This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related

Contents
350 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 350
  1. Experimental philosophy and the origins of empiricism.Peter R. Anstey & Alberto Vanzo - 2023 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Alberto Vanzo.
    The emergence of experimental philosophy was one of the most significant developments in the early modern period. However, it is often overlooked in modern scholarship, despite being associated with leading figures such as Francis Bacon, Robert Boyle, Isaac Newton, Jean Le Rond d'Alembert, David Hume and Christian Wolff. Ranging from the early Royal Society of London in the seventeenth century to the uptake of experimental philosophy in Paris and Berlin in the eighteenth, this book provides new terms of reference for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2. System, Hypothesis, and Experiments: Pierre-Sylvain Régis.Antonella Del Prete - 2023 - In Andrea Strazzoni & Marco Sgarbi (eds.), Reading Descartes. Consciousness, Body, and Reasoning. Florence: Firenze University Press. pp. 155-168.
    Pierre-Sylvain Régis’s Cartesianism is quite singular in seventeenth-century French philosophy. Though, can we speak of a form of experimental science in Régis’s work? After exploring his notions of ‘system’ and ‘hypothesis’, I will define his position in relation to Claude Perrault, Jacques Rohault, and the Royal Society. I argue, first, that the contrasts which traverse French science are not so much about the use of experiments but about whether or not observational data can be traced back to hypotheses and to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Between Descartes and Boyle: Burchard de Volder’s Experimental Lectures at Leiden, 1676–1678.Andrea Strazzoni - 2023 - In Davide Cellamare & Mattia Mantovani (eds.), Descartes in the classroom: teaching Cartesian philosophy in the early modern age. Boston: Brill. pp. 174-198.
    In this chapter I provide a reconstruction of the contents of the lectures provided by Burchard de Volder by means of experiments at Leiden, in the years 1676–1678, as well as of the natural-philosophical interpretation he provided of the experimental evidences he gained. Such lectures, mostly based on the experiments described by Boyle, served De Volder to teach natural-philosophical ideas which he borrowed from Descartes, and which he re-interpreted in the light of Archimedes’s hydrostatics.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Primary and Secondary Qualities in Early Modern Philosophy.Martha Bolton - 2022 - The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  5. Essence, Experiment, and Underdetermination in the Spinoza-Boyle Correspondence.Stephen Harrop - 2022 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 12 (2):447-484.
    I examine the (mediated) correspondence between Spinoza and Robert Boyle concerning the latter’s account of fluidity and his experiments on reconstitution of niter in the light of the epistemology and doctrine of method contained in the Treatise on the Emendation of the Intellect. I argue that both the Treatise and the correspondence reveal that for Spinoza, the proper method of science is not experimental, and that he accepted a powerful under-determination thesis. I argue that, in contrast to modern versions, Spinoza’s (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Of Clocks and Kings: Physics, Metaphysics, and the Role of God in Clarke’s Worldview.Lukas Wolf - 2022 - Dissertation, University of Groningen
    In this dissertation I examine how the English philosopher-theologian Samuel Clarke (1675--1729) attempted to reasonableness of Christianity and its compatibility with the new natural philosophy. In reaction to what he perceived as the problematic excesses of mechanical philosophy, with its looming threat of atheism, Clarke developed a series of arguments against atheism which aimed to show the shortcomings of a purely material or mechanical explanation of the universe, and demonstrate the overall `reasonability' of the Christian religion. Clarke aimed to demonstrate (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Animism and Natural Teleology from Avicenna to Boyle.Jeff Kochan - 2021 - Science in Context 34 (1):1-23.
    Historians have claimed that the two closely related concepts of animism and natural teleology were both decisively rejected in the Scientific Revolution. They tout Robert Boyle as an early modern warden against pre-modern animism. Discussing Avicenna, Aquinas, and Buridan, as well as Renaissance psychology, I instead suggest that teleology went through a slow and uneven process of rationalization. As Neoplatonic theology gained influence over Aristotelian natural philosophy, the meaning of animism likewise grew obscure. Boyle, as some historians have shown, exemplifies (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  8. Animism, Aristotelianism, and the Legacy of William Gilbert’s De Magnete.Jeff Kochan - 2021 - Perspectives on Science 29 (2):157-188.
