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  1. Art and Objects: A Manifesto.Said Mikki - manuscript
    We develop a series of theses on the philosophical aesthetics of design art. A sketch of an outline of a theory of objects is drawn from within a naturalistic worldview, that of abstract materialism and the general, still ongoing, quest to build a comprehensive philosophy of nature encompassing not only the physical world, but also culture, art, and politics.
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  2. The Achievement of Neglect and the Ontology of Artworks.Matthew Rowe - manuscript
    of (from British Columbia Philosophy Graduate Conference) The paper seeks to reconcile a folk sentiment and a commonplace within aesthetics that may be in tension: The sentiment that our creations can sustain beyond our own lifetimes as a legacy of our lives and the commonplace that some artworks can be made, and exist as artworks within an artist’s mind, without being articulated in a publicly accessible medium. It does this through denying that artworks can exist as the content of thoughts, (...)
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  3. “Martin Creed: Conceptual Art and More”.Elisa Caldarola - forthcoming - In Davide Dal Sasso & Elisabeth Schellekens (ed.), Aesthetics, Philosophy and Martin Creed. Londra, Regno Unito:
    In this paper, I put forward a philosophical analysis of some works by Martin Creed. I suggest that all the works under consideration are works of conceptual art as well as of installation art, and that they display significant expressive properties. The paper is structured as follows: in the first section, I claim that the works are ontologically similar and that they all appear problematic, because it is not very clear how they should be appreciated as artworks; in the second (...)
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  4. Yale Gallery Talk, Language Perception and Representation.PhD Tanya Kelley - forthcoming - Https://Drive.Google.Com/File/D/1YHzX_YR_wOWC3JUvfBcW7KucWX0Wlr_o/View.
    Yale Gallery Talk, Language Perception and Representation Tanya Kelley and James Prosek Linguist and artist Tanya Kelley, Ph.D., and artist, writer, and naturalist James Prosek, B.A. 1997, discuss color manuals used by artist-naturalists and biologists and lead visitors in close looking and drawing. Presented in conjunction with the exhibition James Prosek: Art, Artifact, Artifice. Space is limited. Open to: General Public .
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  5. Computer Art, Technology, and the Medium.Christopher Bartel - 2022 - Being and Value in Technology.
    Technological advancements often lead to revolutions in the creation of art; but, what is unclear is whether such advancements always correspond to revolutions regarding the artistic medium. The notion of an artistic medium is central to our thinking about, engagement with, and appreciation of art. Accounts of the interpretation, understanding, and experience of art must at some point grapple with the role of the artistic medium against such endeavors. Moreover, artists do not choose their medium by accident, but presumably do (...)
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  6. Art, Aesthetics, and the Medium: Comments for Nguyen on the Art-Status of Games.Christopher Bartel - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (3):321-331.
    Nguyen offers a number of profound insights about the nature and value of games. Games are works of art, according to Nguyen, because they offer players aesthetic experiences. Game designers aim to...
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  7. Erotic Art as Proprioceptive Art.Jiri Benovsky - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (2):247-258.
    The philosophical discussion about erotic art has often been understood in terms of the possibility of erotic art as a form of visual or auditory art. In this article, I focus on erotic experiences qua proprioceptive experiences and I defend the claim that, under the right circumstances, such experiences can bring about proprioceptive artworks.
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  8. The Artistic Metaphor.Daisy Dixon - 2021 - Philosophy 96 (1):1-25.
    Philosophical analysis of metaphor in the non-linguistic arts has been biased towards what I call the ‘aesthetic metaphor’: metaphors in non-linguistic art are normally understood as being completely formed by the work's internal content, that is, by its perceptual and aesthetic properties such as its images. I aim to unearth and analyse a neglected type of metaphor also used by the non-linguistic arts: the ‘artistic metaphor’, as I call it. An artistic metaphor is composed by an artwork's internal content, but (...)
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  9. The Fine-Grainedness of Poetry: A New Argument Against the Received View.Daniela Glavaničová & Miloš Kosterec - 2021 - Analysis 81 (2):224-231.
