure. Enjoying your life is like enjoying a day as a whole, not least its sunset. Although pleasure is increased by greater duration (contrary to (...)
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  29. Antisthenes and the beginning of the socratic movement. S. Prince antisthenes of athens. Texts, translations, and commentary. Pp. X + 774. Ann Arbor: University of michigan press, 2015. Cased, us$130. Isbn: 978-0-472-11934-9. [REVIEW]Vladislav Suvák - 2017 - The Classical Review 67 (1):20-22.
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  30. The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists by James Warren.Giulia Bonasio - 2016 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):556-557.
  31. Gardella, Mariana. Las críticas de los filósofos megáricos a la ontología platónica. Buenos Aires: Rhesis. 144 pp. [REVIEW]Santiago Chame - 2016 - Ideas Y Valores 65 (160):256-260.
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  32. Susan H. Prince, Antisthenes of Athens: Texts, Translations, and Commentary. Reviewed by. [REVIEW]Sean McConnell - 2016 - Philosophy in Review 36 (5):218-219.
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  33. Hedonistic Theories of Well-Being in Antiquity.Tim O'Keefe - 2016 - In Guy Fletcher (ed.), Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Well-Being.
    Focuses on the theories of the Epicureans and Cyrenaics in light of Plato's and Aristotle's criticisms of hedonism. Closes with a brief discussion of how the Pyrrhonian skeptical conception of the telos compares to the Epicureans'.
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  34. Cyrenaics and Epicureans on Pleasure and the Good Life: The Original Debate and Its Later Revivals.Voula Tsouna - 2016 - In Sharon Weisser & Naly Thaler (eds.), Strategies of Polemics in Greek and Roman Philosophy. Brill. pp. 113-149.
  35. Could the Cyrenaics Live an Ethical Life? Jules Vuillemin’s Answer (and a Further Suggestion).Ugo Zilioli - 2016 - Philosophia Scientiae 20:29-48.
    Cet article s’attache à comprendre si les cyrénaïques étaient susceptibles d’être attaqués moyennant l’objection d’inactivité et, si oui, comment ils auraient pu essayer d’y répondre et quel type de vision morale ils auraient pu essayer de défendre. En traitant de ces questions, j’évaluerai la légitimité de l’interprétation du scepticisme cyrénaïque offerte par Jules Vuillemin. Je confirmerai ainsi la plausibilité de son interprétation et développerai en même temps l’exploration de la nature et de la portée de la philosophie cyrénaïque.
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  36. Désirs naturels et artificiels chez Diogène et Épicure.Simon-Pierre Chevarie-Cossette - 2015 - In Daoust Marc-Kevin (ed.), Le désir et la philosophie. Les Cahiers d'Ithaque. pp. 147.
    This article contrasts Epicurus's and Diogenes the Cynic's respective views on acceptable desires. I emphasize their appeals to nature to legitimize or de-legitimize certain types of desires.
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  37. Tonneau percé, tonneau habité - Calliclès et Diogène : les leçons rivales de la nature.Simon-Pierre Chevarie-Cossette - 2015 - Philosophie Antique 15:149-178.
    Comme de nombreux penseurs antiques avant et après eux et contrairement à Socrate, Calliclès et Diogène ont déclaré avoir fondé leur éthique sur l’observation de la nature. Et pourtant, les deux discours normatifs qui sont tirés d’une nature que l’on pourrait a priori croire être la même sont on ne peut plus opposés. Calliclès croit que l’homme est appelé à dominer autrui ; Diogène pense plutôt qu’il doit se dominer lui-même ; le premier est un hédoniste débridé, le second croit (...)
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  38. Aristippus and Xenophon as Plato’s contemporary literary rivals and the role of gymnastikè (γυμναστική).Konstantinos Gkaleas - 2015 - E-Logos Electronic Journal for Philosophy 22:4-11.
    Plato was a Socrates’ friend and disciple, but he wasn’t the only one. No doubt, Socrates had many followers, however, the majority of their work is lost. Was there any antagonism among his followers? Who succeeded in interpreting Socrates? Who could be considered as his successor? Of course, we don’t know if these questions emerged after the death of Socrates, but the Greek doxography suggests that there was a literary rivalry. As we underlined earlier, most unfortunately, we can’t examine all (...)
