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  1. Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire by Sergio Yona.Kate Meng Brassel - 2020 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 113 (2):230-232.
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  2. A New Supplement to Diogenes of Oenoanda’s Fr. 6 Smith: A Case of Epicurean Language Selection.Alberto Corrado - 2020 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 164 (2):269-276.
    This paper intends to offer a new supplement to a corrupt passage of the Epicurean inscription of Oenoanda. Smith, in the lacuna of Fr. 6, uses the phrasal term πρῶτα σώματα to indicate the atoms. The supplement is not satisfying as it is based solely on evidence drawn from non-Epicurean texts and Lucretius, who writes in Latin and is not always reliable for reconstructing the Epicurean terminology. In this article, I will try to demonstrate that πρῶτα σώματα is in fact (...)
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  3. Sergio Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace. The Psychology of Satire. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, 360 Pp.Epicurean Ethics in Horace. The Psychology of Satire. [REVIEW]Michael Erler - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (3):513-518.
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  4. The Ethical Maxims of Democritus of Abdera.Monte Johnson - 2020 - In David Wolfsdorf (ed.), Early Greek Ethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 211-242.
    Democritus of Abdera, best known as a cosmologist and the founder of atomism, wrote more on ethics than anyone before Plato. His work Peri euthumiês (On Contentment) was extremely influential on the later development of teleological and intellectualist ethics, eudaimonism, hedonism, therapeutic ethics, and positive psychology. The loss of his works, however, and the transmission of his fragments in collections of maxims (gnomai), has obscured the extent his contribution to the history of systematic ethics and influence on later philosophy, especially (...)
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  5. Epicureanism, Charvaka and Consumerism: A Search for Philosophy of Happiness.Desh Raj Sirswal - 2020 - Interdisciplinary Studies.
    Epicurus was a Greek philosopher interested in pleasure or pursuit of it more than other ideals. He said, "No pleasure in itself is a bad thing, but the things that produce certain pleasures involve disturbances many times greater than the pleasures themselves." Epicurus tells us that the knowledge of which pleasures are good for us is wisdom. While this sometimes led to a negative view of his philosophy, in many regions of the world today the reality is that his thinking (...)
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  6. About the alleged Florentinian Epicureism of XIII century.José Blanco Jiménez - 2019 - Alpha (Osorno) 49:124-147.
    Resumen: No solo Platón y Aristóteles son recordados en la Firenze comunal. También está Epicuro, que mencionan Dante, Boccaccio y Villani. Pero ¿existió un epicureísmo florentino? En su imaginario viaje de la Commedìa, Dante y Virgilio -con la ayuda divina- logran entrar en la Ciudad de Ditis, donde se encuentran los heréticos. Dentro de sepulcros llenos de fuego, deberían estar los miembros de todas las sectas y también los seguidores de Epicuro, que era conocido a través de Cicerón. En realidad, (...)
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  7. Epicurean Ethics in Horace - Yona Epicurean Ethics in Horace. The Psychology of Satire. Pp. X + 348. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. Cased, £70, Us$90. Isbn: 978-0-19-878655-9. [REVIEW]Jerome Kemp - 2019 - The Classical Review 69 (1):109-111.
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  8. ‘Why is Latin Spectrum a Bad Translation of Epicurus’ ΕΙΔΩΛΟΝ? Cicero and Cassius on a Point of Philosophical Translation’.Sean McConnell - 2019 - Mnemosyne 72 (1):154–162.
  9. Cicero Reading the Cyrenaics on the Anticipation of Future Harms.Katharine R. O'Reilly - 2019 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (2):431-443.
    A common reading of the Cyrenaics is that they are a school of extreme hedonist presentists, recognising only the pleasure of the present moment, and advising against turning our attention to past or future pleasure or pain. Yet they have some strange advice which tells followers to anticipate future harms in order to lessen the unexpectedness of them when they occur. It’s a puzzle, then, how they can consistently hold the attitude they do to our concern with our present selves, (...)
