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  1. Spinoza et l'Autonomie du Corps Complexe : Une Approche Systémique.Soltani Lakhdhar - 2015 - Review of Philosophical Studies 49 (3480):1-18.
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  2. The Metaphysics of the Material World: Suárez, Descartes, Spinoza.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2019 - New York: Oxford University Press.
  3. Baruch Spinoza e il principio d'inerzia.Enrico Giannetto - 2018 - In Di stelle, atomi e poemi. Verso la physis. Aracne editrice.
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  4. Cours de philosophie biologique et cognitiviste: Spinoza et la biologie actuelle.Henri Atlan - 2018 - Paris: Odile Jacob.
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  5. Ration and activity : Spinoza's biologising of the mind in an Aristotelian key.Heidi M. Ravven - 2018 - In Beth Lord (ed.), Spinoza’s Philosophy of Ratio. Edinburgh University Press. pp. 33-45.
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  6. Reason and body in Spinoza's Metaphysics.Michael LeBuffe - 2018 - In Beth Lord (ed.), Spinoza’s Philosophy of Ratio. Edinburgh University Press. pp. 19-32.
  7. Knowing mind through knowing body : Spinoza on causal knowledge of the self and the external world.Daniel Garber - 2020 - In Dominik Perler & Sebastian Bender (eds.), Causation and Cognition in Early Modern Philosophy. Routledge.
  8. La multitud en Spinoza: de la física a la política.Gonzalo Ricci Cernadas - 2022 - [Buenos Aires]: RAGIF Ediciones.
  9. Tad S chmaltz, The metaphysics of the material world. Suárez, Descartes, Spinoza, Oxford-New York, Oxford University Press, 2020, xvii -291 p. [REVIEW]Jean-Pascal Anfray - 2022 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 115 (3):433-436.
  10. Davidson and Spinoza: Mind, Matter and Morality.Floris van der Burg - 2007 - Routledge.
    Baruch Spinoza a Dutch rationalist philosopher of the 17th century and Donald Davidson one of the most distinguished contemporary American analytic philosophers, are two thinkers not usually analysed in conjunction with each other in the philosophical literature yet there are remarkable parallels in their thought. In this book Floris van der Burg identifies topics of comparison in the areas of ontology, epistemology, philosophy of mind and philosophy of language and, after explaining the theory of each philosopher, examines the parallel themes (...)
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  11. We Still Do Not Know What a Body Can Do: Rereading Deleuze's Spinozist Ethology Toward a Non-Ontological Interpretation of Transcendental Empiricism.Kyle Novak - 2021 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 25 (2):75-97.
    Throughout much of his career, Deleuze repeats a problem he attributes to Spinoza: “we do not even know what a body can do.” The problem is closely associated with Deleuze’s parallelist reading of Spinoza and what he calls ethology. In this article, I argue that Deleuze takes ethology to be a new model for philosophy which he intends to replace ontology. I ground my claim in Deleuze’s suggestion that Spinoza offers philosophers the means of thinking “with AND rather than thinking (...)
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  12. Book Review: The body in Spinoza and Nietzsche by Razvan Ioan, London, Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, 251 pp., 53.49€ (paper back), ISBN: 978-3-030-20987-2. [REVIEW]James S. Pearson - forthcoming - Global Intellectual History.
  13. A Baconian historiola mentis in Spinoza’s Method.Omar Del Nonno - 2021 - Epistemology and Philosophy of Science 58 (3):188-205.
    Bacon’s influence on Spinoza’s thought is controversial, since this latter seems to underestimate the role of experience in achieving true knowledge. In this paper, I will investigate Spinoza’s reference in Letter 37** to a historiola mentis (little history of mind) a la Bacon as an empirical-historical method to distinguish between different kinds of perceptions. My aim is to explain why Spinoza considers Bacon’s little history of mind a useful tool to proceed towards the knowledge of the excellent things [praestantissimae res]. (...)