    This paper formulates a new argument against the received view in the philosophy of poetry. The received view consists of three tenets: the unity of poetic form and poetic content; the impossibility of paraphrasing and translating poetry; and the hyperintensionality of poetry. We will explore the same detour via direct quotation that has been used by proponents of the received view. We will argue that the hyperintensionality and unity of quotation do not guarantee its untranslatability, and thus that the inference (...)
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  10. Authorship and Creation.Nurbay Irmak - 2021 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 79 (2):175-185.
    Artworks have authors. According to Christy Mag Uidhir, this simple assumption has significant consequences for the ontology of artworks. One such consequence is that artworks cannot be identified with abstract entities: if there are works of art, they are concrete entities. Therefore, one cannot create an abstract work of art. Mag Uidhir presents a novel challenge against abstract creationism, the view that certain kinds of art objects are abstract artifacts. This article has two aims. First, it provides a defense of (...)
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  11. Ready Player One? A Response to Ricksand.Andrew Kania - 2021 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 79 (3):388-391.
    I respond to Martin Ricksand’s recommendation that my arguments that current, typical video games are not works for performance be replaced with an argument that no video game could possibly be a work for performance. I cast doubt both on Ricksand’s premise that all video games are games, and on his arguments that no game could be a work for performance.
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  12. The Pragmatic Constraint and Revisionary Ontologies of Art.Eric Wilkinson - 2021 - American Society for Aesthetics Graduate E-Journal 13 (1):19-22.
    At the heart of Anders Pettersson’s 2017 book, The Idea of a Text and the Nature of Textual Meaning, is his proposed “cluster” definition of a textual work. On this view, a text is a cluster of three kinds of objects: all the physical exemplars of the work, the work’s meaning, and the complex signs that convey that meaning. Pettersson contrasts this with the “ordinary conception” of a text, wherein a text is a unitary object made of the signs and (...)
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  13. Has André Malraux’s Imaginary Museum Come Into its Own?Derek Allan - 2020 - Apollo, an International Art Magazine.
    A brief discussion of André Malraux's concept of the musée imaginaire (Imaginary Museum or Museum without Walls) and a comment on the neglect of Malraux's theory of art. (Link provided).
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  14. The Limits of Art: On Borderline Cases of Artworks and Their Aesthetic Properties.Jiri Benovsky - 2020 - Springer.
    This open access book is about exploring interesting borderline cases of art. It discusses the cases of gustatory and olfactory artworks, proprioceptive artworks, intellectual artworks, as well as the vague limits between painting and photography. The book focuses on the author’s research about what counts as art and what does not, as well as on the nature of these limits. Overall, the author defends a very inclusive view, 'extending' the limits of art, and he argues for its virtues. Some of (...)
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  15. Filosofia dell'arte contemporanea: installazioni, siti, oggetti.Elisa Caldarola - 2020 - 62100 Macerata MC, Italia: Quodlibet.
    L’arte contemporanea è caleidoscopica: può catapultarci in ambienti complessi o minimali richiedendo la nostra attiva partecipazione, ancorarsi a luoghi particolari, porci di fronte a opere apparentemente indistinguibili da oggetti ed eventi della vita quotidiana, appropriarsi illegalmente degli spazi pubblici, e così via. Questo volume muove dalla premessa che uno dei compiti della filosofia dell’arte sia prestare attenzione a specifiche pratiche artistiche e a teorie sull’arte avanzate in altri ambiti di ricerca, per poi organizzare in maniera perspicua la molteplicità dei dati (...)
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  16. On Being Moved by Portraits of Unknown People.Hans Maes - 2020 - In Portraits and Philosophy. Routledge.
    In a chapter that hones in on certain Renaissance portraits by Hans Holbein, Giorgione, and Jan van Scorel, Hans Maes examines how it is that we can be deeply moved by such portraits, despite (or perhaps because of) the fact that we don’t know anything about their sitters. Standard explanations in terms of the revelation of an inner self or the recreation of a physical presence prove to be insuffi cient. Instead, Maes provides a more rounded account of what makes (...)
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  17. The Arts of Action.C. Thi Nguyen - 2020 - Philosophers' Imprint 20 (14):1-27.
    The theory and culture of the arts has largely focused on the arts of objects, and neglected the arts of action – the “process arts”. In the process arts, artists create artifacts to engender activity in their audience, for the sake of the audience’s aesthetic appreciation of their own activity. This includes appreciating their own deliberations, choices, reactions, and movements. The process arts include games, urban planning, improvised social dance, cooking, and social food rituals. In the traditional object arts, the (...)
