Results for 'Connie T. Wolfe'

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  1.  94
    Contingencies of self-worth.Jennifer Crocker & Connie T. Wolfe - 2001 - Psychological Review 108 (3):593-623.
  2.  7
    Anne Michaels and the Affirmation of Being in the Poetics of Suffering and Trauma.Connie T. Braun - 2010 - Renascence 62 (2):157-173.
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  3.  12
    Charles T. Wolfe;, Ofer Gal . The Body as Object and Instrument of Knowledge: Embodied Empiricism in Early Modern Science. x + 349 pp., illus., bibls., index. Dordrecht: Springer, 2010. $189. [REVIEW]Ian Stewart - 2012 - Isis 103 (3):599-600.
  4. Charles T. Wolfe et Ofer Gal éd., The Body as Object and Instrument of Knowledge. Embodied Empiricism in Early Modern Science. [REVIEW]Claire Crignon - 2013 - Astérion 11.
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  5. Charles T. Wolfe.Jean-Philibert Damiron - 2009 - In Neven Leddy & Avi Lifschitz (eds.), Epicurus in the Enlightenment. Voltaire Foundation. pp. 12--69.
  6. Charles T. Wolfe.Alan Thomas - 2011 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 14:261-264.
     
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  7.  39
    Charles T. Wolfe. Materialism: A Historico-Philosophical Introduction. Dordrecht: Springer, 2016. Pp. ix+134. $54.99.Noga Arikha - 2017 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 7 (2):386-391.
  8. Charles T. Wolfe, Materialism: A Historico-Philosophical Introduction. Cham, Heidelberg, New York, Dordrecht, London, Springer, 2016, 139 pp. [REVIEW]Natalia L. Zorrilla - 2016 - Tópicos 31:94-102.
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  9.  12
    Compte rendu de : Charles T. Wolfe and Ofer Gal (eds.), The body as object and instrument of knowledge. Embodied empiricism in early modern science. Dordrecht, Springer, 2010, 349 pages. [REVIEW]Bernard Joly - 2011 - Methodos 11.
    Cet ouvrage collectif, qui résulte en partie des travaux d’un atelier sur l’empirisme incarné dans la science moderne qui s’est tenu à l’université de Sydney en février 2009, rassemble quinze communications regroupées en trois parties : « The Body as Object », « The Body as Instrument », « Embodies Minds ». L’objectif des auteurs est de corriger la conception dominante que se font les historiens des sciences et de la philosophie de l’émergence de la philosophie expérimentale, et de l’empirism..
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  10.  1
    Compte rendu de : Charles T. Wolfe and Ofer Gal (eds.), The body as object and instrument of knowledge. Embodied empiricism in early modern science. [REVIEW]Bernard Joly - 2011 - Methodos 11.
    Cet ouvrage collectif, qui résulte en partie des travaux d’un atelier sur l’empirisme incarné dans la science moderne qui s’est tenu à l’université de Sydney en février 2009, rassemble quinze communications regroupées en trois parties : « The Body as Object », « The Body as Instrument », « Embodies Minds ». L’objectif des auteurs est de corriger la conception dominante que se font les historiens des sciences et de la philosophie de l’émergence de la philosophie expérimentale, et de l’empirism...
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  11.  10
    review of Charles T. Wolfe & Ofer Gal eds., The Body as Object and Instrument of Knowledge. Embodied Empiricism in Early Modern Science. Dordrecht, Springer (Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, vol. XXV), 2010, 349 p., 157,41 euros. [REVIEW]Claire Crignon - 2013 - Astérion 11.
    L’empirisme, comme mode de connaissance mais aussi comme tradition de pensée, a longtemps été négligé, que ce soit en histoire des sciences ou en histoire de la philosophie. Longtemps opposé au rationalisme, l’empirisme fait figure de mode de connaissance rhapsodique et non systématique. Associé au scepticisme, il est considéré comme une forme de renoncement à la connaissance, se contentant de décrire l’apparence des choses quand la véritable .
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  12.  14
    Béatrice Longuenesse, Kant and the capacity to judge. Sensibility and discursivity in the transcendental analytic of the «Critique of pure reason». Transl. from the French by Charles T. Wolfe[REVIEW]André Berten - 2002 - Revue Philosophique De Louvain 100 (4):820-823.
  13. Getting physical: Empiricism’s medical History: Charles T. Wolfe and Ofer Gal : The body as object and instrument of knowledge: Embodied empiricism in early modern science. Dordrecht: Springer, 2010, x+349pp, €139.95 HB. [REVIEW]John Gascoigne - 2011 - Metascience 20 (2):299-301.