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  14. Goethe, Maimon, and Spinoza's Third Kind of Cognition.Jason Yonover - 2018 - Goethe Yearbook 1 (25).
    The relationship between Goethe and Salomon Maimon has only been touched on once in the literature, and further clarification of the link between them remains a desideratum. Below I propose that the way to grasp their seeing eye to eye is through Spinoza, and specifically Spinoza's notion of scientia intuitiva. Initially I provide some context in order to illustrate what makes Maimon's role here rather unique. Then I sketch the relationship Maimon and Goethe had both to Spinoza and each other (...)
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  15. Naturalistic Explanation in Spinoza's Ethics: Being Mind-Full of Nature.Harvey Shoolman - 2019 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
    Spinoza’s naturalism is unique. It explains conscious mind, physical behavior, and scientific, cultural, social and political phenomena by recourse to the deductive relation of causes to effects as expressed by Nature itself. This book provides an innovative and original interpretation of the way in which Spinoza achieved this unique vision.
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  16. The Physics of Spinoza’s Ethics.David R. Lachterman - 1977 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 8 (3):71-111.
  17. The Use and Non-Use of Physics in Spinoza’s Ethics.R. F. Hassing - 1980 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 11 (2):41-70.
  18. Spinoza’s Idea of the Body.Carroll R. Bowman - 1971 - Idealistic Studies 1 (3):258-268.
    The philosophy of Spinoza can hardly be said to have been in the fore-front of recent developments in the philosophy of mind. Notwithstanding, Stuart Hampshire has put himself on record as saying “that in the philosophy of mind he [Spinoza] is nearer to the truth at certain points than any other philosopher ever has been.” The purpose of this paper is to get even nearer the truth with Spinoza’s leading. The idea of the body is, however, a confused idea; so (...)
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  19. Extending Spinoza… For the Love of God!: Spinoza, Lévinas, and the Inadequacy of the Body.F. Scott Scribner - 2002 - International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (2):151-160.
    In his Ethics, Spinoza maintains that God’s essence is expressed as both thought and extension. Despite this claim, however, Spinoza’s very definition of truth, understood as adequation, would seem to reduce the aspect of extension to an exclusively intellectual paradigm. I question the extent to which a body remains a body throughout the Ethics in the transition from the first knowledge of the imagination to the highest know ledge of adequate ideas. As a way to think beyond the totality of (...)
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  20. The Ontology of Determination: From Descartes to Spinoza.Andrea Sangiacomo - 2015 - Science in Context 28 (4):515-543.
    This paper argues that Spinoza's notions of “conatus” and “power of acting” are derived by means of generalization from the notions of “force of motion” and “force of determination” that Spinoza discussed in his Principles of Cartesian Philosophy to account for interactions among bodies on the basis of their degrees of contrariety. I argue that in the Ethics, Spinoza's ontology entails that interactions must always be accounted for in terms of degrees of “agreement or disagreement in nature” among interacting things. (...)
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  21. Spinoza on the Ideality of Time.Geoffrey Gorham - 2013 - Idealistic Studies 43 (1-2):27-40.
    When McTaggart puts Spinoza on his short list of philosophers who considered time unreal, he is falling in line with a reading of Spinoza’s philosophy of time advanced by contemporaneous British Idealists and by Hegel. The idealists understood that there is much at stake concerning the ontological status of Spinozistic time. If time is essential to motion then temporal idealism entails that nearly everything—apart from God conceived sub specie aeternitatis—is imaginary. I argue that although time is indeed ‘imaginary’—in a sense (...)
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  22. Spinoza on Extension.Alison Peterman - 2015 - Philosophers' Imprint 15.
    This paper argues that Spinoza does not take extension in space to be a fundamental property of physical things. This means that when Spinoza calls either substance or a mode “an Extended thing”, he does not mean that it is a thing extended in three dimensions. The argument proceeds by showing, first, that Spinoza does not associate extension in space with substance, and second, that finite bodies, or physical things, are not understood through the intellect when they are conceived as (...)