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  18. Can Kant’s Aesthetics Accommodate Conceptual Art? A Reply to Costello.Ioannis Trisokkas - 2020 - Con-Textos Kantianos 12:226-247.
    Diarmuid Costello has recently argued that, contra received opinion, Kant’s aesthetics can accommodate conceptual art, as well as all other art. Costello offers an interpretation of Kant’s art theory that demands from all art a minimal structure involving three basic “players” and three basic “actions” corresponding to those “players.” The article takes issue with the “action” assigned by Costello’s Kant to the artwork’s recipient, namely that her imagination generates a multitude of playful thoughts deriving from or in any other way (...)
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  19. What Is an Instance of an Artwork?Alexey Aliyev - 2019 - Estetika 56 (2):163-185.
    The expression ‘an instance of an artwork’ is often used in philosophical discourse about art. Yet there is no clear account of what exactly this expression means. My goal in this essay is to provide such an account. I begin by expounding and defending a particular definition of the concept of ‘an instance of an artwork’. Next, I elaborate this definition – by providing definitions of the main derivatives of the concept of ‘an instance of an artwork’, namely the concepts (...)
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  20. Strategies of Irreproducibility.Emanuele Arielli - 2019 - Proceedings of the European Society for Aesthetics 11:60-76.
    In this paper I focus on the topic of reproducibility (and irreproducibility) of aesthetic experience and effects, distinguishing it from the traditional subject of artifact reproducibility. The main aim is to outline a typology of the various kind of irreproducibility of aesthetic experience and to draw some implications for the aesthetic discussion concerning contemporary art. Depending on the type of artwork, we can define the difference (or the “ratio”) between aesthetic experience in the presence of the artwork and aesthetic experience (...)
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  21. “An Argument Against a Meta-Ontology of Art Inspired by Peter Lamarque’s Reading of Jean Paul Sartre”.Elisa Caldarola - 2019 - Aesthetica Preprint 111:85-96.
    As Peter Lamarque explains in "Work and Object", the claim that artworks are not identical with their vehicles lies at the core of a variety of art-ontological accounts, including Jean-Paul Sartre’s one. In chapter 10, Lamarque gives us an insightful read-ing of Sartre’s art-ontological proposal: works of art in themselves do not exist, while what exists is their ‘material analogue’ which, when perceived, arouses in us certain imaginings. What we call ‘artwork’ is the object of such imaginings – an object (...)
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  22. Double Portraiture.Eleen M. Deprez & Michael Newall - 2019 - In Hans Maes (ed.), Portraits and Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 81-96.
    This chapter examines the nature and artistic quality of double portraits. Double portraiture poses unexpected and interesting challenges to existing philosophical accounts of portraiture. We give an account of double portraiture as involving the representation of a significant relationship between two subjects, and an expression of its character. The account argues that a picture with two single portraits does not necessarily make a double portrait, and that a double portrait does not have to contain two single portraits. We then show (...)
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  23. Are Musical Works Sound Structures?Vitor Guerreiro - 2019 - Filozofija I Društvo 30 (1):36-53.
    This paper is about the dilemma raised against musical ontology by Roger Scruton, in his The Aesthetics of Music: either musical ontology is about certain mind-independent “things” and so music is left out of the picture, or it is about an “intentional object” and so its puzzles are susceptible of an arbitrary answer. I argue the dilemma is merely apparent and deny that musical works can be identified with sound structures, whether or not conceived as abstract entities. The general idea (...)
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  24. Jeffrey Strayer, "Haecceities: Essentialism, Identity, and Abstraction." Reviewed By.Phil Jenkins - 2019 - Philosophy in Review 39 (2):108-110.
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  25. Beauty Always Dies: The Philosophical Significance of Nonenduring Artworks.Troy Jollimore - 2019 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 44 (1):213-230.
    Midwest Studies In Philosophy, Volume 44, Issue 1, Page 213-230, December 2019.
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  26. The Ancient Quarrel Between Art and Philosophy in Contemporary Exhibitions of Visual Art.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2019 - Curator: The Museum Journal 62 (1):7-17.
