Results for 'transplant organ distribution'

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  1.  19
    Justice in Transplant Organ Allocation.Rosamond Rhodes - 2002 - In Rosamond Rhodes, Margaret P. Battin & Anita Silvers (eds.), Medicine and Social Justice: Essays on the Distribution of Health Care. Oup Usa. pp. 345--361.
  2.  31
    Organ Transplantation: New Regulations to Alter Distribution of Organs.Daniel Luke Geyser - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (1):95-98.
    On December 17, 1999, President Clinton signed the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999, which instituted a 90-day comment period for the amended Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network Final Rule, a comprehensive set of guidelines that would affect how organs are allocated throughout the country. Barring further legislative action, the Final Rule, which has been over five years in the making, will be effective on March 16,2000.The Final Rule, issued by the Department of Health and (...)
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  3.  9
    Organ Transplantation: New Regulations to Alter Distribution of Organs.Daniel Luke Geyser - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (1):95-98.
    On December 17, 1999, President Clinton signed the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999, which instituted a 90-day comment period for the amended Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network Final Rule, a comprehensive set of guidelines that would affect how organs are allocated throughout the country. Barring further legislative action, the Final Rule, which has been over five years in the making, will be effective on March 16,2000.The Final Rule, issued by the Department of Health and (...)
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  4.  26
    Organs for Undocumented Aliens—Another Look: Response to “Distributing American Hearts for Transplantation: The Predicament of Living in the Global Village” by Henry S. Perkins. [REVIEW]Richard A. Demme - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (2):281.
  5.  11
    Fair Distribution and Patients Who Receive More Than One Organ Transplant.Barbara J. Russell - 2002 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 13 (1):40.
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  6. Should We Allow Organ Donation Euthanasia? Alternatives for Maximizing the Number and Quality of Organs for Transplantation.Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (1):32-48.
    There are not enough solid organs available to meet the needs of patients with organ failure. Thousands of patients every year die on the waiting lists for transplantation. Yet there is one currently available, underutilized, potential source of organs. Many patients die in intensive care following withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment whose organs could be used to save the lives of others. At present the majority of these organs go to waste.In this paper we consider and evaluate a range of (...)
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  7.  38
    Equality Vs. Efficiency: The Geography of Solid Organ Distribution in the Usa.Tom Koch & Ken Denike - 2001 - Ethics, Place and Environment 4 (1):45 – 56.
    There is at present a divide in the geographical literature between those interested in distributive justice as a social value and those who seek to implement distributive plans on the basis of efficiency of resource use. The former are 'social geographers' interested in equity as a social value, and the latter are 'practical' economic and locational geographers. This divide mirrors one existing elsewhere in social science between Rawlsian liberalism and utilitarian planners. Here we argue that equality and efficiency are related (...)
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  8. Ethical Considerations in Organ Transplants.David L. Perry - manuscript
    The ability to keep someone alive by replacing one or more of their major organs is an astounding achievement of 20th-century medicine. Unfortunately, the current supply of transplant organs is much lower than the need or demand for them, which means that thousands of people die every year in the U.S. alone for lack of a replacement organ.
     
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  9.  41
    Organ Transplants, Death, and Policies for Procurement.David Lamb - 1993 - The Monist 76 (2):203-221.
    Organ transplantation has given hope when formerly death was inevitable. But the replacement of vital organs highlights major moral and philosophical problems in medicine concerning the role of physicians and nurses, patient autonomy, and respect for the dying and the dead. These include the morality of excising organs from a healthy donor, and related problems regarding an individual’s consent to have organs removed for the benefit of others. These problems are not restricted to live organ donation: cadaveric (...) removal raises problems over the definition of death, and raises further questions of fundamental moral and philosophical concern over the procurement and distribution of organs. Guiding decisions in these areas is a mass of empirical knowledge, scientific theory, and philosophical beliefs concerning what it means to say that someone is dead or alive, or whether given persons are competent to make a decision, or whether other considerations should override a competent decision. These questions call for investigation of conceptual matters and moral principles, and are by no means exclusively determined by medical expertise. (shrink)
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  10.  9
    Organverteilungssysteme Im Transplantationswesen Aus Ökonomischer SichtOrgan Distribution Systems for Transplantation – an Economic Perspective.Wolfgang Greiner - 1998 - Ethik in der Medizin 10 (2):64-73.
