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Summary What is hope, from a philosophical point of view?  Can hope be characterized in terms of belief (or degrees of belief) plus some sort of desire or affect? If this kind of “belief-plus” analysis insufficient to characterize hope, what other conditions are required? Are there different kinds of hope – some that are susceptible to belief-plus analysis, and others that aren’t? For instance, could we regard the “idle hope” that I win the lottery as constituted by the belief that it’s possible plus the desire that it happen, but then develop more robust conceptions of the kinds of hope that actively engage deliberation and moral psychology (e.g. the hope that I recover from this terminal diagnosis, despite the long odds)? How does a particular view of hope (or one of its kinds) relate to traditional accounts of hope as a human virtue? Is hope a virtue? If some kind of hope is a virtue, is it a moral virtue, or an intellectual one, or some sort of hybrid?
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524 found
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1 — 50 / 524
  1. The Art of Narrative Repair Through Bloch's Principle of Hope.Carolina Drake - manuscript
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  2. Having a Sense of Humor as a Virtue.Mark Alfano, Mandi Astola & Paula Urbanowicz - forthcoming - Journal of Value Inquiry:1-22.
    Could having a sense of humor be a virtue? In this paper, we argue for an affirmative answer to this question. Like other virtues, a sense of humor enhances and inhibits the expression of various emotions, especially amusement, contempt, trust, and hope. Someone possesses a virtuous sense of humor to the extent that they are well-disposed to appropriately enhance or inhibit these emotions in themselves and others through both embodied reactions (e.g., smiling, laughter, eyerolls) and language (e.g., telling jokes, understanding (...)
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  3. Hope Vs. Hopelessness.Harold W. Bernard - forthcoming - Humanitas.
    Reviews concepts of hope, despair, and depression. Hope is viewed as the belief and expectation that one has some control over life and the future, that unpleasant events are products of both personal perspective and fate, and that problems will be mastered or will fade.
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  4. Hope and the Myth of Success: Toward a Dialectics of Hope.Frank M. Buckley - forthcoming - Humanitas.
    Regards an orientation toward success (i.e., winning the approval of others) as an obstacle to hope. Moods and expectations unrelieved by hope can degenerate into a compulsive idea that life is a process of losing and dying without any compensatory gains. The prime source of deepened hope is to move toward the experience of presence with another. Acknowledging the dialectic nature of hope is itself also a source of hope. Affirming life and love enables one to face their opposites—death and (...)
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  5. Hope but Not Optimism: The Kantian Mind at the End of All Things.Andrew Chignell - forthcoming - In Anna Ezekiel & Katerina Mihaylova (eds.), Hope and the Kantian Legacy: New Contributions to the History of Philosophy. London: Bloomsbury.
  6. The Focus Theory of Hope.Andrew Chignell - forthcoming - The Philosophical Quarterly.
    Most elpistologists (philosophers of hope) now agree that hope for a specific outcome involves more than just desire plus the presupposition that the outcome is possible. This paper argues that the additional element of hope is a disposition to focus on the desired outcome in a certain way. I first survey the debate about the nature of hope in the recent literature, offer objections to some important competing accounts, and describe and defend the view that hope involves a kind of (...)
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  7. Faithfully Taking Pascal’s Wager.Elizabeth Jackson - forthcoming - The Monist.
    This paper examines the relationship between taking Pascal’s wager, faith, and hope. First, I argue that many who take Pascal’s wager have genuine faith that God exists. The person of faith and the wagerer have several things in common, including a commitment to God and positive cognitive and conative attitudes toward God’s existence. I also argue that if one’s credences in theism are too low to have faith, the wagerer can still hope that God exists, another commitment-justifying theological virtue. I (...)
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  8. The Epistemology of Faith and Hope.Elizabeth Jackson - forthcoming - In Kurt Sylvan (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Epistemology, Third Edition. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
    This paper surveys the epistemology of two attitudes: faith and hope. First, I examine descriptive questions about faith and hope. Faith and hope are resilient attitudes with unique cognitive and conative components; while related, they are also distinct, notably in that hope’s cognitive component is weaker than faith’s. I then turn to faith and hope's epistemic (ir)rationality, and discuss various ways that faith and hope can be rational and irrational. Finally, I discuss the relationship between faith, hope, and knowledge: while (...)