    Getting physical: Empiricism’s medical History Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9474-4 Authors John Gascoigne, School of History and Philosophy, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2056, Australia Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  14.  20
    Vitalism and the Scientific Image in Post-Enlightenment Life Science, 1800–2010. Edited by Sebastian Normandin and Charles T. Wolfe. Springer, 2013, 377pp, £117. ISBN: 978-94-007-2445-7. [REVIEW]Adam Ferner - 2014 - Philosophy 89 (3):491-494.
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  15.  20
    Wolf Land.Morten Tønnessen - 2010 - Biosemiotics 3 (3):289-297.
    Wolf land is in the context of the present article to be considered as an ambiguous term referring to “the land of the wolf” from the wolf’s perspective as well as from a human perspective. I start out by presenting the general circumstances of the Scandinavian wolf population, then turn to the Norwegian wolf controversy in particular. The latter half of the article consists of an elucidation of current wolf ecology related to what is here termed wolf land, and a (...)
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  16. Carleton Watkins: The Stanford Albums.Connie Wolf (ed.) - 2014 - Stanford University Press.
    Collects the photographs of Carleton Watkins that contributed to the argument for creating the National Park Service, along with essays that explore the artist and his work providing context and depth to the images.
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  17.  11
    Emergency Nursing, Ebola, and Public Policy: The Contributions of Nursing to the Public Policy Conversation.Lisa Wolf, Connie M. Ulrich & Christine Grady - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (S1):S35-S38.
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  18.  20
    LAT: a T lymphocyte adapter protein that couples the antigen receptor to downstream signaling pathways.Connie L. Sommers, Lawrence E. Samelson & Paul E. Love - 2004 - Bioessays 26 (1):61-67.
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  19.  45
    Philosophy of Biology Before Biology.Cécilia Bognon-Küss & Charles T. Wolfe (eds.) - 2019 - London: Routledge.
    Philosophy of biology before biology -/- Edited by Cécilia Bognon-Küss & Charles T. Wolfe -/- Table of contents -/- Cécilia Bognon-Küss & Charles T. Wolfe. Introduction -/- 1. Cécilia Bognon-Küss & Charles T. Wolfe. The idea of “philosophy of biology before biology”: a methodological provocation -/- Part I. FORM AND DEVELOPMENT -/- 2. Stéphane Schmitt. Buffon’s theories of generation and the changing dialectics of molds and molecules 3. Phillip Sloan. Metaphysics and “Vital” Materialism: The Gabrielle Du Châtelet (...)
  20.  88
    The concept of organism: historical philosophical, scientific perspectives.Phillipe Huneman & Charles T. Wolfe - 2010 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 32 (2-3):147.
    0. Philippe Huneman and Charles T. Wolfe: Introduction 1. Tobias Cheung, “What is an ‘organism’? On the occurrence of a new term and its conceptual transformations 1680-1850” 2. Charles T. Wolfe, “Do organisms have an ontological status?” 3. John Symons, “The individuality of artifacts and organisms” 4. Thomas Pradeu, “What is an organism? An immunological answer” 5. Matteo Mossio & Alvaro Moreno, “Organisational closure in biological organisms” 6. Laura Nuño de la Rosa, “Becoming organisms. The organisation of development (...)
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  21.  33
    Animal Rites: American Culture, the Discourse of Species, and Posthumanist Theory.Cary Wolfe & W. J. T. Mitchell - 2003 - University of Chicago Press.
    In Animal Rites, Cary Wolfe examines contemporary notions of humanism and ethics by reconstructing a little known but crucial underground tradition of theorizing the animal from Wittgenstein, Cavell, and Lyotard to Lévinas, Derrida, ...
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  22.  19
    Moral dilemmas and conflicts concerning patients in a vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome: shared or non-shared decision making? A qualitative study of the professional perspective in two moral case deliberations.Conny A. M. F. H. Span-Sluyter, Jan C. M. Lavrijsen, Evert van Leeuwen & Raymond T. C. M. Koopmans - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):10.
    Patients in a vegetative state/ unresponsive wakefulness syndrome pose ethical dilemmas to those involved. Many conflicts occur between professionals and families of these patients. In the Netherlands physicians are supposed to withdraw life sustaining treatment once recovery is not to be expected. Yet these patients have shown to survive sometimes for decades. The role of the families is thought to be important. The aim of this study was to make an inventory of the professional perspective on conflicts in long-term care (...)
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  23.  17
    Algorithmic management in a work context.Will Sutherland, Eliscia Kinder, Christine T. Wolf, Min Kyung Lee, Gemma Newlands & Mohammad Hossein Jarrahi - 2021 - Big Data and Society 8 (2).