    Definition of the problem: Even after the new German legislation about organ donors and transplantation (“information solution”), the question of criteria for distributing the organs is still not solved. The various alternatives to solve this problem face different social acceptance and economic efficiency.Arguments: Medical criteria (e.g. HLA compatibility) and non-medical criteria (e.g. willingness to pay of the patients) are valued on the basis of generally accepted objectives (e.g. equal access to health services or low costs). As an innovative form (...)
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  11.  43
    Drinking in the Last Chance Saloon: Luck Egalitarianism, Alcohol Consumption, and the Organ Transplant Waiting List.Andreas Albertsen - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (2):325-338.
    The scarcity of livers available for transplants forces tough choices upon us. Lives for those not receiving a transplant are likely to be short. One large group of potential recipients needs a new liver because of alcohol consumption, while others suffer for reasons unrelated to their own behaviour. Should the former group receive lower priority when scarce livers are allocated? This discussion connects with one of the most pertinent issues in contemporary political philosophy; the role of personal responsibility in (...)
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  12.  61
    Egalitarian and Maximin Theories of Justice: Directed Donation of Organs for Transplant.Robert M. Veatch - 1998 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (5):456 – 476.
    It is common to interpret Rawls's maximin theory of justice as egalitarian. Compared to utilitarian theories, this may be true. However, in special cases practices that distribute resources so as to benefit the worst off actually increase the inequality between the worst off and some who are better off. In these cases the Rawlsian maximin parts company with what is here called true egalitarianism. A policy question requiring a distinction between maximin and "true egalitarian" allocations has arisen in the arena (...)
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  13.  27
    Verteilungsgerechtigkeit in der Transplantationsmedizin: Was Kann Die Soziologie Beitragen?Distributive Justice in Transplant Medicine: What Can Sociology Contribute?Volker H. Schmidt - 1998 - Ethik in der Medizin 10 (1):5-11.
    Definition of the problem: The article discusses the ways in which sociological analyses can contribute to the problem of a just allocation of scarce donor organs.Arguments: It is argued that this contribution consists primarily in the demonstration of the ethical, rather than medical nature of the problem itself. Only if its ethical nature is acknowledged will it be possible to come to a proper understanding of the several dilemmas involved and to consider adequate means for handling them.
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  14.  76
    Direct Organ Solicitation Deserves Reconsideration.J. P. Lott - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (9):558-558.
    The United Network for Organ Sharing , the national organisation responsible for transplantable organ distribution in the United States, recently condemned the direct solicitation of organs in situations “where no personal bond exists between the patient and the donor or donor family”.1 UNOS worries that “such appeals, although well-intentioned, compromise the principle of fairness” or worse, “may divert organs from patients with critical need to those who are less ill.”.
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  15. Should Convicted Criminals Receive Heart Transplants?David Perry - 2002 - Santa Clara Magazine (Fall).
    According to the United Network for Organ Sharing http://www.unos.org), over 4,100 Americans are currently candidates for heart transplants, meaning that they desperately need them, they satisfy the criteria for "medical utility" (i.e., a transplant will probably keep them alive), and they have adequate insurance or other funding to cover their cost. Unfortunately the supply of hearts in this country doesn't even come close to meeting the demand: only 2,202 heart transplants were performed last year. Thus, every day some (...)
     
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  16.  24
    Factors Encouraging and Inhibiting Organ Donation in Israel: The Public View and the Contribution of Legislation and Public Policy.Daniel Sperling & Gabriel M. Gurman - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (4):479-497.
    Although transplantation surgeries are relatively successful and save the lives of many, only few are willing to donate organs. In order to better understand the reasons for donation or refusing donation and their implications on and influence by public policy, we conducted a survey examining public views on this issue in Israel. Between January and June 2010, an anonymous questionnaire based on published literature was distributed among random and selected parts of Israeli society and included organ recipients, organ (...)
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  17.  33
    Evaluating the Legality of Age-Based Criteria in Health Care: From Nondiscrimination and Discretion to Distributive Justice.Govind Persad - 2019 - Boston College Law Review 60 (3):889-949.