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  9. Faith.Elizabeth Jackson - forthcoming - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Faith is a trusting commitment to someone or something. Faith helps us meet our goals, keeps our relationships secure, and enables us to retain our commitments over time. Faith is thus a central part of a flourishing life. -/- This article is about the philosophy of faith. There are many philosophical questions about faith, such as: What is faith, and what are its main components or features? What are the different kinds of faith? What’s the relationship between faith and other (...)
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  10. The Primacy of Hope in Human Flourishing.Anne Jeffrey & Krista Mehari - forthcoming - The Monist.
    We advance an argument that the virtue of hope holds pride of place in development of psychological traits that promote one’s flourishing. We define hope, the virtue, as the disposition to envision future good possibilities for oneself and one’s community and to move towards those possibilities. Our argument is partly theoretical and partly empirical. On the theoretical side, we show that hope is not simply one virtue among many, but rather, hope is a necessary condition for the development of other (...)
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  11. Commitment, Hope, and Despondency.Charles A. Kiesler - forthcoming - Humanitas.
    Discusses the relationship between commitment (pledging or binding oneself to certain acts), hope (anticipating that positive events will occur), despondency (anticipating negative events), and fatalism (believing that there is nothing one can do to affect the future). Factors contributing to despondency in the US include an emphasis on self and emotionality that gives the illusion of increased intimacy but avoids real caring and commitment toward others; experiences of alienation and aloneness; the high crime rate; and a loss of trust in (...)
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  12. Hope as a Source of Grit.Catherine Rioux - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    Psychologists and philosophers have argued that the capacity for perseverance or “grit” depends both on willpower and on a kind of epistemic resilience. But can a form of hopefulness in one’s future success also constitute a source of grit? I argue that substantial practical hopefulness, as a hope to bring about a desired outcome through exercises of one’s agency, can serve as a distinctive ground for the capacity for perseverance. Gritty agents’ “practical hope” centrally involves an attention-fuelled, risk-inclined weighting of (...)
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  13. From 'Suspicion' to 'Affirmation' : A Study of the Role of the Imagination and Prose Rhythm, Drawing Upon the Hermeneutical Philosophy of Paul Ricoeur, in Which There May Be Movement From Suspicion to Affirmation of Reasonable Hope.Raymond T. Shorthouse - forthcoming - Philosophical Explorations.
    The aim of this thesis is to show that a familiar hermeneutical movement from suspicion to affirmation of rational meaning, as a reader reflects on a narrative, is, in part, grounded in the narrative's rhythmic structure which mediates a sonorous condition of being appropriated by the reader. This hermeneutical process involves the reader in appropriating the temporal perspective which creates a 'space' for reflection in which a provisional conceptual unity is made possible, but subject to continuing movement from suspicion to (...)
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  14. Hope, Hopelessness, and Violence.Ezra Stotland - forthcoming - Humanitas.
    Suggests that the form of violence, its direction and purpose, and the conditions that start and end it, are determined mainly by the degree of hope or hopelessness giving rise to it. Violence is defined as an action whose intent is to harm another person. "Emotional violence" is an effort to reduce anxiety, which if successful arouses hope. "Instrumental violence" is directed at a specific goal in a more dispassionate manner. Societies should find moral equivalents to these 2 forms of (...)
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  15. Feeling the Unknown: Emotions of Uncertainty and Their Valence.Juliette Vazard - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-20.
    For creatures like us, entertaining possible future scenarios of how our life might play out is often accompanied or “charged” with emotions like hope and anxiety. What will interest me in this article is whether the epistemic profile of hope and anxiety, and in particular the fact that they are directed at uncertain outcomes, might pose a threat to the stability of their valence. Hope and anxiety are not emotions which relate us to evaluative properties of actual events, they relate (...)
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  16. The Lord of the Rings as Philosophy: Environmental Enchantment and Resistance in Peter Jackson and J.R.R. Tolkien.John Whitmire & David Henderson - forthcoming - The Palgrave Handbook of Popular Culture as Philosophy.