    The rapid development of machine-learning algorithms, which underpin contemporary artificial intelligence systems, has created new opportunities for the automation of work processes and management functions. While algorithmic management has been observed primarily within the platform-mediated gig economy, its transformative reach and consequences are also spreading to more standard work settings. Exploring algorithmic management as a sociotechnical concept, which reflects both technological infrastructures and organizational choices, we discuss how algorithmic management may influence existing power and social structures within organizations. We identify (...)
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  24.  8
    Introduction to the CUCH.Wolf Gross, E. R. Caianiello & T. B. Steel - 1975 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 40 (1):81-83.
  25. Monsters and Philosophy.Charles T. Wolfe (ed.) - 2005 - College Publications.
    Table of contents for MONSTERS AND PHILOSOPHY, edited by Charles T. Wolfe (London 2005) -/- List of Contributors iii Acknowledgments vii List of Abbreviations ix -/- Introduction xi Charles T. Wolfe The Riddle of the Sphinx: Aristotle, Penelope, and 1 Empedocles Johannes Fritsche Science as a Cure for Fear: The Status of Monsters in 21 Lucretius Morgan Meis Nature and its Monsters During the Renaissance: 37 Montaigne and Vanini Tristan Dagron Conjoined Twins and the Limits of our Reason (...)
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  26. Do you know what you are tracking?T. Horowitz, S. Klieger, J. Wolfe, G. Alvarez & D. Fencsik - 2004 - In Robert Schwartz (ed.), Perception. Malden Ma: Blackwell. pp. 125-126.
     
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  27. The self-fashioning of French Newtonianism: J. B. Shank: The Newton Wars and the beginning of the French Enlightenment. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2008, xv+571pp, $55.00 HB.Charles T. Wolfe & David Gilad - 2011 - Metascience 20 (3):573-576.
    The self-fashioning of French Newtonianism Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9511-3 Authors Charles T. Wolfe, Unit for History and Philosophy of Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia David Gilad, Unit for History and Philosophy of Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  28. Vitalism without Metaphysics? Medical Vitalism in the Enlightenment.Charles T. Wolfe - 2008 - Science in Context 21 (4):461-463.
    This is the introduction to a special issue of 'Science in Context' on vitalism that I edited. The contents are: 1. Guido Giglioni — “What Ever Happened to Francis Glisson? Albrecht Haller and the Fate of Eighteenth-Century Irritability” 2. Dominique Boury— “Irritability and Sensibility: Two Key Concepts in Assessing the Medical Doctrines of Haller and Bordeu” 3. Tobias Cheung — “Regulating Agents, Functional Interactions, and Stimulus-Reaction-Schemes: The Concept of “Organism” in the Organic System Theories of Stahl, Bordeu and Barthez” 4. (...)
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  29. Epigenesis as Spinozism in Diderot’s biological project (draft).Charles T. Wolfe - 2014 - In O. Nachtomy J. E. H. Smith (ed.), The Life Sciences in Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 181-201.
    Denis Diderot’s natural philosophy is deeply and centrally ‘biologistic’: as it emerges between the 1740s and 1780s, thus right before the appearance of the term ‘biology’ as a way of designating a unified science of life (McLaughlin), his project is motivated by the desire both to understand the laws governing organic beings and to emphasize, more ‘philosophically’, the uniqueness of organic beings within the physical world as a whole. This is apparent both in the metaphysics of vital matter he puts (...)
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  30. Man Makes Himself.V. Gordon Childe, A. Wolf, H. T. Pledge, George Perazich, Philip M. Field & J. D. Bernal - 1940 - Science and Society 4 (4):461-466.
     
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  31. Do organisms have an ontological status?Charles T. Wolfe - 2010 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 32 (2-3):195-232.
    The category of ‘organism’ has an ambiguous status: is it scientific or is it philosophical? Or, if one looks at it from within the relatively recent field or sub-field of philosophy of biology, is it a central, or at least legitimate category therein, or should it be dispensed with? In any case, it has long served as a kind of scientific “bolstering” for a philosophical train of argument which seeks to refute the “mechanistic” or “reductionist” trend, which has been perceived (...)
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  32.  49
    Stress and multiple memory systems: from 'thinking' to 'doing'.Lars Schwabe & Oliver T. Wolf - 2013 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (2):60-68.
  33. On the role of Newtonian analogies in eighteenth-century life science:Vitalism and provisionally inexplicable explicative devices.Charles T. Wolfe - 2014 - In Zvi Biener & Eric Schliesser (eds.), Newton and Empiricism. Oxford University Press. pp. 223-261.