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  10. Jürgen Hammerstaedt, Pierre-Marie Morel, Refik Güremen (Eds.), Diogenes of Oinoanda: Epicureanism and Philosophical Debates / Diogène D’Œnoanda: Épicurisme Et Controverses. [REVIEW]Frederik Bakker - 2018 - Syzetesis 5:113-122.
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  11. The End of Epicurean Infinity: Critical Reflections on the Epicurean Infinite Universe.Frederik Bakker - 2018 - In Frederik Bakker, Delphine Bellis & Carla Rita Palmerino (eds.), Space, Imagination and the Cosmos from Antiquity to the Early Modern Period. Cham, Zwitserland: pp. 41-67.
    In contrast to other ancient philosophers, Epicurus and his followers famously maintained the infinity of matter, and consequently of worlds. This was inferred from the infinity of space, because they believed that a limited amount of matter would inevitably be scattered through infinite space, and hence be unable to meet and form stable compounds. By contrast, the Stoics claimed that there was only a finite amount of matter in infinite space, which stayed together because of a general centripetal tendency. The (...)
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  12. New Views on Diogenes of Oinoanda. Hammerstaedt, Morel, Güremen Diogenes of Oinoanda. Epicureanism and Philosophical Debates. Pp. XXVI + 321, Ills, B/W & Colour Maps. Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2017. Cased, €90. Isbn: 978-94-6270-101-4. [REVIEW]Inbal Cohen - 2018 - The Classical Review 68 (1):54-57.
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  13. Keine Furcht mit Diogenes! : Die Beherrschung von Empfindungen in der philosophischen Inschrift von Oinoanda.Jürgen Hammerstaedt - 2018 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 39 (2):301-322.
    The article investigates how Diogenes of Oenoanda in his huge 2nd cent. AD Epicurean wall inscription deals with the control of fear. It argues for restoring the fragmentary title of Diogenes’ Ethics–treatise with “feelings [of soul] and [body]”. In this way the importance given in Ethics to the evaluation of our feelings according to the Epicurean doctrine is reflected in the title. Diogenes in his introduction to the whole inscription lists up the control of irrational fears in the first place (...)
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  14. Epicurean Ethics in Horace: The Psychology of Satire.Sergio Yona - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    Horace's Satires owe debts of influence to a wide range of genres and authors, including, as this study demonstrates, the moral tradition of Epicureanism. Focusing on the philosopher Philodemus of Gadara, it argues that the central concerns of his work lie at the heart of the poet's criticisms of Roman society and its shortcomings.
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  15. Theory, Practice, and Modernity: Leo Strauss on Rousseau’s Epicureanism.Jared Holley - 2017 - Journal of the History of Ideas 78 (4):621-644.
  16. Demetrius of Laconia and the Debate Between the Stoics and the Epicureans on the Nature of Parental Love.Sean McConnell - 2017 - Classical Quarterly 67 (1):149–162.
    Epicurus denies that human beings have natural parental love for their children, and his account of the development of justice and human political community does not involve any natural affinity between human beings in general but rather a form of social contract. The Stoics to the contrary assert that parental love is natural; and, moreover, they maintain that natural parental love is the first principle of social οἰκείωσις, which provides the basis for the naturalness of justice and human political community. (...)
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  17. Memmius the Epicurean.Llewelyn Morgan & Barnaby Taylor - 2017 - Classical Quarterly 67 (2):528-541.
    InFam.13.1 Cicero, visiting Athens en route to Cilicia in the summer of 51b.c., writes to C. Memmius L.f., praetor in 58 but by the time of Cicero's communication an exile in Athens after the shambolic consular elections for 53; Memmius was absent from Athens in Mytilene, hence the need for Cicero to write to him. This letter, along withAtt.5.11.6 and 19.3, is our focus in the argument that follows, but, to summarize the situation in the very broadest terms, Cicero's concern (...)