    William Gilbert’s 1600 book, De magnete, greatly influenced early modern natural philosophy. The book describes an impressive array of physical experiments, but it also advances a metaphysical view at odds with the soon to emerge mechanical philosophy. That view was animism. I distinguish two kinds of animism – Aristotelian and Platonic – and argue that Gilbert was an Aristotelian animist. Taking Robert Boyle as an example, I then show that early modern arguments against animism were often effective only against Platonic (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  9. Locke on Scientific Methodology.Huaping Lu-Adler - 2021 - In Jessica Gordon-Roth & Shelley Weinberg (eds.), The Lockean Mind. New York, NY: Routledge. pp. 277-89.
    This chapter brings some much-needed conceptual clarity to the debate about Locke’s scientific methodology. Instead of having to choose between the method of hypothesis and that of natural history (as most interpreters have thought), he would resist prescribing a single method for natural sciences in general. Following Francis Bacon and Robert Boyle, Locke separates medicine and natural philosophy (physics), so that they call for completely different methods. While a natural philosopher relies on “speculative” (causal-theoretical) hypotheses together with natural-history making to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Experiment, Speculation, and Religion in Early Modern Philosophy ed. by Alberto Vanzo and Peter R. Anstey.Marcus P. Adams - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (4):817-818.
    This edited volume will be of interest to specialists in the history of early modern philosophy and in the history and philosophy of science. It contains ten chapters related to the themes of experimental philosophy, speculative philosophy, and the relationships of both to religion. Most of the book considers these themes in the thought of six early modern philosophers, with a chapter for each of the following: Bacon, Boyle, Cavendish, Hobbes, Locke, and Newton. The remaining chapters focus upon these themes (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. The Chemical Philosophy of Robert Boyle: Mechanicism, Chymical Atoms, and Emergence.Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino - 2020 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    This book examines the way in which Robert Boyle seeks to accommodate his complex chemical philosophy within the framework of a mechanistic theory of matter. More specifically, the book proposes that Boyle regards chemical qualities as properties that emerged from the mechanistic structure of chymical atoms. Within Boyle’s chemical ontology, chymical atoms are structured concretions of particles that Boyle regards as chemically elementary entities, that is, as chemical wholes that resist experimental analysis. Although this interpretation of Boyle’s chemical philosophy has (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Margaret Cavendish and Early Modern Scientific Experimentalism: ‘Boys that play with watery bubbles or fling dust into each other’s eyes, or make a hobbyhorse of snow’”.Marcy P. Lascano - 2020 - In Routledge Handbook of Feminist Philosophy of Science. New York, NY, USA: pp. 28-40.
    In the seventeenth century the new science was introduced through the works of Bacon, Hooke, Boyle, Power, and others. The advocates of the new science promised to divulge the inner workings of nature and to help man overcome his painful fallen state by means of controlling nature. The new sciences of mechanism and corpuscularism were to be based on objective experiments that would reveal the secret inner natures of minerals, vegetables, animals, the sun, moon, and stars. These experiments were done (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  13. Cavendish and Boyle on Colour and Experimental Philosophy.Keith Allen - 2019 - In Alberto Vanzo & Peter R. Anstey (eds.), Experiment, Speculation and Religion in Early Modern Philosophy. New York: Routledge.
    Margaret Cavendish was a contemporary critic of the mechanistic theories of matter that came to dominate seventeenth-century thought and the proponent of a distinctive form of non-mechanistic materialism. Colour was a central issue both to the mechanistic theories of matter that Cavendish opposed and to the non-mechanistic alternative that she defended. This chapter considers the form of colour realism that Cavendish developed to complement her non-mechanistic materialism, and uses her criticisms of contemporary views of colour to try to better understand (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  14. Robert Boyle and the Intelligibility of the Corpuscular Philosophy.Peter R. Anstey - 2019 - In Peter R. Anstey & Alberto Vanzo (eds.), Experiment, Speculation and Religion in Early Modern Philosophy. New York: Routledge.