    At a time when professional art criticism is on the wane, the ancient quarrel between art and philosophy demands fresh answers. Professional art criticism provided a basis upon which to distinguish apt experiences of art from the idiosyncratic. However, currently the kind of narratives from which critics once drew are underplayed or discarded in contemporary exhibition design where the visual arts are concerned. This leaves open the possibility that art operates either as mere stimulant to private reverie or, in the (...)
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  27. The Right Way to Play a Game.C. Thi Nguyen - 2019 - Game Studies 19 (1).
    Is there a right or wrong way to play a game? Many think not. Some have argued that, when we insist that players obey the rules of a game, we give too much weight to the author’s intent. Others have argued that such obedience to the rules violates the true purpose of games, which is fostering free and creative play. Both of these responses, I argue, misunderstand the nature of games and their rules. The rules do not tell us how (...)
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  28. What 4′33″ Also Is: A Response to Dodd.Matteo Ravasio - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 97 (2):395-400.
    Julian Dodd [2018] persuasively argues that John Cage’s 4′33″ should be characterised as a silent piece, as opposed to a sonically replete piece, containing the environmental sounds that occur as it is performed; a piece of performance art, but not a piece of music; a work of conceptual art. While I agree with Dodd’s claims, I contend that he fails to account for two features of 4′33″. I argue that a qualified description of Cage’s work as belonging to a subgenre (...)
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  29. Meriting a Response: The Paradox of Seductive Artworks.Nils-Hennes Stear - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 97 (3):465-482.
    According to what I call the Merit Principle, roughly, works of art that attempt to elicit unmerited responses fail on their own terms and are thereby aesthetically flawed. A horror film, for instance, that attempts to elicit fear towards something that is not scary is to that extent aesthetically flawed. The Merit Principle is not only intuitive, it is also endorsed in some form by Aristotle, David Hume, and numerous contemporary figures. In this paper, I show how the principle leads (...)
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  30. Visual Experiences in Cinquecento Theatrical Spaces.Javier Berzal de Dios - 2018 - Toronto, ON, Canada: University of Toronto Press.
    Through an interdisciplinary examination of sixteenth-century theatre, Visual Experiences in Cinquecento Theatrical Spaces studies the performative aspects of the early modern stage, paying special attention to the overlooked complexities of audience experience. Examining the period’s philosophical and aesthetic ideas about space, place, and setting, the book shows how artists consciously moved away from traditional representations of real spaces on stage, instead providing their audiences with more imaginative and collaborative engagements that were untethered by strict definitions of naturalism. In this way, (...)
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  31. Review of Victoria S. Harrison, Anna Bergqvist and Gary Kemp (Eds.), Philosophy and Museums: Essays on the Philosophy of Museums, Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews, 2018. [REVIEW]Elisa Caldarola - 2018 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2018.
    This volume collects fifteen essays debating the value of museums, the ontology and epistemology of exhibited objects, and museum ethics. The essays stem from talks originally given at a conference at the University of Glasgow in 2013 by philosophers working both within and outside the analytic tradition, museum scholars, and museum practitioners. The collection succeeds in showing that we need a philosophy of museums to improve our understanding of such institutions.
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  32. Psychologism About Artistic Plans: A Response to Rohrbaugh.Wesley D. Cray - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (1):101-104.
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  33. Art and Interpretation.Szu-Yen Lin - 2018 - The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Interpretation in art refers to the attribution of meaning to a work. A point on which people often disagree is whether the artist’s or author’s intention is relevant to the interpretation of the work. In the Anglo-American analytic philosophy of art, views about interpretation branch into two major camps: intentionalism and anti-intentionalism, with an initial focus on one art, namely literature. -/- This article elaborates on variations on these theories of interpretation and considers their notable objections. The debate about interpretation (...)
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  34. Contemporary Kitsch: The Death of Pseudo-Art and the Birth of Everyday Cheesiness (A Postcolonial Inquiry).Max Ryynänen - 2018 - Terra Aestheticae: Journal of Russian Society for Aesthetics 1 (1):70-86.