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  18. Squaring the Epicurean Circle: Friendship and Happiness in the Garden.Benjamin Rossi - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (1):153-168.
    Epicurean ethics has been subject to withering ancient and contemporary criticism for the supposed irreconcilability of Epicurus’s emphatic endorsement of friendship and his equally clear and striking ethical egoism. Recently, Matthew Evans (2004) has suggested that the key to a plausible Epicurean response to these criticisms must begin by understanding why friendship is valuable for Epicurus. In the first section of this paper I develop Evans’ suggestion further. I argue that a shared conception of the human telos and of what (...)
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  19. Theology, Innatism, and the Epicurean Self.Máté Veres - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (1):129-152.
  20. Utility and Affection in Epicurean Friendship: Philodemus On the Gods 3, On Property Management, and Horace, Sermones 2.6.David Armstrong - 2016 - In Ruth Caston & Robert Kaster (eds.), Hope, Joy, and Affection in the Classical World. Emotions of the past. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 182-208.
  21. Ethics After Aristotle. By Brad Inwood.Brian E. Johnson - 2016 - International Philosophical Quarterly 56 (1):120-122.
  22. Epicureans and Atheists in France, 1650–1729.Alan Charles Kors - 2016 - Cambridge University Press.
    Atheism was the most foundational challenge to early-modern French certainties. Theologians and philosophers labelled such atheism as absurd, confident that neither the fact nor behaviour of nature was explicable without reference to God. The alternative was a categorical naturalism, whose most extreme form was Epicureanism. The dynamics of the Christian learned world, however, which this book explains, allowed the wide dissemination of the Epicurean argument. By the end of the seventeenth century, atheism achieved real voice and life. This book examines (...)
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  23. Conflicts of Atomisms. Some Major Differences Between Democritus and Colotes.Enrico Piergiacomi - 2016 - Elenchos 37 (1-2):147-180.
    The paper compares the thought of Democritus and that of Colotes. It is argued that the two thinkers diverge at least in three noteworthy respects: 1) they disagree about the nature of knowledge, for Democritus identifies it with a process which goes from raw sensation to intellectual understanding, whereas Colotes affirms the truth of every sensation and its fundamental role in the use of reason; 2) they have contrary opinions on the practice of “pleasing”, since the former totally rejects this (...)
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  24. Epicurean Wills, Empty Hopes, and the Problem of Post Mortem Concern.Bill Wringe - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (1-2):289-315.
    Many Epicurean arguments for the claim that death is nothing to us depend on the ‘Experience Constraint’: the claim that something can only be good or bad for us if we experience it. However, Epicurus’ commitment to the Experience Constraint makes his attitude to will-writing puzzling. How can someone who accepts the Experience Constraint be motivated to bring about post mortem outcomes?We might think that an Epicurean will-writer could be pleased by the thought of his/her loved ones being provided for (...)
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  25. Faculties in Ancient Philosophy.Klaus Corcilius - 2015 - In Dominik Perler (ed.), The Faculties: A History. Oxford University Press. pp. 19-58.
  26. The Poison and the Spider's Web: Diderot and Eighteenth-Century French Epicureanism.Jared Holley - 2015 - History of European Ideas 41 (8):1107-1124.
    SUMMARYThis article argues that the term ‘Epicurean’ had multiple meanings in the moral and political thought of the eighteenth century. Concentrating on the reception of Epicureanism in France, it shows that some critics focused on Epicurus’ hedonistic moral psychology and labelled Epicurean those thinkers who denied natural sociability; for others, who instead focused on Epicurus’ materialist natural philosophy, to label a thinker an Epicurean was to label them an atheist. This polyvalence is presented as a salutary caution against essentialising claims (...)
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  27. Epicureanism and Scepticism. S. Marchand, F. Verde Épicurisme Et Scepticisme. Pp. XII + 189. Rome: Sapienza Università Editrice, 2013. Paper, €17. Isbn: 978-88-98533-10-7. [REVIEW]Paul Jackson & Cécile Césarini - 2015 - The Classical Review 65 (1):74-76.