    A key philosophical feature of Peter Jackson’s film interpretation of J.R.R. Tolkien’s _The Lord of the Rings_ is its use of fantasy to inspire a “recovery” of the actual, or in other words, a reawakening to the beauty of nature and of the many possible ways of living in healthier ecological relation to the world. Though none of these ways is perfectly achieved, this pluralistic view is demonstrated in the various lifeways of Hobbits, Elves, Men, and Ents. All of the (...)
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  17. Critical Hope: How to Grapple with Complexity, Lead with Purpose, and Cultivate Transformative Social Change.Kari Grain - 2022 - Berkeley, California: North Atlantic Books.
    An introduction to the seven principles for practicing critical hope.
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  18. Faith, Hope, and Justification.Elizabeth Jackson - 2022 - In Luis R. G. Oliveira & Paul Silva Jr (eds.), Propositional and Doxastic Justification. New York: Routledge. pp. 201–216.
    The distinction between propositional and doxastic justification is normally applied to belief. The goal of this paper is to apply the distinction to faith and hope. Before doing so, I discuss the nature of faith and hope, and how they contrast with belief—belief has no essential conative component, whereas faith and hope essentially involve the conative. I discuss implications this has for evaluating faith and hope, and apply this to the propositional/doxastic distinction. There are two key upshots. One, bringing in (...)
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  19. Sometimes I Feel Hopeful.Jaclyn Jaycox - 2022 - North Mankato, Minnesota: Pebble.
    What does it mean to be hopeful? Feeling hopeful is an emotion everybody has! Children will learn how to identify when they are hopeful and ways to manage their feelings. Large, vivid photos help illustrate what hopefulness looks like. A mindfulness activity will give kids an opportunity to explore their feelings.
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  20. Apocalypse Without God: Apocalyptic Thought, Ideal Politics, and the Limits of Utopian Hope.Ben Jones - 2022 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Apocalypse, it seems, is everywhere. Preachers with vast followings proclaim the world's end and apocalyptic fears grip even the non-religious amid climate change, pandemics, and threats of nuclear war. But as these ideas pervade popular discourse, grasping their logic remains elusive. Ben Jones argues that we can gain insight into apocalyptic thought through secular thinkers. He starts with a puzzle: Why would secular thinkers draw on Christian apocalyptic beliefs--often dismissed as bizarre--to interpret politics? The apocalyptic tradition proves appealing in part (...)
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  21. The Phenomenology of Hope.Jack M. C. Kwong - 2022 - American Philosophical Quarterly 59 (3):313-325.
    What is the phenomenology of hope? A common view is that hope has a generally positive and pleasant affective tone. This rosy depiction, however, has recently been challenged. Certain hopes, it has been objected, are such that they are either entirely negative in valence or neutral in tone. In this paper, I argue that this challenge has only limited success. In particular, I show that it only applies to one sense of hope but leaves another sense—one that is implicitly but (...)
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  22. Does Hope Require Belief?Michael Milona - 2022 - American Philosophical Quarterly 59 (2):191-199.
    This paper interrogates a widely accepted view about the nature of hope. The view is that hoping that p involves a belief about the prospects of p. It is argued that taking hope to require belief is at odds with some forms of recalcitrant hope and certain ways in which hope patterns similarly to other emotions. The paper concludes by explaining why it matters whether hope requires belief.
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  23. Defining Optimisms.Massin Olivier - 2022 - A Tribute to Ronald de Sousa, Edited by Julien Deonna, Christine Tappolet and Fabrice Teroni in 2022.
    To be optimistic, it is standardly assumed, is to have positive expectations. I here argue that this definition is correct but captures only one variety of optimism – here called factual optimism. It leaves out two other important varieties of optimism. The first – focal optimism – corresponds to the idea of seeing the glass half full. The second – axiological optimism – consists in the view that good is stronger than bad. Those three varieties of optimism are irreducible to (...)
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  24. The Culture Industry and Transformation of the Value of Hope.Selda Salman - 2022 - Kultura I Wartości 9 (32):69-78.
