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  1. Ownership and Commodifiability of Synthetic and Natural Organs.Philip J. Nickel - manuscript
    The arrival of synthetic organs may mean we need to reconsider principles of ownership of such items. One possible ownership criterion is the boundary between the organ’s being outside or inside the body. What is outside of my body, even if it is a natural organ made of my cells, may belong to a company or research institution. Yet when it is placed in me, it belongs to me. In the future, we should also keep an eye on how the (...)
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  2. The ongoing charity of organ donation. Contemporary English sunni fatwas on organ donation and blood transfusion.Stefden Branden & Bert Broeckaert - forthcoming - Bioethics.
    Background: Empirical studies in Muslim communities on organ donation and blood transfusion show that Muslim counsellors play an important role in the decision process. Despite the emerging importance of online English Sunni fatwas, these fatwas on organ donation and blood transfusion have hardly been studied, thus creating a gap in our knowledge of contemporary Islamic views on the subject. Method: We analysed 70 English Sunni e-fatwas and subjected them to an in-depth text analysis in order to reveal the key concepts (...)
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  3. Welfare, Abortion, and Organ Donation: A Reply to the Restrictivist.Emily Carroll & Parker Crutchfield - forthcoming - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics:1-6.
    William Simkulet has challenged our recent argument that parents have an obligation to donate organs and tissues to the same extent that abortion is restricted. The central feature of our argument is that parents have a duty to protect their offspring. If this duty is sufficient to require gestation of a fetus, then it is also sufficient to require that the parent allow offspring the continued use of their organs and tissues. Simkulet challenges this argument on several fronts. In this (...)
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  4. James Stacey Taylor, Markets with Limits: How the Commodification of Academia Derails Debate. New York: Routledge. 234pp. ISBN: 9781003251996. US $48.95 (Pbk). [REVIEW]Stephen Kershnar - forthcoming - Journal of Value Inquiry:1-6.
    James Stacey Taylor’s book – Markets with Limits: How the Commodification of Academia Derails Debate (New York: Routledge, 2022) – is excellent. He explores the errors that have derailed the discussion of the limits of markets, attempts to rerail the discussion through a clarifying taxonomy, and explains why the derailment occurred. He also argues that academic research should be governed by academic rather than market norms. The first part of his project succeeds. It is less clear whether the second and (...)
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  5. Vulnerability Ethics, Abortion, and Organ Donation.Elizabeth Latham - forthcoming - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics:1-7.
    In a recent issue of the Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics, Emily Carroll and Parker Crutchfield published a paper entitled, “The Duty to Protect, Abortion, and Organ Donation.” They argued that a prohibition on abortion is morally equivalent to a positive mandate for parents to donate organs to their children and that opponents of abortion must be prepared to accept these mandates to remain consistent.
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  6. Situation of organ donation and transplantation in Bolivia.Cecilia López, Sindel Bobarin, Cinthya Colque & Shirley Jesús - forthcoming - Revista de Filosofía y Cotidianidad.
    After having accomplished an observation of the different problematic that affect the daily life of our city, as reflect of what happens in the rest of the national territory, we have been attracted to implement a juridical analysis to the situation of the donation and organ transplantation in the legal ambit of our country, with the objective to identify the level of efficacy and the normative scope with respect to the situation of people who need a transplant. This restlessness born (...)
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  7. Double effect donation or bodily respect? A 'third way' response to Camosy and Vukov.Anthony McCarthy & Helen Watt - forthcoming - The Linacre Quarterly.
    Is it possible to donate unpaired vital organs, foreseeing but not intending one's own death? We argue that this is indeed psychologically possible, and thus far agree with Charles Camosy and Joseph Vukov in their recent paper on 'double effect donation.' Where we disagree with these authors is that we see double effect donation not as a morally praiseworthy act akin to martyrdom but as a morally impermissible act that necessarily disrespects human bodily integrity. Respect for bodily integrity goes beyond (...)
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  8. Double Effect Donation or Bodily Respect? A "Third Way" Response to Camosy and Vukov.Anthony McCarthy & Helen Watt - forthcoming - Linacre Quarterly:1-17.
    Is it possible to donate unpaired vital organs, foreseeing but not intending one’s own death? We argue that this is indeed psychologically possible, and thus far agree with Charles Camosy and Joseph Vukov in their recent paper on “double effect donation.” Where we disagree with these authors is that we see double-effect donation not as a morally praiseworthy act akin to mar- tyrdom but as a morally impermissible act that necessarily disrespects human bodily integrity. Respect for bodily integrity goes beyond (...)
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  9. Breaking down organ donation borders: Revisiting “opt out” residency requirements in the UK.Jordan A. Parsons - forthcoming - Clinical Ethics.