  28. Epitomizing Philosophy and the Critique of Epicurean Popularizers.Erlend D. MacGillivray - 2015 - Journal of Ancient History 3 (1).
  29. Were There Epicurean Mathematicians.Reviel Netz - 2015 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 49:283-319.
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  30. Será que, como defendem os epicuristas, estar morto não é um mal para quem morre?Domingos Faria - 2014 - Fundamento: Revista de Pesquisa Em Filosofia 5 (1).
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  31. Renaissance Humanism.Tony Houston - 2014 - Philo 17 (1):44-58.
    What Neoplatonism and scholasticism did for Plato and Aristotle, Renaissance humanism did for Cicero and Epicurus. Renaissance humanists were critical of efforts to reconcile Plato and Aristotle with Christianity, yet their own efforts to reconcile philosophy with Christianity were hardly faith­ful to the originals. Plato’s idealism was easily appropriated for Neoplatonist dualism. Aristotle’s metaphysics became orthodoxy for the scholastics. The Renaissance humanists transformed Stoic constancy into acquiescence, aca­demic skepticism into learned ignorance, and Epicureanism into an affirma­tion of material pleasure without (...)
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  32. Dewey and the Ancients: Essays on Hellenic and Hellenistic Themes in the Philosophy of John Dewey.Christopher C. Kirby (ed.) - 2014 - London: Bloomsbury.
    Dewey's students at Columbia saw him as "an Aristotelian more Aristotelian than Aristotle himself." However, until now, there has been little consideration of the influence Greek thought had on the intellectual development of this key American philosopher. -/- By examining, in detail, Dewey's treatment and appropriation of Greek thought, the authors in this volume reveal an otherwise largely overlooked facet of his intellectual development and finalized ideas. Rather than offering just one unified account of Dewey's connection to Greek thought, this (...)
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  33. 'Death is Nothing to Us:' A Critical Analysis of the Epicurean Views Concerning the Dread of Death.Evangelos D. Protopapadakis - 2014 - Antiquity and Modern World: Interpretations of Antiquity 8:316-323.
    To the mind of humans death is an impossible riddle, the ultimate of mysteries; therefore it has always been considered a task of paramount importance for philosophers to provide a satisfactory account for death. Among the numerous efforts to deal with the riddle of death, Epicurus’ one stands out not only for its unsurpassed simplicity and lucidness, but also for the innovative manner in which it approaches the issue: Epicurus denounces the fear of death as a profoundly unfruitful, unreasonable and (...)
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  34. The Epicurean Eclogues - Davis Parthenope: The Interplay of Ideas in Vergilian Bucolic. Pp. X + 181. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2012. Cased, €90, Us$125. Isbn: 978-90-04-23308-9. [REVIEW]Timothy Saunders - 2014 - The Classical Review 64 (1):123-125.
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  35. Lucretius, Epicurus, and the Logic of Multiple Explanations.R. J. Hankinson - 2013 - In Daryn Lehoux, A. D. Morrison & Alison Sharrock (eds.), Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science. Oxford University Press. pp. 69.
  36. La critique du critère de vérité épicurien chez Sextus Empiricus: un scepticisme sur le monde extérieur?Diego E. Machuca - 2013 - In S. Marchand & F. Verde (eds.), Épicurisme et scepticisme. Sapienza Università Editrice. pp. 105-127.
    It is generally agreed that one of the key differences between ancient skepticism and modern and contemporary skepticism is that the ancient skeptic does not call into question the existence of the external world, but only our ability to know the properties or qualities of external objects. In this paper, I argue that in Sextus Empiricus's attack on the Epicurean criterion of truth one finds evidence that the ancient Pyrrhonist also suspends judgment about the existence of external objects.
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  37. Pamela Gordon, The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus. [REVIEW]Tim O'Keefe - 2013 - Phoenix 67 (3-4):405-407.