    In this paper I point to the degraded value of hope in the contemporary digital world and discuss the dangers of this transformation. Hope constitutes one of the basic drives that sustains vitality in the human species. Especially contemporary philosophers such as Hume, Kant, and Bloch, among others, consider hope from a philosophical perspective and despite their differences, they agree on the overall importance of hope as one of the fundamental motivations of humans towards a future life that makes striving (...)
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  25. Other Side of Hope: Flipping the Script on Cynicism and Despair and Rediscovering Our Humanity.Danielle Strickland - 2022 - Nashville, Tennessee: W Publishing Group, an imprint of Thomas Nelson.
    Overcome the twin giants of cynicism and despair that threaten to derail your emotional and physical health and find hope for life by witnessing the power of God's redemptive healing. Part guidebook and part storytelling, The Other Side of Hope is a uniquely designed flip-book with two entry points to the message of finding hope in a desperately harsh world. One part of the book focuses on theory and biblical philosophy, including insights into fighting cynicism, the architect of despair; embracing (...)
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  26. Knowledge, Hope, and Fallibilism.Matthew A. Benton - 2021 - Synthese 198:1673-1689.
    Hope, in its propositional construction "I hope that p," is compatible with a stated chance for the speaker that not-p. On fallibilist construals of knowledge, knowledge is compatible with a chance of being wrong, such that one can know that p even though there is an epistemic chance for one that not-p. But self-ascriptions of propositional hope that p seem to be incompatible, in some sense, with self-ascriptions of knowing whether p. Data from conjoining hope self-ascription with outright assertions, with (...)
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  27. Liturgical Philosophy of Religion: An Untimely Manifesto on Sincerity, Acceptance, and Hope.Andrew Chignell - 2021 - In M. David Eckel, Allen Speight & Troy DuJardin (eds.), The Future of the Philosophy of Religion. Springer. pp. 73-94.
    This loosely-argued manifesto contains some suggestions regarding what the philosophy of religion might become in the 21st century. It was written for a brainstorming workshop over a decade ago, and some of the recommendations and predictions it contains have already been partly actualized (that’s why it is now a bit "untimely"). The goal is to sketch three aspects of a salutary “liturgical turn” in philosophy of religion. (Note: “liturgy” here refers very broadly to communal religious service and experience generally, not (...)
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  28. Freedom Freed by Hope: A Conversation with Johann B. Metz and William F. Lynch on the 'Identity Crisis' in the West.Alberto Domínguez Munáiz - 2021 - New York: Peter Lang.
    A hopeless individual is more vulnerable and is threatened with indifference, meaninglessness, anxiety, and despair. Are there symptoms of this in the West? Is it an individual phenomenon or has it been historically and culturally transmitted? This book analyzes how hope contributes to forming a healthy and responsible identity. But, what hop...
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  29. Hope, Worry, and Suspension of Judgment.James Fritz - 2021 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 51 (8):573-587.
    In this paper, I defend an epistemic requirement on fitting hopes and worries: it is fitting to hope or to worry that p only if one’s epistemic position makes it rational to suspend judgment as to whether p. This view, unlike prominent alternatives, is ecumenical; it retains its plausibility against a variety of different background views of epistemology. It also has other important theoretical virtues: it is illuminating, elegant, and extensionally adequate. Fallibilists about knowledge have special reason to be friendly (...)
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  30. Hope and Human Longevity, an Actual Challenging Topic.Gabriel Hasmațuchi & Maria Sinaci - 2021 - Revue Roumaine de Philosophie 2 (65):337-346.
    This paper represents an attempt to correlate the concept of hope with the notion of human longevity and reflects the actual debates around the problem of life extension. Our analysis combines ideas from philosophy, sociology, bioethics, and religion to illustrate the problem of longevity in the context of biomedical and technological progress, and - at the same time - to show the (possible) consequences of prolonging life over the human body limits. Extending human life through emerging technologies is much closer (...)
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  31. Belief, Faith, and Hope: On the Rationality of Long-Term Commitment.Elizabeth Jackson - 2021 - Mind 130 (517):35–57.
    I examine three attitudes: belief, faith, and hope. I argue that all three attitudes play the same role in rationalizing action. First, I explain two models of rational action—the decision-theory model and the belief-desire model. Both models entail there are two components of rational action: an epistemic component and a conative component. Then, using this framework, I show how belief, faith, and hope that p can all make it rational to accept, or act as if, p. I conclude by showing (...)