    All four UK nations have, in recent years, introduced “opt out” organ donation systems. Whilst these systems are largely similar, they operate independently. A key feature of each policy is a residency requirement, stipulating that opt out may only apply where the deceased had been ordinarily resident in that nation for at least 12 months. A resident of Scotland who dies in England, for example, would not fall under opt out. Public awareness is the underlying reasoning for such stipulations. A (...)
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  10. Xenotransplantation: A historical–ethical account of viewpoints.Daniel Rodger, Daniel J. Hurst & David K. C. Cooper - forthcoming - Xenotransplantation.
    Formal clinical trials of pig-to-human organ transplant—known as xenotransplantation—may begin this decade, with the first trials likely to consist of either adult renal transplants or pediatric cardiac transplant patients. Xenotransplantation as a systematic scientific study only reaches back to the latter half of the 20th century, with episodic xenotransplantation events occurring prior to that. As the science of xenotransplantation has progressed in the 20th and 21st centuries, the public's knowledge of the potential therapy has also increased. With this, there have (...)
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  11. Family‐based consent and motivation for familial organ donation in Bangladesh: An empirical exploration.Md Sanwar Siraj - forthcoming - Developing World Bioethics.
    The government of Bangladesh approved the human organ transplantation law in 1999 and updated it in 2018. This legislation approved both living‐related donor and posthumous organ transplantation. The law only allows family members to legally donate organs to their relatives. The main focus of this study was to explore how Bangladeshis make donation decisions on familial organs for transplantation. My ethnographic fieldwork with forty participants (physicians and nurses, a healthcare administrator, organ donors, recipients, and their relatives) disclosed that the organ (...)
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  12. Ethical Justifications for Organ Donation after Cardiac Death.Raquel Spencer - forthcoming - Think.
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  13. Dual Advocates in Deceased Organ Donation: The Potential for Moral Distress in Organ Procurement Organization Staff.Anna D. Goff & Hannah C. Boylan - 2024 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 35 (1):70-75.
    Organ procurement organization (OPO) staff play an essential role in the facilitation of organ donation as they guide family members and loved ones of dying patients through the donation process. Throughout the donation process, OPO staff must assume the role of a dual advocate, considering both the interests of the donor (which often include the wishes of the donor’s family) and the interests of potential recipient(s). The benefits of this role are well established; however, minimal literature exists on the ways (...)
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  14. Catholic Unity on Brain Death and Organ Donation.David Tomasi - 2024 - A Call to Action 1:1-16.
    Authors: Joseph M. Eble, John A. Di Camillo, Peter J. Colosi. --- NEWS RELEASE For Immediate Release February 27, 2024 Contact: Joseph M. Eble, MD Corresponding author 919-667-5206 -/- The statement, Catholics United on Brain Death and Organ Donation: A Call to Action (HTML), was published on February 27, 2024. It was prepared by Joseph Eble, a physician and President of the Tulsa Guild of the Catholic Medical Association; John Di Camillo, an ethicist of The National Catholic Bioethics Center; and (...)
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  15. Efficiency and the futures market in organs.Andreas Albertsen - 2023 - Monash Bioethics Review 41 (1):66-81.
    There has been considerable debate over regulated organ markets. Especially current markets, where people sell one of their kidneys while still alive, have received increased attention. Futures markets remain an interesting and under-discussed alternative specification of a market-based solution to the organ shortage. Futures markets pertain to the sale of the right to procure people’s organs after they die. There is a wide range of possible specifications of the futures market. There are, however, some major unaddressed efficiency concerns. This article (...)
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  16. How did organ donation in Israel become a club membership model? From civic to communal solidarity in organ sharing.Hagai Boas - 2023 - Monash Bioethics Review 41 (1):49-65.
    Figuring out what pushes individuals to become organ donors has become the holy grail of social scientists interested in transplantations. In this paper I concentrate on solidarity as a determinant of organ donation and examine it through the history of organ donation in Israel. By following the history of transplantation policies since 1968 and examining them in relation to different types of solidarities, this paper leads to a nuanced understanding of the ties between solidarity and health policy. Attempts to foster (...)
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  17. Organ Donation: The Hong Kong Context.Ho Mun Chan & T.-Fai Yeung - 2023 - In Ruiping Fan (ed.), Incentives and Disincentives in Organ Donation: A Multicultural Study among Beijing, Chicago, Tehran and Hong Kong. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 173-193.
    This chapter gives an outline of the development of the human organ transplant system in Hong Kong, whose key features are a soft opt-in system and strict prohibitions on commercial dealings in human organs for transplant. It is argued that under such a system, there is a lack of incentives for either cadaveric or living organ donations and for family members to endorse deceased donation. This argument is followed by an investigation of the shortage of organ donations in Hong Kong, (...)