    Early modern experimental philosophers were opposed to speculation, and yet many endorsed speculative theories. This chapter gives a partial explanation of why this is so, using Robert Boyle’s acceptance and promotion of the corpuscular philosophy as a case study. It argues that, in addition to furnishing experimental evidence for the corpuscular hypothesis in his Forms and Qualities, Boyle attempted to establish its epistemic superiority over other speculative theories on the grounds that it is founded upon superior principles. In his ‘Excellency (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15. Boyle, Spinoza and Glauber: on the philosophical redintegration of saltpeter—a reply to Antonio Clericuzio.Filip A. A. Buyse - 2019 - Foundations of Chemistry 22 (1):59-76.
    The so-called ‘redintegration experiment’ is traditionally at the center of the comments on the supposed Boyle/Spinoza controversy. A. Clericuzio influentially argued in his publications that, in De nitro, Boyle accounted for the ‘redintegration’ of saltpeter on the grounds of the chemical properties of corpuscles and “did not make any attempt to deduce them from mechanical principles”. By way of contrast, this paper argues that with his De nitro Boyle wanted to illustrate and promote his new corpuscular or mechanical philosophy, and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16. The rise of cryptographic metaphors in Boyle and their use for the mechanical philosophy.Dana Matthiessen - 2019 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 73:8-21.
    This paper tracks the development of Boyle’s conception of the natural world in terms of the popular “book of nature” trope. Boyle initially spoke of the creatures and phenomena of nature in a spiritual and moral register, as emblems of divine purpose, but gradually shifted from this ideographic view to an alphabetical account, which at times became posed in explicitly cryptographic terms. I explain this transition toward cryptographic metaphors in terms of Boyle’s social and intellectual milieu and their concordance with (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17. Burchard de Volder and the Age of the Scientific Revolution.Andrea Strazzoni - 2019 - Cham: Springer Verlag.
    This monograph details the entire scientific thought of an influential natural philosopher whose contributions, unfortunately, have become obscured by the pages of history. Readers will discover an important thinker: Burchard de Volder. He was instrumental in founding the first experimental cabinet at a European University in 1675. The author goes beyond the familiar image of De Volder as a forerunner of Newtonianism in Continental Europe. He consults neglected materials, including handwritten sources, and takes into account new historiographical categories. His investigation (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. 6. Bridging scientia and experience: the last evolution of Cartesian foundationalism.Andrea Strazzoni - 2018 - In Dutch Cartesianism and the Birth of Philosophy of Science: From Regius to ‘s Gravesande. Berlin-Boston: De Gruyter. pp. 126-170.
    The sixth chapter focuses on the evolution of Cartesianism in the last quarter of the seventeenth century in Leiden and Amsterdam, against the background of the emergence of alternative views in natural philosophy capable of replacing it as a dominant paradigm, namely, the experimental philosophy of Robert Boyle and the mathematical-experimental approach of Huygens and Newton. The last evolution of Cartesianism is reconstructed in this chapter by considering the ‘Cartesian empiricism’ of Burchard de Volder, and the reflections on the language (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Natural Philosophy, Deduction, and Geometry in the Hobbes-Boyle Debate.Marcus P. Adams - 2017 - Hobbes Studies 30 (1):83-107.
    This paper examines Hobbes’s criticisms of Robert Boyle’s air-pump experiments in light of Hobbes’s account in _De Corpore_ and _De Homine_ of the relationship of natural philosophy to geometry. I argue that Hobbes’s criticisms rely upon his understanding of what counts as “true physics.” Instead of seeing Hobbes as defending natural philosophy as “a causal enterprise … [that] as such, secured total and irrevocable assent,” 1 I argue that, in his disagreement with Boyle, Hobbes relied upon his understanding of natural (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20. Baconianism.Andrea Strazzoni - 2017 - Encyclopedia of Renaissance Philosophy.