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  39. Warren, The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists. [REVIEW]Tim O'Keefe - 2015 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 1.
  40. The Sources and Scope of Cyrenaic Scepticism.Tim O'Keefe - 2015 - In Ugo Zilioli (ed.), From the Socratics to the Socratic Schools: Classical Ethics, Metaphysics and Epistemology. Routledge. pp. 99-113.
    This paper focuses on two questions: (I) why do the Cyrenaics deny that we can gain knowledge concerning "external things," and (II) how wide-ranging is this denial? On the first question, I argue that the Cyrenaics are skeptical because of their contrast between the indubitable grasp we have of own affections, versus the inaccessibility of external things that cause these affections. Furthermore, this inaccessibility is due to our cognitive and perceptual limitations--it is an epistemological doctrine rooted in their psychology--and not (...)
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  41. The Circle of Socrates: Readings in First-Generation Socratics [Review]. [REVIEW]Geoffrey Bagwell - 2014 - Teaching Philosophy 37 (2):253-257.
  42. "The Circle of Socrates: Readings in First-Generation Socratics," ed. and trans. George Boys-Stones and Christopher Rowe.Geoffrey Bagwell - 2014 - Teaching Philosophy 37 (2):253-257.
  43. CHAPTER 2. Cyrene and the Cyrenaics: A Historical and Biographical Overview.Kurt Lampe - 2014 - In The Birth of Hedonism: The Cyrenaic Philosophers and Pleasure as a Way of Life. Princeton University Press. pp. 12-25.
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  44. The Birth of Hedonism: The Cyrenaic Philosophers and Pleasure as a Way of Life.Kurt Lampe - 2014 - Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
    According to Xenophon, Socrates tried to persuade his associate Aristippus to moderate his excessive indulgence in wine, women, and food, arguing that only hard work can bring happiness. Aristippus wasn’t convinced. Instead, he and his followers espoused the most radical form of hedonism in ancient Western philosophy. Before the rise of the better known but comparatively ascetic Epicureans, the Cyrenaics pursued a way of life in which moments of pleasure, particularly bodily pleasure, held the highest value. In The Birth of (...)
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  45. The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists.James Warren - 2014 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Human lives are full of pleasures and pains. And humans are creatures that are able to think: to learn, understand, remember and recall, plan and anticipate. Ancient philosophers were interested in both of these facts and, what is more, were interested in how these two facts are related to one another. There appear to be, after all, pleasures and pains associated with learning and inquiring, recollecting and anticipating. We enjoy finding something out. We are pained to discover that a belief (...)
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  46. Cynics.Eric Brown - 2013 - In James Warren & Frisbee Sheffield (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Ancient Philosophy. London, UK: Routledge. pp. 399-408.
    This overview attempts to explain how we can come to an account of Cynicism and what that account should look like. My account suggests that Cynics are identified by living like Diogenes of Sinope, and that Diogenes' way of life is characterized by distinctive twists on three Socratic commitments. The three Socratic commitments are that success in life depends on excellence of the soul; that this excellence and success are a special achievement, requiring hard work; and that this work requires (...)
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  47. Donald R. Morrison (Hg.), The Cambridge Companion to Socrates.Rafael Ferber & Matthias Vonarburg - 2013 - Philosophisches Jahrbuch 120 (1):211-213.
    Book review of: Donald R. Morrison (Hg.), The Cambridge Companion to Socrates, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 2010.
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  48. Ugo Zilioli, The Cyrenaics. [REVIEW]Tim O'Keefe - 2013 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 1:0-0.
    Argues that many of Zilioli's main contentions are mistaken--in particular, his contention that the Cyrenaics' skepticism is based upon an ambitious metaphysical thesis of indeterminacy.
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  49. Cyrenaics.Tim O'Keefe - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Brief overview of the ethics of the Cyrenaics.
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  50. Epicureans and Cyrenaics on pleasure as a pathos.James Warren - 2013 - In S. Marchand & F. Verde (eds.), Épicurisme et Scepticisme. pp. 127-44.
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