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  1. Is There Are a Possibility of an Ugly Aesthetic Idea in Kant's Aesthetics?Mojca Küplen - forthcoming - In Violetta L. Waibel and Margit Ruffing (ed.), Proceedings of the 12. International Kant Congress Nature and Freedom. De Gruyter.
    In Kant’s aesthetic theory, the association of ugliness with aesthetic ideas is not immediately apparent. Even more, it has been argued by most of Kant’s commentators that ugliness cannot express aesthetic ideas. In short, they claim that accordance with taste (i.e. free harmony between imagination and understanding) is a necessary condition for an aesthetic idea to be expressed in a way that makes sense to others. But if production of aesthetic ideas must be restrained by taste in order to have (...)
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  2. Batteux, Kant and Schiller on Fine Art and Moral Education.Aviv Reiter & Ido Geiger - forthcoming - Journal of Philosophy of Education.
    Journal of Philosophy of Education, EarlyView.
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  3. Art, Authenticity, and Understanding.David Suarez - forthcoming - In Jens Pier & Aron Schwertner (eds.), Limits of Intelligibility: Issues from Kant and Wittgenstein. Routledge.
    Early 20th century debates over the possibility of ‘metaphysics’ are grounded in a set of questions and answers whose central themes are already delineated in Kant’s critical philosophy. Wittgenstein and Carnap are sympathetic to Kant’s dismissal of transcendent metaphysics, but skeptical that there could be any substantive account of the fundamental conditions of our meaning-making. By contrast, Heidegger follows Fichte and the early German Romantics in seeing answers to the problems raised by metacritique not in science, but in the non-discursive (...)
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  4. Judging Contemporary Art with Kant.Clive Cazeaux - 2021 - Kantian Review 26 (4):635-652.
    This article demonstrates the relevance of Kant to the interpretation of contemporary art. The defining properties of contemporary art are the impossibility of definition in material, formal or stylistic terms, and the central role that concepts play in the interpretation of a work. Danto and Osborne suggest how concepts might be applied but they do not develop their proposals. Kant’s theory of judgement can provide a fuller account on the basis of the notions of purposiveness and play. The way in (...)
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  5. Conceptual Art and Aesthetic Ideas.Diarmuid Costello - 2021 - Kantian Review 26 (4):603-618.
    This paper considers whether Kant’s aesthetics withstands the challenge of conceptual art. I begin by looking at two competing views of conceptual art by recent philosophers, before settling on an ‘inclusive’ view of the form: conceptual art includes both ‘strong’ and ‘weak’ non-perceptual art. I then set out two kinds of conceptual complexity that I argue are implicated by all aesthetic judgements of art on Kant’s view: the concept of art itself, and the idea the work is meant to express. (...)
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  6. Kant on Aesthetic Ideas, Rational Ideas and the Subject-Matter of Art.Ido Geiger - 2021 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 79 (2):186-199.
    The notion of aesthetic ideas is of great importance to Kant's thinking about art. Despite its importance, he says little about it. He characterizes aesthetic ideas as representations of the imagination and says that the gift of artistic genius is the inscrutable capacity to envision them. Furthermore, they are counterparts of rational ideas. Works of art thus sensibly present rational ideas; the pleasure they occasion is a consequence of the enriching process of reflection upon the wealth of content they sensibly (...)
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  7. Kant’s Theory of Modern Art?Paul Guyer - 2021 - Kantian Review 26 (4):619-634.
    Can Kant’s theory of fine art serve as a theory of modern art? It all depends on what ‘modern’ means. The word can mean current or contemporary, indexed to the time of use, and in that sense the answer is yes: Kant’s theory of genius implies that successful art is always to some extent novel, so there should always be something that counts as contemporary art on his theory. But ‘modern’ can also be used adjectively, perhaps more properly as ‘modernist’, (...)
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  8. Lyotard and Kant on the State of the Sublime in Art.Adrián Kvokačka - 2021 - Con-Textos Kantianos 14:403-415.
    In this paper, I address the relationship between Lyotard’s account of the sublime in art and Kant’s own attempt at considering sublime art as a possible counterpart to fine art. Lyotard recognises the roots of modern art - and avant-garde particularly -in Kant’s account of the sublime. This is interesting, forit is generally assumed that Kant didn’t devise the notion to be applied to art as such. In the lack of any explicit consideration of artistic sublime in Kant’s text, what (...)