    Recent disputes over whether older people should pay more for health insurance, or receive lower priority for transplantable organs, highlight broader disagreements regarding the legality of using age-based criteria in health care. These debates will likely intensify given the changing age structure of the American population and the turmoil surrounding the financing of American health care. This Article provides a comprehensive examination of the legality and normative desirability of age-based criteria. I defend a distributive justice approach to age-based criteria and (...)
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  18. Why and How to Compensate Living Organ Donors: Ethical Implications of the New Australian Scheme.Alberto Giubilini - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (4):283-290.
    The Australian Federal Government has announced a two-year trial scheme to compensate living organ donors. The compensation will be the equivalent of six weeks paid leave at the rate of the national minimum wage. In this article I analyse the ethics of compensating living organ donors taking the Australian scheme as a reference point. Considering the long waiting lists for organ transplantations and the related costs on the healthcare system of treating patients waiting for an organ, (...)
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  19.  3
    Organ Donation and the Divine Lien in Talmudic Law.Madeline Kochen - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers a new theory of property and distributive justice derived from Talmudic law, illustrated by a case study involving the sale of organs for transplant. Although organ donation did not exist in late antiquity, this book posits a new way, drawn from the Talmud, to conceive of this modern means of giving to others. Our common understanding of organ transfers as either a gift or sale is trapped in a dichotomy that is conceptually and philosophically (...)
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  20. Should a Criminal Receive a Heart Transplant? Medical Justice Vs. Societal Justice.Lawrence J. Schneiderman & Nancy S. Jecker - 1996 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (1).
    Should the nation provide expensive care and scarce organs to convicted felons? We distinguish between two fields of justice: Medical Justice and Societal Justice. Although there is general acceptance within the medical profession that physicians may distribute limited treatments based solely on potential medical benefits without regard to nonmedical factors, that does not mean that society cannot impose limits based on societal factors. If a society considers the convicted felon to be a full member, then that person would be entitled (...)
     
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  21.  21
    Ethics and Rationing Access to Dialysis in Resource‐Limited Settings: The Consequences of Refusing a Renal Transplant in the South African State Sector.Harriet Etheredge & Graham Paget - 2015 - Developing World Bioethics 15 (3):233-240.
    Resource constraints in developing countries compel policy makers to ration the provision of healthcare services. This article examines one such set of Guidelines: A patient dialysing in the state sector in South Africa may not refuse renal transplantation when a kidney becomes available. Refusal of transplantation can lead to exclusion from the state-funded dialysis programme. This Guideline is legally acceptable as related to Constitutional stipulations which allow for rationing healthcare resources in South Africa. Evaluating the ethical merit of the Guideline, (...)
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  22. Justice and Liability in Organ Allocation.Jeff Mcmahan - 2007 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 74 (1):101-124.
    This essay argues that considerations of justice that govern the morality of self-defense are also relevant in some cases in which organs are allocated for transplantation in conditions of scarcity. The essay's main substantive claim is that in general alcoholics are morally liable to be assigned a lower priority in the distribution of livers for transplantation because of their own responsibility for their need for a transplant. There are, however, practical obstacles to giving lower priority in the (...) of medical resources generally to those who are responsible for their own illnesses, and it may seem unfair to single out alcoholics but not others for lower priority. (shrink)
     
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  23.  17
    The Ethics of Testing and Research of Manufactured Organs on Brain-Dead/Recently Deceased Subjects.Brendan Parent, Bruce Gelb, Stephen Latham, Ariane Lewis, Laura L. Kimberly & Arthur L. Caplan - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (3):199-204.
    Over 115 000 people are waiting for life-saving organ transplants, of whom a small fraction will receive transplants and many others will die while waiting. Existing efforts to expand the number of available organs, including increasing the number of registered donors and procuring organs in uncontrolled environments, are crucial but unlikely to address the shortage in the near future and will not improve donor/recipient compatibility or organ quality. If successful, organ bioengineering can solve the shortage and improve (...)
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  24.  17
    Presuming Consent, Presuming Refusal: Organ Donation and Communal Structure. [REVIEW]Erich H. Loewy - 2000 - Health Care Analysis 8 (3):297-308.
    Donating, distributing and ultimately transplantingorgans each has distinct ethical problems. In thispaper I suggest that the first ethical question is notwhat should be done but what is a fair way in whicheach of these problems can be addressed. Experts –whether these be transplant surgeons, policy analysts,political scientists or ethicists – can help guidebut cannot by themselves make such decisions. Inmaking these decisions the difference betweenidentified and non-identified lives is crucial. Isuggest that an approach in which reason is temperedby compassion (...)