    The discourse on kitsch has changed tone. The concept, which in the early 20th century referred more to pretentious pseudo-art than to cute everyday objects, was attacked between the World Wars by theorists of modernity (e.g. Greenberg on Repin). The late 20th century scholars gazed at it with critical curiosity (Eco, Kulka, Calinescu). What we now have is a profound interest in and acceptance of cute mass-produced objects. It has become marginal to use the concept to criticize pseudo-art. Scholars who (...)
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  35. Assessing Socially Engaged Art.Vid Simoniti - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 76 (1):71-82.
    The last twenty-five years have seen a radical shift in the work of politically committed artists. No longer content to merely represent social reality, a new generation of artists has sought to change it, blending art with activism, social regeneration projects, and even violent political action. I assess how this form of contemporary art should lead us to rethink theories of artistic value and argue that these works make a convincing case for an often-dismissed position, namely, the pragmatic view of (...)
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  36. The Substitution Principle Revisited.Jakub Stejskal - 2018 - Source: Notes in the History of Art 37 (3):150-157.
    In their Anachronic Renaissance, Alexander Nagel and Christopher Wood identify two principles upon which, in fifteenth-century Europe, a work of art might establish its validity or authority: substitution and performance. It has become established wisdom that the dual schema of substitution and performance follows Hans Belting's dualism of the medieval cult of the image and the modern aesthetic system of art. This, I submit, is not just a mistake, but also prevents from evaluating one of the book's most ambitious contributions (...)
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  37. A New Conception of 'Art'.Jakob Zaaiman - 2018
    The traditional conception of art is about sensual beauty and refined taste; modern art on the other hand has introduced an entirely unexpected dimension to the visual arts, namely that of ‘revelatory narrative’. Classical art aspires to present works which can be appreciated as sensually beautiful; modern art, when it succeeds, presents us instead with the unsettling narrative. This radical difference in artistic purpose is something relatively new, and not yet fully appreciated or understood.
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  38. Editors' Introduction.Jussi Backman, Harri Mäcklin & Raine Vasquez - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 4 (2):93-99.
    A brief overview of the current status of the scholarship on Heidegger and contemporary art and of the contributions included in the special issue.
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  39. Artistic Medium.Wack Daniel - 2017 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Artistic medium is an art critical concept that first arose in 18th century European discourse about art. Medium analysis has, historically, attempted to identify that out of which works of art and, more generally, art forms are created, in order to better articulate norms or standards by which works of art and art forms can be evaluated. Since the 19th century, medium analysis has emerged in two different forms of art critical and theoretical discourse. Within traditional art forms such as (...)
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  40. Psychologism and Completeness in the Arts.Guy Rohrbaugh - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (2):131-141.
    When is an artwork complete? Most hold that the correct answer to this question is psychological in nature. A work is said to be complete just in case the artist regards it as complete or is appropriately disposed to act as if he or she did. Even though this view seems strongly supported by metaphysical, epistemological, and normative considerations, this article argues that such psychologism about completeness is mistaken, fundamentally, because it cannot make sense of the artist's own perspective on (...)
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  41. Why Do We Need to Define ‘Art’ ? Because It Greatly Enhances the Encounter with Art Itself.Jakob Zaaiman - 2017 - Alldaynight.Info.
    Modern art has yet to be properly explained and given its own distinctive and authentic philosophy. It is almost always portrayed – openly or subliminally – as if it were somehow striving for much the same objectives as classical art, though perhaps by very different means. This has the effect of making modern artworks look slightly ridiculous in comparison with the grandeur of their classical counterparts, at the same time as making it an uphill struggle to try to argue the (...)
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  42. Commissioning the Artwork: From Singular Authorship to Collective Creatorship.Katerina Bantinaki - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (1):16-33.
    A specific type of collaboration has become prevalent in contemporary art: in this type of collaboration—henceforth, commissioning—an artist assigns the production of the work of art to skilled craftsmen or unskilled workers, directing their labor through instructions or blueprints. Commissioning has been accepted by the art world as a legitimate mode of artistic production—legitimate in the sense that it does not undermine the authenticity of the work as a creation of the artist, even if she has not laid a hand (...)
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  43. In Search of the Ontological Common Core of Artworks: Radical Embodiment and Non-Universalization.Gianluca Consoli - 2016 - Estetika 53 (1):14-41.