  38. J. Fish, K.R. Sanders Epicurus and the Epicurean Tradition. Pp. Xii + 267. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. Cased, £55, US$90. ISBN: 978-0-521-19478-5. [REVIEW]Antonello Orlando - 2013 - The Classical Review 63 (1):70-72.
  39. Epicure et les épicuriens au Moyen Âge.Aurélien Robert - 2013 - Micrologus:3-46.
    Contrary to what is generally said about the reception of Epicurus in the Middle Ages, many medieval authors agreed on his great wisdom, even if he made some philosophical and theological errors. From the 12th century to the 14th century on can find several "Lives of Epicurus" in which the best sayings of Epicurus are gathered from ancient sources (Seneca, Cicero, Lactantius, etc.). In this paper, we follow these quite unknown sources about Epicureanism in the Middle Ages. We try to (...)
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  40. Mrs. Vergil's Horrid Wars.James Tatum - 2013 - Arion 21 (1):3-46.
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  41. Catherine Wilson. Epicureanism at the Origins of Modernity. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2008. Pp. 304. $75.00 ; $35.00. [REVIEW]Andreas Blank - 2012 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 2 (1):200-203.
  42. Epicureismo E Pederastia: Il "Lucrezio" E l'"Anacreonte" di Alessandro Marchetti Secondo Il Sant'uffizio.Gustavo Costa - 2012 - L.S. Olschki.
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  43. Platonic Caverns and Epicurean Worlds.Anne Eusterschulte - 2012 - In Anne Eusterschulte & Henning S. Hufnagel (eds.), Turning Traditions Upside Down: Rethinking Giordano Bruno's Enlightenment. Central European University Press. pp. 63.
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  44. Paul's Agon: Hellenistic Self-Transformation or Judaic Apocalyptic Eschatology in 1 and 2 Thessalonians.Giosuè Ghisalberti - 2012 - Philosophy and Theology 24 (1):49-66.
    In the letters written to the Thessalonians, Paul’s teaching appears to be irreconcilably divided between a still influential Judaic apocalyptic eschatology and, an emphasis on Hellenistic self-transformation and, in particular, how the philosophy of Epicurus contributed to the psychological health of recent converts. By interpreting the rhetoric of wrath, quiet, sleep, and childbirth, Paul’s teaching as it emerges in 1 and 2 Thessalonians reveals how the gospel must necessarily encounter, agonistically, two foundations of thought. During the early composition of the (...)
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  45. The Invention and Gendering of Epicurus.Pamela Gordon - 2012 - University of Michigan Press.
    The aim of this study is to present a necessarily fragmented history of the way the Garden's outlook on pleasure captured Greek and Roman imaginations — particularly among non-Epicureans — for generations after its legendary founding.
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  46. Epicureanism by Tim O'Keefe. [REVIEW]Monte Johnson - 2012 - Aestimatio 9:108.
  47. 'A Woman's Reason': Aphra Behn Reads Lucretius.Sophie Tomlinson - 2012 - Intellectual History Review 22 (3):355-372.
  48. Epicurean Virtues, Epicurean Friendship: Cicero Vs. The Herculaneum Papyri.David Armstrong - 2011 - In Jeffrey Fish & Kirk R. Sanders (eds.), Epicurus and the Epicurean Tradition. Cambridge University Press. pp. 105-128.
  49. Autodidact and Student: On the Relationship of Authority and Autonomy in Epicurus and the Epicurean Tradition.Michael Erler - 2011 - In Jeffrey Fish & Kirk R. Sanders (eds.), Epicurus and the Epicurean Tradition. Cambridge University Press. pp. 9--28.
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  50. Not All Politicians Are Sisyphus: What Roman Epicureans Were Taught About Politics.Jeffrey Fish - 2011 - In Jeffrey Fish & Kirk R. Sanders (eds.), Epicurus and the Epicurean Tradition. Cambridge University Press. pp. 72-104.
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