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  25.  29
    The Supply Side of Organ Allocation.Axel Ockenfels & Joachim Weimann - 2001 - Analyse & Kritik 23 (2):280-285.
    The benefits of a large organ pool accrue not only to the actual organ recipients themselves, but to others as well due to the insurance it provides against having to wait 'too long' for an organ transplant. We argue that this public good character of a large organ pool makes it economically and ethically justifiable to design a market mechanism that boosts the number of donors. Most importantly, such a mechanism has the potential to substantially (...)
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  26.  44
    Recovery of Transplantable Organs After Cardiac or Circulatory Death: Transforming the Paradigm for the Ethics of Organ Donation.Joseph L. Verheijde, Mohamed Y. Rady & Joan McGregor - 2007 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2:8-.
    Organ donation after cardiac or circulatory death (DCD) has been introduced to increase the supply of transplantable organs. In this paper, we argue that the recovery of viable organs useful for transplantation in DCD is not compatible with the dead donor rule and we explain the consequential ethical and legal ramifications. We also outline serious deficiencies in the current consent process for DCD with respect to disclosure of necessary elements for voluntary informed decision making and respect for the donor's (...)
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  27.  18
    Trust and Altruism--Organ Distribution Scandals: Do They Provide Good Reasons to Refuse Posthumous Donation?A. Dufner & J. Harris - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (3):328-341.
    A recent organ distribution scandal in Germany raises questions of general importance on which many thousands of lives may well depend. The scandal in Germany has produced reactions that are likely to occur whenever and wherever distribution irregularities occur and become public knowledge. After it had become known that physicians in three German hospitals were in the habit of manipulating records in order to fast-track their patients’ cases, the country experienced a decrease of available organs by a (...)
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  28.  90
    The Moral Status of Preferences for Directed Donation: Who Should Decide Who Gets Transplantable Organs?Rachel A. Ankeny - 2001 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (4):387-398.
    Bioethics has entered a new era: as many commentators have noted, the familiar mantra of autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice has proven to be an overly simplistic framework for understanding problems that arise in modern medicine, particularly at the intersection of public policy and individual preferences. A tradition of liberal pluralism grounds respect for individual preferences and affirmation of competing conceptions of the good. But we struggle to maintain (or at times explicitly reject) this tradition in the face of individual (...)
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  29.  4
    How Should More Human Transplant Organs Be Acquired?Part Five - 2012 - In Stephen Holland (ed.), Arguing About Bioethics. Routledge. pp. 231.
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  30.  92
    The Morality of a Free Market for Transplant Organs.Mark T. Nelson - 1991 - Public Affairs Quarterly 5 (1):63-79.
    There is a world-wide shortage of kidneys for transplantation. Many people will have to endure lengthy and unpleasant dialysis treatments, or die before an organ becomes available. Given this chronic shortage, some doctors and health economists have proposed offering financial incentives to potential donors to increase the supply of transplantable organs. In this paper, I explore objections to the practice of buying and selling organs from the point of view 1) justice, 2) beneficence and 3) Commodification. Regarding objection to (...)
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  31.  24
    "Because You're Worth It?" The Taking and Selling of Transplantable Organs.G. Haddow - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (6):324-328.
    In the UK, the legal processes underpinning the procurement system for cadaveric organs for transplantation and research after death are under review. The review originated after media reports of hospitals, such as Alder Hey and Bristol, retaining organs after death without the full, informed consent of relatives. The organ procurement systems for research and transplantation are separate and distinct, but given that legal change will be applicable to both, some have argued now is the time to introduce alternative (...) transplant procurement systems such as presumed consent or incentive based schemes . Findings are reported in this paper from qualitative and quantitative research undertaken in Scotland in order to ascertain the public acceptability of different procurement systems. Nineteen in depth interviews carried out with donor families about their experiences of donating the organs of the deceased covered their views of organ retention, presumed consent, and financial incentives. This led onto a representative interview survey of 1009 members of the Scottish public. The originality of the triangulated qualitative and quantitative study offers exploration of alternative organ procurement systems from different “sides of the fence”. The findings suggest that the legal changes taking place are appropriate in clarifying the role of the family but can go further in strengthening the choice of the individual to donate. (shrink)
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  32. "[Supplying Organs for Transplantation Jesse Dukeminier,] R." the Transplantation of Organs Will Be Assimilated Into Ordinary Clinical Practice... And There is No Need to Be Philosophical About It. This Will Come About for the Single and Suficient Reason That. [REVIEW]Need A. Transplant - 1984 - Bioethics Reporter 1 (1):22.