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  9. Kant and Recent Philosophies of Art.João Lemos - 2021 - Kantian Review 26 (4):567-582.
    This article is to be a bridge between Kant’s aesthetics and contemporary art – not by being a paper on Kant and contemporary art, but rather by being on Kant and contemporary philosophy of art. I claim that Kant’s views on the appreciation of art can accommodate contextualism as well as ethicism. I argue that not only does contextualism fit Kant’s views on the appreciation of art; in §§51–3 of the third Critique, Kant’s appreciation of art is in accordance with (...)
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  10. What Makes Kant an Aesthetic Cognitivist About Fine Art? A Response to Young.Aviv Reiter - 2021 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 79 (1):108-111.
  11. Kant on the Aesthetic Ideas of Beautiful Nature.Aviv Reiter - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (4):403-419.
    For Kant the definitive end of art is the expression of aesthetic ideas that are sensible counterparts of rational ideas. But there is another type of aesthetic idea: ‘Beauty can in general be called the _expression_ of aesthetic ideas: only in beautiful nature the mere reflection on a given intuition, without a concept of what the object ought to be, is sufficient for arousing and communicating the idea of which that object is considered as the _expression_.’ What are these aesthetic (...)
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  12. Kant’s “Theory of Music”.Oliver Thorndike - 2021 - Con-Textos Kantianos 14:416-438.
    One thing to expect from a theory of absolute music is that it explains what makes it so significant to us. Kant rightly observes that the essence of absolute music is our affective response to it. Yet none of the standard 18 th century theories, arousal theory and aesthetic rationalism, can explain both the universality of a judgment of taste and its subjective emotional content. The paper argues that Kant’s own aesthetic theory of aesthetic ideas is on the right path (...)
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  13. On Conceptual Revision and Aesthetic Judgement.Sabina Vaccarino Bremner - 2021 - Kantian Review 26 (4):531-547.
    This paper calls into question the view typically attributed to Kant that aesthetic judgements are particularist, resisting all conceptual determination. Instead, it claims that Kant conceives of aesthetic judgements, particularly of art, as playing an important role in the revision of concepts: one sense in which aesthetic judgements, as Kant defines them, ‘find a universal’ for a given particular. To understand the relation between artistic judgements and concepts requires that we consider what I call Kant’s diachronic account of aesthetic ideas, (...)
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  14. Kant on Form or Design.James O. Young - 2021 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 79 (1):112-115.
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  15. Presenting the Unpresentable: Jean-François Lyotard’s Kantian Art-Sublime.Rachel Zuckert - 2021 - Kantian Review 26 (4):549-565.
    This article reconstructs Jean-François Lyotard’s theory of the sublime in contemporary art, focusing on his claim that such art ‘presents’ the unpresentable, and tracing its origins in Kant’s account of the sublime. I propose that Lyotard identifies a difficulty concerning Kant’s account: to understand why the disparate elements in the experience of the sublime should be synthesized to form that experience. Lyotard recasts this difficulty as a pragmatic problem for artistic practice – how to ‘testify’ to the absolute in a (...)
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  16. Rethinking Kant 's Distinction Between the Beauty of Art and the Beauty of Nature.Aaron Halper - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (4):857-875.
    This paper argues that Kant presents two different accounts of beauty, one that applies properly to art and one that applies properly to nature. The judgment of beauty that applies properly to nature can be free and thus judged without concepts. The work of art, however, is judged beautiful when it expresses aesthetic ideas. This distinction then enables me to explain several problematic passages in Kant's text: those that serve to distinguish these two conceptions of beauty from one another as (...)
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  17. Kant on Poetry and Cognition.Iris Vidmar Jovanović - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 54 (1):1-17.
    Our engagements with poetry often leave us with a sense of having been not only aesthetically pleased and emotionally aroused but intellectually stimulated and cognitively rewarded.1 However, explicating the nature of such intellectual stimulus and accounting for poetry’s cognitive values are not easy tasks, given that poetry does not stand in the same relation to truth and knowledge as do science and philosophy. How then to account for the undeniable experience of having undergone a profound cognitive change after engaging with (...)
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  18. Reflective and Non-Reflective Aesthetic Ideas in Kant’s Theory of Art.Mojca Kuplen - 2020 - British Journal of Aesthetics 1.