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  23. Spinoza's Conception of the Physical World.Jesse A. Greene - 1983 - Dissertation, The University of Rochester
    Spinoza accepted from the world view of early modern science the significance of mathematics as the language of physical nature, but he resisted the trend within the scientific world view toward mechanism, corpuscularism and dualism. ;The Cartesian analysis of matter led to the concept of Extension as the 'dimensionality' of space. For Spinoza, mere 'dimensionality' is nothing but an abstraction; and Extension is instead defined as an indivisible power of Substance. Where Cartesian physics can be shown to lack any principle (...)
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  24. Marjorie Grene and Debra Nails, eds., Spinoza and the Sciences. [REVIEW]James Morrison - 1987 - Philosophy in Review 7:495-496.
  25. Zur geschichtlichen Bedeutung der Naturphilosophie Spinozas.A. Hoffmann - 1905 - Philosophical Review 14:515.
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  26. Spinoza on Physical Science.Alison Peterman - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (3):214-223.
    In this paper, I discuss Spinoza on the proper methods and content of physical science. I start by showing how Spinoza's epistemology leads him to a kind of pessimism about the prospects of empirical and mathematical methods in natural philosophy. While they are useful for life, they do not tell us about nature, as Spinoza puts it, “as it is in itself.” At the same time, Spinoza seems to allow that we have some knowledge of physical things and their behavior. (...)
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  27. Marjorie Grene and Debra Nails, eds., Spinoza and the Sciences Reviewed by.James C. Morrison - 1987 - Philosophy in Review 7 (12):495-496.
  28. Spinoza and Cartesian Mechanics.André Lecrivain - 1986 - In Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails (eds.), Spinoza and the Sciences. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 15--60.
  29. Spinoza in the Century of Science.Nancy Maull - 1986 - In Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails (eds.), Spinoza and the Sciences. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 3--13.
  30. Einstein and Spinoza.Michel Paty - 1986 - In Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails (eds.), Spinoza and the Sciences. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 267--302.
  31. Spinoza and the Rise of Modern Science in the Netherlands.Heine Siebrand - 1986 - In Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails (eds.), Spinoza and the Sciences. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 61--91.
  32. Parallelism and complementarity: The psycho-physical problem in Spinoza and in the succession of Niels Bohr.Hans Jonas - 1986 - In Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails (eds.), Spinoza and the Sciences. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 237--247.
  33. Annotated Bibliography of Spinoza and the Sciences.Debra Nails - 1986 - In Marjorie G. Grene & Debra Nails (eds.), Spinoza and the Sciences. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 305--314.
  34. „Axioms in Spinoza's science and philosophy of science “.Wim Klever - 1986 - Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 2:171-195.
  35. The motion of the projectile-Elucidation of spinoza's physics.Wim Klever - 1993 - Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 9:335-340.
  36. Spinoza's Library: The Mathematical and Scientific Works.Henri Krop - 2013 - Intellectual History Review 23 (1):25-43.
  37. Albert Einstein i jego związki z filozofią Spinozy.S. J. Lisiak - 2012 - Filo-Sofija 12 (17).
    ALBERT EINSTEIN’S CONNECTIONS WITH SPINOZA’S PHILOSOPHY The paper aims to analyze the influence of Baruch Spinoza’s philosophy on Albert Einstein’s work, in particular his physics. Einstein was a man of genius personality of contemporary physics, but we can see him as a prominent philosopher, too. He studied the philosophical works of Kant, Leibniz, Hume and other modern philosophers. But his most preferred thinker was Baruch Spinoza. Einstein knew very well Spinoza’s main book, Ethics. He accepted Spinoza’s concepts of human being (...)
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  38. Nieuwe argumenten tegen de toeschrijving Van het auteurschap Van de „stelkonstige reeckening Van den regenboog” en „reeckening Van kanssen” aan Spinoza.W. N. A. Klever - 1985 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 47 (3):493 - 502.