    The philosophy of Francis Bacon was interpreted in various ways in the seventeenth century. In England, his utopian project and natural history became the basis for the projects of religious pacification, pedagogical reformation, and scientific cooperation of Hartlib, Comenius and Charleton. In the hands of Evelyn, Wilkins, and Wren, moreover, Bacon’s ideal of cooperative science engendered the birth of the Royal Society, and his natural history guided the experimental activities of Boyle and Hooke. In France and the Netherlands, attention was (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Early Modern Experimental Philosophy.Peter R. Anstey & Alberto Vanzo - 2016 - In Justin Sytsma & Wesley Buckwalter (eds.), A Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Malden, MA: Wiley. pp. 87-102.
    In the mid-seventeenth century a movement of self-styled experimental philosophers emerged in Britain. Originating in the discipline of natural philosophy amongst Fellows of the fledgling Royal Society of London, it soon spread to medicine and by the eighteenth century had impacted moral and political philosophy and even aesthetics. Early modern experimental philosophers gave epistemic priority to observation and experiment over theorising and speculation. They decried the use of hypotheses and system-building without recourse to experiment and, in some quarters, developed a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  22. Restoration commerce and the instruments of trust.Matthew Day - 2016 - History of the Human Sciences 29 (1):3-26.
    Although the theological elements of Robert Boyle’s mechanical philosophy have received careful scrutiny, his reflections on economic issues have largely been overlooked. This article takes a small step towards redressing this state of affairs. Rather than argue that Boyle – like John Locke or David Hume – was as interested in political economy as he was in discovering the nature of Nature, the article treats him as a point of entry for considering how early-modern England negotiated the revolutionary cultural and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Mechanical Reconfigurable Microstrip Antenna.Alsharif Fawzy, Safi Safi, AbouFoul Tamer, Abu Nasr Mustafa & Abu Naser Samy - 2016 - International Journal of Microwave and Optical Technology 11 (3):153--160.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. “Experimental Philosophy”: Invention and Rebirth of a Seventeenth-Century Concept.Mordechai Feingold - 2016 - Early Science and Medicine 21 (1):1-28.
  25. Michael Hunter. Boyle Studies: Aspects of the Life and Thought of Robert Boyle . xiv + 244 pp., illus., apps., index. Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate, 2015. £70. [REVIEW]Salvatore Ricciardo - 2016 - Isis 107 (1):180-181.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Experiment and Speculation in Seventeenth-Century Italy: The Case of Geminiano Montanari.Alberto Vanzo - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 56:52-61.
    This paper reconstructs the natural philosophical method of Geminiano Montanari, one of the most prominent Italian natural philosophers of the late seventeenth century. Montanari’s views are used as a case study to assess recent claims concerning early modern experimental philosophy. Having presented the distinctive tenets of seventeenth-century experimental philosophers, I argue that Montanari adheres to them explicitly, thoroughly, and consistently. The study of Montanari’s views supports three claims. First, experimental philosophy was not an exclusively British phenomenon. Second, in spite of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Experimental pedagogy and the eclipse of Robert Boyle in England.Peter R. Anstey - 2015 - Intellectual History Review 25 (1):115-131.
  28. The Distinction between Primary Properties and Secondary Qualities in Galileo's Natural Philosophy.F. Buyse - 2015 - Cahiers du Séminaire Québécois En Philosophie Moderne / Working Papers of the Quebec Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy 1:20-45.
    In Il Saggiatore (1623), Galileo makes a strict distinction between primary and secondary qualities. Although this distinction continues to be debated in philosophical literature up to this very day, Galileo's views on the matter, as well as their impact on his contemporaries and other philosophers, have yet to be sufficiently documented. The present paper helps to clear up Galileo's ideas on the subject by avoiding some of the misunderstandings that have arisen due to faulty translations of his work. In particular, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29. Robert Boyle’s mechanical account of hydrostatics and pneumatics: fluidity, the spring of the air and their relationship to the concept of pressure.Alan Chalmers - 2015 - Archive for History of Exact Sciences 69 (5):429-454.