    The aim of this paper is to resolve some of the inconsistencies within Kant’s theory of aesthetic ideas that have been left unaddressed by previous interpretations. Specifically, Kant’s text appears to be imbued with the following two tensions. First, there appears to be a conflict between his commitment to the view that mere sensations cannot function as vehicles for the communication of aesthetic ideas and his claim that musical tones, on account of being mere sensations, can express aesthetic ideas. Second, (...)
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  19. Can Kant’s Aesthetics Accommodate Conceptual Art? A Reply to Costello.Ioannis Trisokkas - 2020 - Con-Textos Kantianos 12:226-247.
    Diarmuid Costello has recently argued that, contra received opinion, Kant’s aesthetics can accommodate conceptual art, as well as all other art. Costello offers an interpretation of Kant’s art theory that demands from all art a minimal structure involving three basic “players” and three basic “actions” corresponding to those “players.” The article takes issue with the “action” assigned by Costello’s Kant to the artwork’s recipient, namely that her imagination generates a multitude of playful thoughts deriving from or in any other way (...)
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  20. Kant's Musical Antiformalism.James O. Young - 2020 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 78 (2):171-182.
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  21. Cognitive Interpretation of Kant’s Theory of Aesthetic Ideas.Mojca Kuplen - 2019 - Estetika 56 (12):48-64.
    The aim of my paper is to argue that Kant’s aesthetic ideas can help us to overcome cognitive limitations that we often experience in our attempts to articulate the meaning of abstract concepts. I claim that aesthetic ideas, as expressed in works of art, have a cognitive dimension in that they reveal the introspective, emotional, and affective aspects that appear to be central to the content of abstract phenomena.
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  22. Kant Über Einbildungskraft Und Schöne Kunst.Achim Vesper - 2019 - In Rudolf Meer, Giuseppe Motta & Gideon Stiening (eds.), Konzepte der Einbildungskraft in der Philosophie, den Wissenschaften und den Künsten des 18. Jahrhunderts. Berlin, Deutschland: De Gruyter. pp. 435-452.
    Ein Gemeinplatz der modernen Ästhetik besteht darin, dass sich die Produktivität des Künstlers einem entfesselten Gebrauch seiner Einbildungskraft verdankt. Nach dieser Vorstellung kann der Künstler neue Werke hervorbringen, weil er sich der assoziativen Kraft seiner Einbildungskraft überlässt. Als eine historische Quelle für die Auffassung, dass der Künstler in der Verwendung seiner Einbildungskraft von zwingenden Regeln frei ist, wird dabei oft Kants Genietheorie des Künstlers angesehen. Kant wird damit als Opponent der Regelpoetik Gottscheds und Vorbereiter der Genieauffassung der Romantik wahrgenommen. Tatsächlich (...)
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  23. Niebo gwiaździste nad Królewcem a prawo moralne. Dyskusja Gadamera z estetyką Kanta wokół kwestii doświadczenia piękna i jego odniesienia do etyki.Paweł Dybel - 2018 - Diametros 55:112-131.
    In the article, I engage with H.G.Gadamer’s reading of Kant’s aesthetic theory. Gadamer accused Kant of subjectivizing the aesthetic experience so that it would be reduced to the free play of the cognitive faculties of the subject. Consequently, the ethical dimension of aesthetic experience that played such an important role in the preceding tradition of European humanism has been lost. Yet, this charge of Gadamer is not quite right. The connection between the experience of beauty and ethics has been maintained (...)
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  24. Kiesewetter, Kant, and the Problem of Poetic Beauty.C. E. Emmer - 2018 - In Violetta L. Waibel, Margit Ruffing & David Wagner (eds.), Natur und Freiheit: Akten des XII. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses. Berlin, Germany: pp. 2979–2986.
    My observations here are meant to address a current lacuna in discussions of Kant's aesthetics, namely the beauty of poetry. There are, I admit, numerous treatments of poetry considered in the light of Kant's aesthetic theory, but what may not be noticed is that in discussions of poetry and Kant's aesthetics, the topic of poetic beauty only rarely comes up. This virtual silence on the beauty of poetry is surprising, given that the beautiful is obviously one of the two foundational (...)
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  25. The Moral Significance of Art in Kant's Critique of Judgment: Imagination and the Performance of Imperfect Duties.Wing Sze Leung - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 52 (3):87.