    Newton’s impact on Enlightenment natural philosophy has been studied at great length, in its experimental, methodological and ideological ramifications. One aspect that has received fairly little attention is the role Newtonian “analogies” played in the formulation of new conceptual schemes in physiology, medicine, and life science as a whole. So-called ‘medical Newtonians’ like Pitcairne and Keill have been studied; but they were engaged in a more literal project of directly transposing, or seeking to transpose, Newtonian laws into quantitative models of (...)
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  34. “Empiricism contra Experiment: Harvey, Locke and the Revisionist View of Experimental Philosophy”.Alan Salter & Charles T. Wolfe - 2009 - Bulletin d'histoire et d'épistémologie des sciences de la vie 16 (2):113-140.
    In this paper we suggest a revisionist perspective on two significant figures in early modern life science and philosophy: William Harvey and John Locke. Harvey, the discoverer of the circulation of the blood, is often named as one of the rare representatives of the ‘life sciences’ who was a major figure in the Scientific Revolution. While this status itself is problematic, we would like to call attention to a different kind of problem: Harvey dislikes abstraction and controlled experiments (aside from (...)
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  35.  42
    The Animal Economy as Object and Program in Montpellier Vitalism.Charles T. Wolfe & Motoichi Terada - 2008 - Science in Context 21 (4):537-579.
    Our aim in this paper is to bring to light the importance of the notion of économie animale in Montpellier vitalism, as a hybrid concept which brings together the structural and functional dimensions of the living body – dimensions which hitherto had primarily been studied according to a mechanistic model, or were discussed within the framework of Stahlian animism. The celebrated image of the bee-swarm expresses this structural-functional understanding of living bodies quite well: “One sees them press against each other, (...)
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  36. Faszinosum 'Klang': Anthropologie-Medialität-kulturelle Praxis.Wolf Gerhard Schmidt (ed.) - 2014 - Boston: De Gruyter.
     
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  37. Holism, organicism and the risk of biochauvinism.Charles T. Wolfe - 2014 - Verifiche: Rivista Trimestrale di Scienze Umane 43 (1-3):39-57.
    In this essay I seek to critically evaluate some forms of holism and organicism in biological thought, as a more deflationary echo to Gilbert and Sarkar's reflection on the need for an 'umbrella' concept to convey the new vitality of holistic concepts in biology (Gilbert and Sarkar 2000). Given that some recent discussions in theoretical biology call for an organism concept (from Moreno and Mossio’s work on organization to Kirschner et al.’s research paper in Cell, 2000, building on chemistry to (...)
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  38. Sensibility as vital force or as property of matter in mid-eighteenth-century debates.Charles T. Wolfe - 2014 - In Henry Martyn Lloyd (ed.), The Discourse of Sensibility: The Knowing Body in the Enlightenment. Springer. pp. 147-170.
    Sensibility, in any of its myriad realms – moral, physical, aesthetic, medical and so on – seems to be a paramount case of a higher-level, intentional property, not a basic property. Diderot famously made the bold and attributive move of postulating that matter itself senses, or that sensibility (perhaps better translated ‘sensitivity’ here) is a general or universal property of matter, even if he at times took a step back from this claim and called it a “supposition.” Crucially, sensibility is (...)
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  39. The organism as ontological go-between. Hybridity, boundaries and degrees of reality in its conceptual history.Charles T. Wolfe - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 1:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.shps.
    The organism is neither a discovery like the circulation of the blood or the glycogenic function of the liver, nor a particular biological theory like epigenesis or preformationism. It is rather a concept which plays a series of roles – sometimes overt, sometimes masked – throughout the history of biology, and frequently in very normative ways, also shifting between the biological and the social. Indeed, it has often been presented as a key-concept in life science and the ‘theorization’ of Life, (...)
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  40.  93
    From substantival to functional vitalism and beyond: animas, organisms and attitudes.Charles T. Wolfe - 2011 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 14:212-235.
    I distinguish between ‘substantival’ and ‘functional’ forms of vitalism in the eighteenth century. Substantival vitalism presupposes the existence of a (substantive) vital force which either plays a causal role in the natural world as studied scientifically, or remains an immaterial, extra-causal entity. Functional vitalism tends to operate ‘post facto’, from the existence of living bodies to the search for explanatory models that will account for their uniquely ‘vital’ properties better than fully mechanistic models can. I discuss representative figures of the (...)
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  41. “The ‘physiology of the understanding’ and the ‘mechanics of the soul’: reflections on some phantom philosophical projects”.Charles T. Wolfe - 2016 - Quaestio 16:3-25.