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  32. Controlling Hope.Michael Milona & Katie Stockdale - 2021 - Ratio 34 (4):345-354.
    Ratio, Volume 34, Issue 4, Page 345-354, December 2021.
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  33. Hope: Conceptual and Normative Issues.Catherine Rioux - 2021 - Philosophy Compass 16 (3).
    Hope is often seen as at once valuable and dangerous: it can fuel our motivation in the face of challenges, but can also distract us from reality and lead us to irrationality. How can we learn to “hope well,” and what does “hoping well” involve? Contemporary philosophers disagree on such normative questions about hope and also on how to define hope as a mental state. This article explores recent philosophical debates surrounding the concept of hope and the norms governing hope. (...)
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  34. Hope, Solidarity, and Justice.Katie Stockdale - 2021 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 7 (2):1-23.
    This article defends an account of collective hope that arises through solidarity in the pursuit of justice. I begin by reviewing recent literature on the nature of hope. I then explore the relationship between hope and solidarity to demonstrate the ways in which solidarity can give rise to hope. I suggest that the hope born of solidarity is collective when it is shared by at least some others, when it is caused or strengthened by activity in a collective action setting, (...)
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  35. Hope Under Oppression.Katie Stockdale - 2021 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    This book explores the nature, value, and role of hope in human life under conditions of oppression. Oppression is often a threat and damage to hope, yet many members of oppressed groups, including prominent activists pursuing a more just world, find hope valuable and even essential to their personal and political lives. This book offers a unique evaluative framework for hope that captures the intrinsic value of hope for many of us, the rationality and morality of hope, and ultimately how (...)
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  36. Infinitely Full of Hope: Fatherhood and the Future in an Age of Crisis and Disaster.Tom Whyman - 2021 - London: Repeater.
    A philosophical memoir about becoming a father in an increasingly terrible world – can I hope the child growing in my partner's womb will have a good-enough life? For Kant, philosophy boiled down to three key questions: “What can I know?”, “What ought I do?”, and “What can I hope for?” In philosophy departments, that third question has largely been neglected at the expense of the first two – even though it is crucial for understanding why anyone might ask them (...)
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  37. Signs of Hope: How Small Acts of Love Can Change Your World.Amy Wolff - 2021 - Grand Rapids, Michigan: Zondervan Books.
    Mom and motivational speaker Amy Wolff wants you to know that you are never too broken to help others. In Signs of Hope, Wolff tells the story of how she founded an accidental movement, one that guided her through her own grief and touched thousands of others throughout the world.
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  38. Speranza e disperazione.Eugenio Borgna - 2020 - Torino: Giulio Einaudi editore s.p.a..
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  39. Hope and Despair at the Kantian Chicken Factory: Moral Arguments About Making a Difference.Andrew Chignell - 2020 - In Lucy Allais & John J. Callanan (eds.), Kant and Animals. Oxford University Press. pp. 213-238.
  40. Beyond Hope: Philosophical Reflections.Stephen J. Costello - 2020 - Newcastle upon Tyne, UK: Cambridge Scholars Press.
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  41. Kantian Theoretical Hope.Micha Danziger - 2020 - Contemporary Studies in Kantian Philosophy 5:1-14.
    There has been a considerable amount of research concerning Kantian hope, but focused on the perspective of Kant’s moral and religious philosophy. In this essay, I will present the Kantian theory of theoretical hope, as found in the first Critique. My argument first establishes that there is such a thing as Kantian theoretical hope. And the second part of the argument defines Kantian theoretical hope as a priori, necessary, and universal within the use of reason and understanding, or, in Kantian (...)
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  42. The Saving Line: Benjamin, Adorno, and the Caesuras of Hope.Marton Dornbach - 2020 - Evanston, IL, USA: Northwestern University Press.