    Debates among contemporary philosophers and literary scholars on the moral value of representational art revolve around how art appreciation influences the audience—whether viewer or reader. Martha Nussbaum, a distinguished scholar in law and ethics who has initiated many lively dialogues on this subject, holds that we have a great deal to learn from literary works—in particular, realist novels—because they so concretely depict the ways in which personal and social circumstances shape human emotions, actions, and choices. While Charles Dickens’s Hard Times (...)
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  26. Kant on Fine Art, Genius and the Threat of Private Meaning.Aviv Reiter - 2018 - Kantian Review 23 (2):307-323.
  27. Natural Beauty, Fine Art and the Relation Between Them.Aviv Reiter & Ido Geiger - 2018 - Kant-Studien 109 (1):72-100.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Kant-Studien Jahrgang: 109 Heft: 1 Seiten: 72-100.
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  28. Why Didn’T Kant Think Highly of Music?Emine Hande Tuna - 2018 - In Violetta Waibel & Margit Ruffing (eds.), Natur und Freiheit: Akten des XII. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses. Berlin, Germany: De Gruyter. pp. 3141-3148.
    In this paper, in answering the question why Kant didn’t think very highly of music, I argue that for Kant (i) music unlike other art forms, lends itself more easily to combination judgments involving judgments of sense, which increases the propensity to make aesthetic mistakes and is ill-suited as an activity for improving one’s taste; (ii) music expresses aesthetic ideas and presents rational ideas only by taking advantage of existing associations while other art forms do so by breaking with the (...)
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  29. A „fogalom nélküli” szép és a művészet modern paradigmája.Gizela Horvath - 2016 - In Varga Rita Tánczos Péter (ed.), Tanulmányok Immanuel Kant aktualitásáról. ("...amennyiben szellemi lények vagyunk"). Budapest, Hungary: L'Harmattan. pp. 267-288.
  30. Is a Kantian Musical Formalism Possible?Thomas J. Mulherin - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (1):35-46.
    In this article, I consider whether a suitably stripped-down version of Kant's aesthetic theory could nevertheless provide philosophical foundations for musical formalism. I begin by distinguishing between formalism as a view about the nature of music and formalism as an approach to music criticism, arguing that Kant's aesthetics only rules out the former. Then, using an example from the work of musicologist and composer Edward T. Cone, I isolate the characteristics of formalist music criticism. With this characterization in mind, I (...)
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  31. A Kantian Theory of Art Criticism.Emine Hande Tuna - 2016 - Dissertation, University of Alberta
    I argue that Kant’s aesthetic theory yields a fruitful theory of art criticism and that this theory presents an alternative both to the existing theories of his time and to contemporary theories. In this regard, my dissertation offers an examination of a neglected area in Kant scholarship since it is standardly assumed that a theory of criticism flies in the face of some of Kant’s most central aesthetic tenets, such as his rejection of aesthetic testimony and general objective principles of (...)
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  32. A Kantian Hybrid Theory of Art Criticism: A Particularist Appeal to the Generalists.Emine Hande Tuna - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (4):397-411.
    Noël Carroll proposes a generalist theory of art criticism, which essentially involves evaluations of artworks on the basis of their success value, at the cost of rendering evaluations of reception value irrelevant to criticism. In this article, I argue for a hybrid account of art criticism, which incorporates Carroll's objective model but puts Carroll-type evaluations in the service of evaluations of reception value. I argue that this hybrid model is supported by Kant's theory of taste. Hence, I not only present (...)
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  33. Implications of Kant's Theories of Art for Developing Creative Identity in Students. Katz-Buonincontro - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 49 (4):1-18.
    In the Critique of the Power of Judgment, philosopher Immanuel Kant explored whether art can be learned, as well as the nature of aesthetic ideas that underpin the creative process of making art. Much the same way, teachers and professors still question whether artistic talent and creativity can be learned and how to foster students’ creativity in schools and universities. For example, some professors believe that students come into their classroom either possessing creativity or not possessing creativity,1 which resonates with (...)
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  34. Productive Excess: Aesthetic Ideas, Silence, and Community. Bradfield - 2014 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 48 (2):1-15.
    Due to the complexity of aesthetic ideas and the lack of a determinate concept that is adequate to the experience, we search for the words to describe our encounters with art. Sometimes, that search is in vain, and we have difficulty expressing ourselves. In such cases, we are so taken aback by the sheer amount of cognitive activity spurred by our aesthetic experience that we are silenced by art. Instead of viewing what happens in judgments of taste as “discursively mute,” (...)