    An accurate analysis of the text shows that the small treatises have a logical structure and a style which is in all aspects unspinozistic. The main points of difference are : a formalistic interpretation of mathematics‚ the opposition between mathematics and physics‚ slavish cartesianism‚ the presence of numerous pleonasms‚ carelessness of expression‚ parade of learning‚ prolixity‚ attention for irrelevant qualities of authors quoted‚ educational purpose. Together with De Vet’s demonstration that the author of SRR and RK is still alive in (...)
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  39. Zwaarte: Een polemiek in de zeventiende eeuw.W. N. A. Klever - 1990 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 52 (2):280 - 314.
    Gravity was a major theme in the seventeenth century scientific discussion. Trendsetters in the renewal of natural science were Galilei and Descartes. The first required a unified theory of all phenomena of gravity ; the second provided one with his vortex-hypothesis, which explained gravity by the mechanical push of subtile bodies of the vortex. This conception was tested and generally followed by Christiaan Huygens, whereas Newton presented the laws of the so called 'attraction' by which he did not at all (...)
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  40. Galileo and Spinoza.F. Buyse (ed.) - 2013 - Routledge.
  41. Galileo and Spinoza: Introduction.Filip Buyse - 2013 - Intellectual History Review 23 (1):1-3.
  42. Le «démasquement» de Descartes par Spinoza dans Les Principia Philosophiae Cartesianae.Filip Buyse - 2012 - Teoria 2:15-43.
    Spinoza’s Principles of Cartesian Philosophy is often presented simply as an interpretation of Descartes’ Principia that does not reveal anything significant about Spinoza’s philosophy and its development. This paper, however, shows that Spinoza altered Descartes’ text in a way congruent with what he would later write in his Theological Political Treatise and the Ethics. More precisely, this paper concentrates not on what Spinoza added to Descartes’ texts but on how he presented them. The paper furthermore examines questions that were obviously (...)
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  43. Spinoza and Galileo Galilei: Adequate Ideas and Intrinsic Qualities of Bodies.Filip A. A. Buyse - 2008 - Historia Philosophica 6:117-127.
  44. Spinoza and Robert Boyle's definition of Mechanical Philosophy.Filip A. A. Buyse - 2010 - Historia Philosophica 8:73-89.
  45. Continuare Spinoza: un'esercitazione filosofica.Massimo Adinolfi - 2012 - [Rome, Italy]: Editori internazionali riuniti.
  46. Spinoza and the Sciences.Ernestine G. E. Van der Wall - 1989 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (3):479-480.
  47. Spinoza’s Physical Philosophy.Jacob Adler - 1996 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 78 (3):253-276.
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  48. Spinoza and the Philosophy of Science: Mathematics, Motion, and Being.Eric Schliesser - 1986, 2002
    This chapter argues that the standard conception of Spinoza as a fellow-travelling mechanical philosopher and proto-scientific naturalist is misleading. It argues, first, that Spinoza’s account of the proper method for the study of nature presented in the Theological-Political Treatise (TTP) points away from the one commonly associated with the mechanical philosophy. Moreover, throughout his works Spinoza’s views on the very possibility of knowledge of nature are decidedly sceptical (as specified below). Third, in the seventeenth-century debates over proper methods in the (...)
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  49. Spinoza contra Curie.Lance Byron Richey - 1993 - Philosophy and Theology 7 (3):323-331.
    I outline Spinoza’s development of the concept of conatus in the Ethics, and attempt to define its role in his metaphysics. In light of this, I critique the theory based on the identification by modern physics of certain radioactive substances, e.g., curium. These substances, I argue, are by definition unstable individuals whose essences include finite durations (half-lives). As such, they are in direct contradiction to Spinoza’s metaphysics. I then advance and critique several defenses Spinoza might make for his theory of (...)
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  50. Book Review:Spinoza and the Sciences Marjorie Grene, Debra Nails. [REVIEW]Don Garrett - 1988 - Philosophy of Science 55 (3):480-.
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