    I propose that artworks represent a specific and homogeneous ontological kind, grounded in a common ontological core. I call this common core ‘non-universalizable embodied meaning’, and I argue that this common core explains how artworks unfold their ontological identity at the physical, intentional, and social levels on the basis of an original and irreducible mode of material embodiment and cultural emergence; this common core functions as the constitutive rule of art and institutes an axiological normativity, that is, normativity based on (...)
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  44. Presentación. La estética y el arte de la Academia a la Academia.José Ramón Fabelo Corzo - 2016 - In José Ramón Fabelo Corzo & Eliecer Eduardo Alejo Herrera (eds.), La estética y el arte de la Academia a la Academia. Puebla, Pue., México: pp. 11-14.
    Con este volumen de la serie Academia y egresados, la Colección La Fuente ofrece una selección de los trabajos presentados en junio de 2014 en el III Encuentro de Egresados de la Maestría en Estética y Arte de la BUAP. El encuentro resultó ser inter-académico, por las diversas procedencias institucionales tanto de los conferencistas invitados, como de los propios exalumnos. De ahí el título general del libro, que también busca expresar la circularidad total de un movimiento que nace en la (...)
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  45. Realismus, materialismus a umění.Tomas Hribek - 2016 - Sešit Pro Umění, Teorii a Příbuzné Zóny 21:38-66.
    [Realism, Materialism, and Art] Recent years have seen the ascendance of a new trend in continental philosophy called “the speculative turn”, “speculative realism”, “continental materialism”, or “object-oriented ontology” (OOO). I focus on the work of one of the proponents of this new trend, Graham Harman, in particular his recent attempt to extend his “object-oriented” approach to art and aesthetics. In part 1, I start with a brief characterization of the new trend in terms of the shared opposition of all its (...)
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  46. Wedge: A Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration by Janine Antoni and Jill Sigman.Sherri Irvin - 2016 - In Sondra Bacharach, Jeremy Neil Booth & Siv B. Fjærestad (eds.), Collaborative Art in the Twenty-First Century. Routledge. pp. 166-178.
    In 2012, choreographer and dancer Jill Sigman of jill sigman/thinkdance and visual artist Janine Antoni collaborated to produce Wedge, a live performance at the Albright-Knox Gallery. In this essay, I describe the collaboration and the resulting work and examine the benefits and challenges of the collaboration. The discussion touches on broader issues pertaining to collaboration, co-authorship, artists' intentions, and interpretation.
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  47. Yosman Botero y Postcolombino.Carlos Vanegas - 2016 - Co-herencia:301-303.
    La obra de Yosman Botero siempre ha orbitado entre paradojas. Desde los mismos lugares suplementarios de su obra, como los títulos de sus series Full of Emptiness (2013), Immaterial matter (2014) y Postcolombino (2016) se plantea una encrucijada tanto de la “supervivencia de las imágenes” del arte como de su capacidad comunicativa de la realidad: ya sea esta la experiencia del arte o la realidad social colombiana, o lo que sea que entendemos por “lo real”, tan cara a las propuestas (...)
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  48. The Curator as Artist: Reply to Sue Spaid.Rossen Ventzislavov - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (1):91-95.
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  49. ‘But is It Art ?’ The Search for a Simple, Practical and Illuminating Answer.Jakob Zaaiman - 2016 - Alldaynight.Info.
    ‘Art’ still needs a practical, useful definition, not of the academic variety, but rather of the plain and simple sort that you can usefully take with you into a gallery, and apply directly to what you see. People want to know, with a basic clarity, what it is they are looking at, and how to judge the good from the bad. Because if you don’t know what ‘art’ is, and you think it’s all about ‘classical fine crafting’, then you are (...)
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  50. How to Understand Modern Contemporary Art, Enjoy It, and Not Be Fooled.Jakob Zaaiman - 2016 - Alldaynight. Info.
    Modern contemporary art remains a mystery because most people – including art critics and even artists themselves – are unable to see beyond the imprisoning confines of classical fine art. Everything is judged in terms of beauty and technical skill, when it should be viewed from a quite different perspective, namely that of the imaginative world that the modern artwork is a part of. Successful and authentic modern art is about creating worlds of the imagination - like a film, or (...)
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