     
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  33.  30
    Body Values: The Case Against Compensating for Transplant Organs.Donald Joralemon & Phil Cox - 2003 - Hastings Center Report 33 (1):27-33.
  34.  28
    Seeking an Ethical and Legal Way of Procuring Transplantable Organs From the Dying Without Further Attempts to Redefine Human Death.David Wainwright Evans - 2007 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2:11.
    Because complex organs taken from unequivocally dead people are not suitable for transplantation, human death has been redefined so that it can be certified at some earlier stage in the dying process and thereby make viable organs available without legal problems. Redefinitions based on concepts of.
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  35.  18
    Commodification, Exploitation, and the Market for Transplant Organs: A Discussion of Dirty Pretty Things.Clark Wolf - unknown
    In the film Dirty Pretty Things, one of the main characters, Okwe, discovers that his employer, "Sneaky", is running a peculiar business. During the day Sneaky seems an ordinary hotelier. But on the side he runs a service to provide counterfeit passports for illegal immigrants who wish to remain in Britain. He arranges for poor immigrants to "donate" one of their kidneys, which he sells to people in need of a transplant. In return, he provides the "donors" with forged (...)
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  36.  14
    Introduction: Symposium on a Regulated Market in Transplantable Organs.B. E. Hippen - 2009 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (6):545-551.
  37.  39
    Commodification, Exploitation, and the Market for Transplant Organs.Clark Wolf - 2009 - In Sandra Shapshay (ed.), Bioethics at the Movies. Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 170.
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  38. Organ Donation and Transplantation.Human Organs & Substituted Judgement Doctrine - 1984 - Bioethics Reporter 1 (1).
     
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  39.  9
    Deceased Organ Transplantation in Bangladesh: The Dynamics of Bioethics, Religion and Culture.Md Sanwar Siraj - 2022 - HEC Forum 34 (2):139-167.
    Organ transplantation from living related donors in Bangladesh first began in October 1982, and became commonplace in 1988. Cornea transplantation from posthumous donors began in 1984 and living related liver and bone marrow donor transplantation began in 2010 and 2014 respectively. The Human Organ Transplantation Act officially came into effect in Bangladesh on 13th April 1999, allowing organ donation from both brain-dead and related living donors for transplantation. Before the legislation, religious leaders issued fatwa, or religious rulings, (...)
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  40.  67
    Organ Transplantation and Personal Identity: How Does Loss and Change of Organs Affect the Self?F. Svenaeus - 2012 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (2):139-158.
    In this paper, changes in identity and selfhood experienced through organ transplantation are analyzed from a phenomenological point of view. The chief examples are heart and face transplants. Similarities and differences between the examples are fleshed out by way of identifying three layers of selfhood in which the procedures have effects: embodied selfhood, self-reflection, and social-narrative identity. Organ transplantation is tied to processes of alienation in the three layers of selfhood, first and foremost a bodily alienation experienced through (...)
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  41.  22
    Are Transplant Recipients Human Subjects When Research Is Conducted on Organ Donors?Kate Gallin Heffernan & Alexandra K. Glazier - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (5):10-14.
    Interventional research on deceased organ donors and donor organs prior to transplant holds the promise of reducing the number of patients who die waiting for an organ by expanding the pool of transplantable organs and improving transplant outcomes. However, one of the key challenges researchers face is an assumption that someone who receives an organ that was part of an interventional research protocol is always a human subject of that same study. The consequences of this (...)
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  42.  9
    Anencephalic Infants as Sources of Transplantable Organs.Martin Benjamin - 1988 - Hastings Center Report 18 (5):28-30.
  43. Transplant Tourism: The Ethics and Regulation of International Markets for Organs.I. Glenn Cohen - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1):269-285.