    In reflecting on the relation between early empiricist conceptions of the mind and more experimentally motivated materialist philosophies of mind in the mid-eighteenth century, I suggest that we take seriously the existence of what I shall call ‘phantom philosophical projects’. A canonical empiricist like Locke goes out of his way to state that their project to investigate and articulate the ‘logic of ideas’ is not a scientific project: “I shall not at present meddle with the Physical consideration of the Mind” (...)
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  42. Vital anti-mathematicism and the ontology of the emerging life sciences: from Mandeville to Diderot.Charles T. Wolfe - 2017 - Synthese:1-22.
    Intellectual history still quite commonly distinguishes between the episode we know as the Scientific Revolution, and its successor era, the Enlightenment, in terms of the calculatory and quantifying zeal of the former—the age of mechanics—and the rather scientifically lackadaisical mood of the latter, more concerned with freedom, public space and aesthetics. It is possible to challenge this distinction in a variety of ways, but the approach I examine here, in which the focus on an emerging scientific field or cluster of (...)
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  43. Materialism and ‘the soft substance of the brain’: Diderot and plasticity.Charles T. Wolfe - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (5):963-982.
    ABSTRACTMaterialism is the view that everything that is real is material or is the product of material processes. It tends to take either a ‘cosmological’ form, as a claim about the ultimate nature of the world, or a more specific ‘psychological’ form, detailing how mental processes are brain processes. I focus on the second, psychological or cerebral form of materialism. In the mid-to-late eighteenth century, the French materialist philosopher Denis Diderot was one of the first to notice that any self-respecting (...)
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  44. Forms of materialist embodiment.Charles T. Wolfe - 2012 - In Matthew Landers & Brian Muñoz (eds.), Anatomy and the Organization of Knowledge, 1500-1850. Pickering & Chatto.
    The materialist approach to the body is often, if not always understood in ‘mechanistic’ terms, as the view in which the properties unique to organic, living embodied agents are reduced to or described in terms of properties that characterize matter as a whole, which allow of mechanistic explanation. Indeed, from Hobbes and Descartes in the 17th century to the popularity of automata such as Vaucanson’s in the 18th century, this vision of things would seem to be correct. In this paper (...)
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  45.  8
    Wolf Lepenies., Melancholy and Society.James T. Knauer - 1994 - International Studies in Philosophy 26 (4):141-142.
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  46. Why was there no controversy over Life in the Scientific Revolution?Charles T. Wolfe - 2010 - In Victor Boantza Marcelo Dascal (ed.), Controversies in the Scientific Revolution. John Benjamins.
    Well prior to the invention of the term ‘biology’ in the early 1800s by Lamarck and Treviranus, and also prior to the appearance of terms such as ‘organism’ under the pen of Leibniz in the early 1700s, the question of ‘Life’, that is, the status of living organisms within the broader physico-mechanical universe, agitated different corners of the European intellectual scene. From modern Epicureanism to medical Newtonianism, from Stahlian animism to the discourse on the ‘animal economy’ in vitalist medicine, models (...)
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  47.  2
    Wolf, Maryanne. Reader, Come Home: The Reading Brain in a Digital World. [REVIEW]Mark T. Johnson - 2021 - Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies 33 (1-2):198-200.
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  48.  30
    Materialism: A Historico-Philosophical Introduction.Charles T. Wolfe - 2015 - Cham: Springer.
    This book provides an overview of key features of (philosophical) materialism, in historical perspective. It is, thus, a study in the history and philosophy of materialism, with a particular focus on the early modern and Enlightenment periods, leading into the 19th and 20th centuries. For it was in the 18th century that the word was first used by a philosopher (La Mettrie) to refer to himself. Prior to that, ‘materialism’ was a pejorative term, used for wicked thinkers, as a near-synonym (...)
  49. Vitalism and the scientific image: an introduction.Sebastian Normandin & Charles T. Wolfe - 2013 - In Sebastian Normandin & Charles T. Wolfe (eds.), Vitalism and the scientific image, 1800-2010. Springer.
    Introduction to edited volume on vitalism and/in the life sciences, 1800-2010.
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  50.  23
    Vital anti-mathematicism and the ontology of the emerging life sciences: from Mandeville to Diderot.Charles T. Wolfe - 2019 - Synthese 196 (9):3633-3654.
    Intellectual history still quite commonly distinguishes between the episode we know as the Scientific Revolution, and its successor era, the Enlightenment, in terms of the calculatory and quantifying zeal of the former—the age of mechanics—and the rather scientifically lackadaisical mood of the latter, more concerned with freedom, public space and aesthetics. It is possible to challenge this distinction in a variety of ways, but the approach I examine here, in which the focus on an emerging scientific field or cluster of (...)
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