    In attempting to determine why the Enlightenment project had derailed and how this failure might be remedied, Walter Benjamin and Theodor Adorno both turned to canonical literary narratives. The resultant works, Benjamin’s major essay on Goethe’s Elective Affinities and Adorno’s meditation on the Odyssey in Dialectic of Enlightenment, are centrally concerned with the very act of narration. The Saving Line reconstructs a hitherto unnoticed, wide-ranging dialogue between these foundational texts of the Frankfurt School. At the heart of Dornbach’s argument is (...)
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  43. Speranza.Giuseppe Goisis - 2020 - Padova: Edizioni Messaggero.
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  44. Hope in Ancient Greek Philosophy.G. Scott Gravlee - 2020 - In Historical and Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Hope. Cham: pp. 3-23.
    This chapter aims to illuminate ways in which hope was significant in the philosophy of classical Greece. Although ancient Greek philosophies contain few dedicated and systematic expositions on the nature of hope, they nevertheless include important remarks relating hope to the good life, to reason and deliberation, and to psychological phenomena such as memory, imagination, fear, motivation, and pleasure. After an introductory discussion of Hesiod and Heraclitus, the chapter focuses on Plato and Aristotle. Consideration is given both to Plato’s direct (...)
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  45. Hope and Hopefulness.Jack M. C. Kwong - 2020 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 50 (7):832-843.
    This paper proposes a new framework for thinking about hope, with certain unexpected consequences. Specifically, I argue that a shift in focus from locutions like “x hopes that” and “x is hoping that” to “x is hopeful that” and “x has hope that” can improve our understanding of hope. This approach, which emphasizes hopefulness as the central concept, turns out to be more revealing and fruitful in tackling some of the issues that philosophers have raised about hope, such as the (...)
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  46. L'espérance, par principe.Marc Lebiez - 2020 - Paris IIe: Éditions Kimé.
    Il y eut la fabuleuse croissance économique et industrielle des décennies d'après-guerre. Il y eut l'utopie communiste puis celle, libertaire, des années soixante-dix. Comme tout ce qui pouvait susciter une espérance, tout cela est mort. Il n'est plus question que de pollution gigantesque, de dérèglement climatique, d'invasion par les pauvres, de postures belliqueuses. Tout ce qui peut paraître désespérant est présenté comme inéluctable ; tout ce qui pourrait nourrir une espérance serait illusoire. En conséquence, la politique, cet art du possible, (...)
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  47. Discovering the Virtue of Hope.Michael Milona - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (3):740-754.
    This paper asks whether there is a moral virtue of hope, and if so, what it is. The enterprise is motivated by a historical asymmetry, namely that while Christian thinkers have long classed hope as a theological virtue, it has not traditionally been classed as a moral one. But this is puzzling, for hoping well is not confined to the sphere of religion; and consequently we might expect that if the theological virtue is structurally sound, there will be a secular, (...)
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  48. Philosophy of Hope.Michael Milona - 2020 - In Steven C. Van den Heuvel (ed.), Historical and Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Hope. Springer. pp. 99-116.
    The philosophy of hope centers on two interlocking sets of questions. The first concerns the nature of hope. Specific questions here include how to analyze hope, how hope motivates us, and whether there is only one type of hope. The second set concerns the value of hope. Key questions here include whether and when it is good to hope and whether there is a virtue of hope. Philosophers of hope tend to proceed from the first set of questions to the (...)
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  49. The Intersection of Hopes and Dreams.Michael Milona - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (4):645-663.
    A familiar injunction is to follow your dreams. But what are these dreams? Despite their importance, philosophers have almost entirely ignored the topic. This paper fills this gap by advancing an account of the psychological makeup and the normative powers of dreams. To elucidate their psychology, I identify the salient features of dreams. I argue that these features are explained by the hypothesis that dreams are a species of hope. More specifically, the proposal is that dreams fit the standard model (...)
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  50. The Little Book of Hope.Meera Riitta Ojala - 2020 - Berkeley, California: Regent Press.
    These days a good dose of Hope is good for all of us. Anyone will enjoy this spiritual and inspirational journey filled with reflections and pictures instilling hope and reminding us how challenges can be turned into opportunities. This book is encouraging to anyone who is struggling. It's a companion that can help us learn more about ourselves and life. This book is born out of a "dark night of the soul". The author has survived two cancers and is sharing (...)
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