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  35. Welche "Natur" gibt der Kunst die Regel? Zur Präsenz des spekulativen Vernunftbegriffs in Kants Kunstphilosophie.Max Gottschlich - 2013 - In S. Bacin (ed.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht. De Gruyter. pp. 71-84.
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  36. The Art of Willing: The Impact of Kant’s Aesthetics on Schopenhauer’s Conception of the Will.Alistair Welchman - 2013 - In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter. pp. 627-638.
    Much has been written about Schopenhauer’s use of Kant’s aesthetics as well as Schopenhauer’s adherence to and departures from Kant’s theoretical philosophy, not least by Schopenhauer himself. The hypothesis I propose in this paper combines these two research trajectories in a novel way: I wish to argue that Schopenhauer’s main theoretical innovation, the doctrine of the will, can be regarded as the development of an aspect of Kant’s aesthetic theory, specifically that the intransitive, goalless striving of the will in Schopenhauer (...)
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  37. Is There Kantian Art Criticism?Rachel Zuckert - 2013 - In Margit Ruffing, Claudio La Rocca, Alfredo Ferrarin & Stefano Bacin (eds.), Kant Und Die Philosophie in Weltbürgerlicher Absicht: Akten des Xi. Kant-Kongresses 2010. De Gruyter. pp. 343-356.
    Kant’s theory of taste might suggest that there cannot be any legitimate, useful art criticism, which guides others’ art appreciation: on the Kantian view, each of us must judge for him- or herself, autonomously, not follow the judgments of others; and no empirical concepts, or empirical knowledge, is supposed to be relevant for making a judgment of taste. Thus, it would seem, we should not follow others who have superior knowledge of art, because they have such knowledge. Despite these elements (...)
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  38. Geist and Communication in Kant's Theory of Aesthetic Ideas.Charles DeBord - 2012 - Kantian Review 17 (2):177-190.
    In his Critique of the Power of Judgement, Kant explicates the creation of works of fine art (schöne Kunst) in terms of aesthetic ideas. His analysis of aesthetic ideas claims that they are not concepts (Begriffe) and are therefore not definable or describable in determinate language. Nevertheless, Kant claims that aesthetic ideas are communicable via spirit (Geist), a special mental ability he associates with artistic genius. This paper argues that Kant's notion of Geist is central to his analysis of fine (...)
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  39. Celebrating Both Singularity and Commonality: The Exemplary Originality of the Kantian Genius.Yu Liu - 2012 - International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (1):99-116.
    Kant’s notion of genius and the related idea of exemplary originality in the Critique of Judgment have been read by Paul Guyer and Timothy Gould as implying azero-sum game in which all creative artists are willy-nilly patricidal in relation to their predecessors and suicidal in relation to their successors. By way of challenging this interesting but ultimately repugnant reading, and especially its modernist and postmodernist frame of reference, this essay takes a close look at Kant’s sustained interest in the monumental (...)
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  40. Do Negative Judgments of Taste Have a Priori Grounds in Kant?Christian Helmut Wenzel - 2012 - Kant-Studien 103 (4):472-493.
    When contrasting something with its opposite, such as positive numbers with negative numbers, repulsion with attraction, good and evil, beauty and ugliness, Kant some-times says the latter are not merely cases of negation or privation of the former, but that they have their own, independent grounds. But do negative judgments of taste really have a priori grounds? There are two kinds of negative judgments of taste: “This is not beautiful” and “This is ugly.” Can they be a priori judgments? Or (...)
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  41. Judgment in Contemporary Aesthetic Experience.Bernardo Barros Coelho de Oliveira - 2011 - Filosofia Unisinos 12 (1):38-47.
    The article presents central concepts of the “Critique of Aesthetic Judgment,” the first part of the Critique of Judgment by Kant, arguing for the possibility of a fruitful discussion between this work and the problems of aesthetic experience in the contemporary world. It emphasizes Kant’s claims about the judgments of taste concerning works of art and tries to remove some prejudices that hinder the dialogue between this work and current problems.
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  42. Introduction to Cosmological Aesthetics: The Kantian Sublime and Nietzschean Dionysian.Erman Kaplama - 2010 - International Journal of the Humanities 8 (2):69-84.