    “Medical Tourism” is the travel of residents of one country to another country for treatment. In this article I focus on travel abroad to purchase organs for transplant, what I will call “Transplant Tourism.” With the exception of Iran, organ sale is illegal across the globe, but many destination countries have thriving black markets, either due to their willful failure to police the practice or more good faith lack of resources to detect it. I focus on the (...)
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  44.  11
    Transplant Tourism: The Ethics and Regulation of International Markets for Organs.I. Glenn Cohen - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1):269-285.
    “Medical Tourism” is the travel of residents of one country to another country for treatment. In this article I focus on travel abroad to purchase organs for transplant, what I will call “Transplant Tourism.” With the exception of Iran, organ sale is illegal across the globe, but many destination countries have thriving black markets, either due to their willful failure to police the practice or more good faith lack of resources to detect it. I focus on the (...)
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  45.  23
    Organ Transplantation and Meaning of Life: The Quest for Self Fulfilment. [REVIEW]Jacques Quintin - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):565-574.
    Today, the frequency and the rate of success resulting from advances in medicine have made organ transplantations an everyday occurrence. Still, organ transplantations and donations modify the subjective experience of human beings as regards the image they have of themselves, of body, of life and of death. If the concern of the quality of life and the survival of the patients is a completely human phenomenon, the fact remains that the possibility of organ transplantation and its justification (...)
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  46.  3
    Organ Transplants and the Medicalisation of Death: Dilemmas for Tibetan Buddhists.Malcolm Voyce - 2020 - Contemporary Buddhism 21 (1-2):190-200.
    ABSTRACT This article deals with the Buddhist approach to death and the dilemmas facing Buddhists as regards the donation of their bodies after death. In particular, the article outlines the importance of the death process in providing an opportunity for transformation and Enlightenment. Firstly, the article deals with the issue of how bodies are procured for transplantation. This section notes the importance of the ‘brain death’ approach and the consequential issues surrounding the procurement of bodies that may arguably not be (...)
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  47. Arguments Against Promoting Organ Transplants From Brain-Dead Donors, and Views of Contemporary Japanese on Life and Death.Atsushi Asai, Yasuhiro Kadooka & Kuniko Aizawa - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (4):215-223.
    As of 2009, the number of donors in Japan is the lowest among developed countries. On July 13, 2009, Japan's Organ Transplant Law was revised for the first time in 12 years. The revised and old laws differ greatly on four primary points: the definition of death, age requirements for donors, requirements for brain- death determination and organ extraction, and the appropriateness of priority transplants for relatives.In the four months of deliberations in the National Diet before the (...)
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  48.  77
    From Agape to Organs: Religious Difference Between Japan and America in Judging the Ethics of the Transplant.William R. LaFleur - 2002 - Zygon 37 (3):623-642.
    This essay argues that Japan's resistance to the practice of transplanting organs from persons deemed “brain dead” may not be the result, as some claim, of that society's religions being not yet sufficiently expressive of love and altruism. The violence to the body necessary for the excision of transplantable organs seems to have been made acceptable to American Christians at a unique historical “window of opportunity” for acceptance of that new form of medical technology. Traditional reserve about corpse mutilation had (...)
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  49.  91
    Organ Transplantation: Contemporary Sunni Muslim Legal and Ethical Perspectives.Abul Fadl Mohsin Ebrahim - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (3):291–302.
    The problems that organ transplantation poses to the Muslim mind may be summarized as follows: firstly, a muslim believes that whatever he owns or possesses has been given to him as an amānah from Alla¯h. Would it not be a breach of trust to give consent for the removal of parts of one's body, while still alive, for transplantation to benefit one's child, sibling or parent? Secondly, the Sharā'ah emphasizes the sacredness of the human body. Would it not then (...)
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  50.  52
    Global Initiatives to Tackle Organ Trafficking and Transplant Tourism.Alireza Bagheri & Francis L. Delmonico - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):887-895.
    The increasing gap between organ supply and demand has opened the door for illegal organ sale, trafficking of human organs, tissues and cells, as well as transplant tourism. Currently, underprivileged and vulnerable populations in resource-poor countries are a major source of organs for rich patient-tourists who can afford to purchase organs at home or abroad. This paper presents a summary of international initiatives, such as World Health Organization’s Principle Guidelines, The Declaration of Istanbul, Asian Task Force Recommendations, (...)
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