    This article in an attempt to identify the precise way in which Robert Boyle provided a mechanical account of the features that distinguish liquids and air from solids and from each other. In his pneumatics, Boyle articulated his notion of the ‘spring’ of the air for that purpose. Pressure appeared there only in a common, rather than in a technical, sense. It was when he turned to hydrostatics that Boyle found the need to introduce a technical sense of pressure to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Robert Boyle and seventeenth-century chemistry: a second look: Marie Boas: Robert Boyle and seventeenth-century chemistry. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015, £18.99, US$ 28.99 PB.Antonio Clericuzio - 2015 - Metascience 25 (1):103-110.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31. Eksperymentalny styl Roberta Boyle’a a Nowy Eksperymentalizm Iana Hackinga. Porównawcze studium filozoficzno-metodologiczne.Radosław Kazibut - 2015 - Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia 10 (3).
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. From Aristotle’s Teleology to Darwin’s Genealogy: The Stamp of Inutility, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015 (pdf: Contents, Introduction).Marco Solinas - 2015 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Starting with Aristotle and moving on to Darwin, Marco Solinas outlines the basic steps from the birth, establishment and later rebirth of the traditional view of living beings, and its overturning by evolutionary revolution. The classic framework devised by Aristotle was still dominant in the 17th Century world of Galileo, Harvey and Ray, and remained hegemonic until the time of Lamarck and Cuvier in the 19th Century. Darwin's breakthrough thus takes on the dimensions of an abandonment of the traditional finalistic (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Robert Boyle.Peter R. Anstey & J. J. Macintosh - 2014 - In Edward Zalta (ed.), The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Fall 2010 Edition). Stanford University: Metaphysics Research Lab, CSLI. pp. 1-39.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  34. Introduction to Newton and Empiricism.Zvi Biener & Eric Schliesser - 2014 - In Zvi Biener & Eric Schliesser (eds.), Newton and Empiricism. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 1-15.
    The introduction considers the state of scholarship on empiricism as a philosophical and historical category, particularly as it pertains to experimental philosophy. It concludes that empiricism properly understood is a rich category encompassing epistemic, semantic, methodological, experimental, and moral elements. Its richness makes it a suitable lens through which to account for actual historical complexity. The introduction relates the category to the work of Sir Isaac Newton, who influenced all of empiricism’s elements.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  35. Ruardus Andala e la nuova filosofia.Stefano Caroti - 2014 - In Stefano Caroti & Alberto Siclari (eds.), Filosofia e religione. Studi in onore di Fabio Rossi. Parma: E-theca OnLineOpenAccess Edizioni. pp. 236-257.
    In assuming his post of Professor of Philosophy at the University of Franeker, Ruardus Andala expounded in his Oratio inauguralis de physicae praestantia, utilitate et iucunditate (1701) his aim to replace Scholastic-Aristotelian philosophy with more recent philosophical and scientific theories as the rational foundation of theology. In this paper, Andala’s program is reconstructed by taking into account his later works, where he abandoned his former predilection for Jean Leclerc’s Physica (1696), replacing it with René Descartes’s Principia philosophiae (1644), complemented with (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. The Experimentalist as Humanist: Robert Boyle on the History of Philosophy.Dmitri Levitin - 2014 - Annals of Science 71 (2):149-182.
    SummaryHistorians of science have neglected early modern natural philosophers' varied attitudes to the history of philosophy, often preferring to use loose labels such as ‘Epicureanism’ to describe the survival of ancient doctrines. This is methodologically inappropriate: reifying such philosophical movements tells us little about the complex ways in which early modern natural philosophers approached the history of their own discipline. As this article shows, a central figure of early modern natural philosophy, Robert Boyle, invested great intellectual energy into his depiction (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  37. Kant and the Problem of Form: Theories of Generation, Theories of Mind.Jennifer Mensch - 2014 - Estudos Kantianos 2 (2):241-264.
  38. Margaret Cavendish and the Royal Society.Emma Wilkins - 2014 - Notes and Records: The Royal Society Journal of the History of Science 68 (3):245-260.