    This paper is founded on a close reading of Kant’s Opus Postumum in order both to explore the essential motivation that drove Kant to write a last comprehensive magnum opus and, by doing so, to show the essential link between his aesthetics and the idea of Übergang, the title of this last work. For this work contains not only his dynamical theory of matter defining motion as preliminary to the notions of space and time, and the advanced version of his (...)
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  43. Philosophers on Art From Kant to the Postmodernists: A Critical Reader.Christopher Want (ed.) - 2010 - Columbia University Press.
    Here, for the first time, Christopher Kul-Want brings together twenty-five texts on art written by twenty philosophers. Covering the Enlightenment to postmodernism, these essays draw on Continental philosophy and aesthetics, the Marxist intellectual tradition, and psychoanalytic theory, and each is accompanied by an overview and interpretation. The volume features Martin Heidegger on Van Gogh's shoes and the meaning of the Greek temple; Georges Bataille on Salvador Dal’'s The Lugubrious Game; Theodor W. Adorno on capitalism and collage; Walter Benjamin and Roland (...)
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  44. Ideal Embodiment. Kant's Theory of Sensibility.Angelica Nuzzo - 2008 - Indiana University Press.
    Angelica Nuzzo offers a comprehensive reconstruction of Kant's theory of sensibility in his three Critiques. By introducing the notion of "transcendental embodiment," Nuzzo proposes a new understanding of Kant's views on science, nature, morality, and art. She shows that the issue of human embodiment is coherently addressed and key to comprehending vexing issues in Kant's work as a whole. In this penetrating book, Nuzzo enters new terrain and takes on questions Kant struggled with: How does a body that feels pleasure (...)
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  45. Aesthetic Reflection and the Very Possibility of Art.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2007 - In Ian North (ed.), Visual Animals: Cross Overs, Evolution and New Aesthetics. Contemporary Art Centre of South Australia. pp. 73-83.
    If we conceive of ourselves as animals, it might be accurate to call us visual animals. The visual cortex is much larger in us relative to the size of our brains than in other animals, and large relative to the parts of the cortex responsible for the transmission of signals emanating from the other perceptual transducers. Our ability to recall visual images, recombine them in imagination and enter imaginatively into narratives is linked to this evolved piece of brain architecture. However, (...)
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  46. Conflit et dialectique des sentiments dans la fiancée de Messine de Schiller.Giovanna Pinna - 2006 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 77 (2):237.
  47. Kant on Painting and the Representation of the Sublime.Gabriele Tomasi - 2005 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 5 (3):545-567.
    The essay deals with the question of how works of art that evoke a sense of the sublime are to be analysed in terms of Kant’s theory. Although Kant assumes the possibility of a beautiful representation of the sublime, of a sublime “shaped by beauty”, that a work can appear sublime is not immediately clear. Contrapurposiveness plays a key role in the experience of the sublime, but art is an essentially purposive context and aims at beauty. Following readings such as (...)
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  48. An Introduction to Kant's Aesthetics: Core Concepts and Problems.Christian Helmut Wenzel - 2005 - New York (USA), Oxford (UK): Wiley-Blackwell.
    In _An Introduction to Kant’s Aesthetics_, Christian Wenzel discusses and demystifies Kant’s Critique of the Power of Judgment, guiding the reader each step of the way and placing key points of discussion in the context of Kant’s other work. Explains difficult concepts in plain language, using numerous examples and a helpful glossary. Proceeds in the same order as Kant’s text for ease of reference and comprehension. Includes an illuminating foreword by Henry E. Allison. Offers twenty-six further-reading sections, commenting briefly on (...)
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  49. Kant, Art, and Art History: Moments of Discipline. [REVIEW]Robert Wicks - 2003 - Dialogue 42 (3):604-606.
    In the first sentence of his thematically innovative book, Mark A. Cheetham informs us that Kant, Art, and Art History “examines the far-reaching and varied reception of Immanuel Kant’s thought in art history and the practicing visual arts from the late eighteenth century to the present”. This is surely a long-overdue project in Kant scholarship, and Cheetham deserves praise for having finally put this intellectual ball into play. He then sets one of his methodological assumptions squarely on the table: “there (...)
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  50. Kant, Art, and Art History: Moments of Discipline.Mark A. Cheetham New York: Cambridge University Press, 2001, X + 222 Pp., $54.95. [REVIEW]Robert Wicks - 2003 - Dialogue 42 (3):604-607.
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