    It is often claimed that Margaret Cavendish was an anti-experimentalist who was deeply hostile to the activities of the early Royal Society—particularly in relation to Robert Hooke's experiments with microscopes. Some scholars have argued that her views were odd or even childish, while others have claimed that they were shaped by her gender-based status as a scientific ‘outsider’. In this paper I examine Cavendish's views in contemporary context, arguing that her relationship with the Royal Society was more nuanced than previous (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39. The theory of material qualities.Peter R. Anstey - 2013 - In The Oxford handbook of British philosophy in the seventeenth century. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press. pp. 240.
    This chapter examines the main theories of material qualities developed by leading British philosophers during the seventeenth century, describes the taxonomy of qualities during this period, and analyzes the epistemological and metaphysical theses that influenced the development of the theory of material qualities in Great Britain. It also considers the relevant works of Thomas Hobbes, Walter Charleton, Robert Boyle, John Locke, and Isaac Newton.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. The Relevance of Boyle's Chemical Philosophy for Contemporary Philosophy of Chemistry.Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino - 2013 - In Jean-Pierre Llored (ed.), The Philosophy of Chemistry: Practices, Methodologies, and Concepts.
  41. Spinoza, Boyle, Galileo : Was Spinoza a Strict Mechanical Philosopher?Filip Buyse - 2013 - Intellectual History Review 23 (1):45-64.
  42. Spinoza, Boyle, Galileo: Was Spinoza a Strict Mechanical Philosopher?Filip Buyse - 2013 - Intellectual History Review 23 (1):45-64.
  43. The Debate about methodus medendi during the Second Half of the Seventeenth Century in England.Claire Crignon - 2013 - Early Science and Medicine 18 (4-5):339-359.
    Following a recent trend in the field of the history of philosophy and medicine, this paper stresses the necessity of recognizing empiricism’s patent indebtedness to the sciences of the body. While the tribute paid to the Hippocratic method of observation in the work of Thomas Sydenham is well known, it seems necessary to take into account a trend more critical of ancient medicine developed by followers of chemical medicine who considered the doctrine of elements and humours to be a typical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Regimens of the Mind: Boyle, Locke, and the Early Modern Cultura Animi Tradition. [REVIEW]Michael Hunter - 2013 - Isis 104:160-161.
  45. Sorana Corneanu. Regimens of the Mind: Boyle, Locke and the Early Modern Cultura Animi Tradition. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2011. Pp. ix+229. $50.00. [REVIEW]Jan-Erik Jones - 2013 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (2):371-374.
  46. Sorana Corneanu, Regimens of the Mind: Boyle, Locke, and the Early Modern Cultura Animi Tradition (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012), pp. ix + 308, bibl., index, $ 50.00 (cloth), ISBN 978 0 226 11639 6. [REVIEW]Dmitri Levitin - 2013 - Early Science and Medicine 18 (3):317-318.
  47. Regimens of the Mind: Boyle, Locke, and the Early Modern Cultura Animi Tradition (review).J. J. MacIntosh - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (1):127-128.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. The ontological function of first-order and second-order corpuscles in the chemical philosophy of Robert Boyle: the redintegration of potassium nitrate.Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino - 2012 - Foundations of Chemistry 14 (3):221-234.
    Although Boyle has been regarded as a champion of the seventeenth century Cartesian mechanical philosophy, I defend the position that Boyle’s views conciliate between a strictly mechanistic conception of fundamental matter and a non-reductionist conception of chemical qualities. In particular, I argue that this conciliation is evident in Boyle’s ontological distinction between fundamental corpuscles endowed with mechanistic properties and higher-level corpuscular concretions endowed with chemical properties. Some of these points have already been acknowledged by contemporary scholars, and I actively engage (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  49. Boyle’s teleological mechanism and the myth of immanent teleology.Laurence Carlin - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (1):54-63.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  50. Intermediate causes and explanations: The key to understanding the scientific revolution.Alan Chalmers - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (4):551-562.
    It is instructive to view the scientific revolution from the point of view of Robert Boyle’s distinction between intermediate and ultimate causes. From this point of view, the scientific revolution involved the identification of intermediate causes and their investigation by way of experiment as opposed to the specification of ultimate causes of the kind involved in the corpuscular matter theories of the mechanical philosophers. The merits of this point of view are explored in this paper by focussing on the hydrostatics (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
1 — 50 / 350