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  18. Default Positions in Clinical Ethics.Parker Crutchfield, Tyler Gibb & Michael Redinger - 2023 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 34 (3):258-269.
    Default positions, predetermined starting points that aid in complex decision-making, are common in clinical medicine. In this article, we identify and critically examine common default positions in clinical ethics practice. Whether default positions ought to be held is an important normative question, but here we are primarily interested in the descriptive, rather than normative, properties of default positions. We argue that default positions in clinical ethics function to protect and promote important values in medicine—respect for persons, utility, and justice. Further, (...)
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  19. Mapping trust relationships in organ donation and transplantation: a conceptual model.Janet Delgado, Sabine Wöhlke, Jorge Suárez, David Rodríguez-Arias, Gurch Randhawa, Nadia Primc, Krzysztof Pabisiak, Alberto Molina-Pérez, Leah McLaughlin & María Victoria Martínez-López - 2023 - BMC Medical Ethics 24 (1):1-14.
    The organ donation and transplantation (ODT) system heavily relies on the willingness of individuals to donate their organs. While it is widely believed that public trust plays a crucial role in shaping donation rates, the empirical support for this assumption remains limited. In order to bridge this knowledge gap, this article takes a foundational approach by elucidating the concept of trust within the context of ODT. By examining the stakeholders involved, identifying influential factors, and mapping the intricate trust relationships among (...)
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  20. Organ Donation Incentives: Implications for Hong Kong and Beyond.Chunyan Ding & Ho Mun Chan - 2023 - In Ruiping Fan (ed.), Incentives and Disincentives in Organ Donation: A Multicultural Study among Beijing, Chicago, Tehran and Hong Kong. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 275-291.
    This chapter discusses some legal implications of Hong Kong’s three types of organ donation incentive and presents further thoughts about their ethical and policy implications. It aims to transform the useful findings presented in previous chapters into legal solutions and policy innovations in practice. We argue that the Hong Kong law is able to incorporate mixed incentive measures and further suggest detailed legal rules regarding organ incentives for the government to consider. In terms of ethical and policy implications in a (...)
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  21. What Follows from State-Mandated Pregnancy?Jake Earl & Caitlin J. Cain - 2023 - Annals of Internal Medicine 176 (2):270-271.
    This Ideas and Opinions article revisits an argument from Judith Jarvis Thomson in her essay “A Defense of Abortion” that abortion can be an ethical choice even if we assume that fetuses have full moral personhood and moral rights. The authors examine the implications of laws that require a pregnant person to care for another with their body and what other impositions states may also require of citizens to care for others.
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  22. Incentives and Disincentives in Organ Donation: A Multicultural Study among Beijing, Chicago, Tehran and Hong Kong.Ruiping Fan (ed.) - 2023 - Springer Nature Switzerland.
    This book provides the first systematic study on three types of incentives for organ donation. It covers extensive research conducted in four culturally different societies: Hong Kong, mainland China, Iran and the United States, and shows on the basis of the research that a new model of incentives can be constructed to enhance organ donation in contemporary societies. The book focuses on three types of incentives: honorary incentives, commonly adopted in the United States and other Western countries by offering things (...)
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  23. Organ Donation, Comprehensively Good Incentives, and the Family: A Comment on Hong Kong’s Interview Findings and Survey Results.Ruiping Fan - 2023 - In Incentives and Disincentives in Organ Donation: A Multicultural Study among Beijing, Chicago, Tehran and Hong Kong. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 237-259.
    This chapter provides conceptual and ethical comments on Hong Kong’s interview findings and survey results regarding the three types of incentive for organ donation. It focuses on three particular conceptual and ethical issues. First, it shows that there is not always a clear-cut distinction between an honorary and a compensationalist incentive measure for organ donation. Instead, a measure such as offering a public columbarium niche to a deceased donor in Hong Kong carries both honorary and compensationalist elements and can, as (...)
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  24. DCD Donors Are Dying, but Not Dead.L. Syd M. Johnson - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (2):28-30.
    As usually understood, the Dead Donor Rule (DDR) for organ donation requires either that (1) the donor is already dead (which legally occurs when death is determined by neurological criteria), and/or that (2) organ procurement does not cause the donor’s death.
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  25. The Concepts and Development of Organ Donation Policy in the United States.Wan-Zi Lu & J. Michael Millis - 2023 - In Ruiping Fan (ed.), Incentives and Disincentives in Organ Donation: A Multicultural Study among Beijing, Chicago, Tehran and Hong Kong. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 71-81.
    This chapter is a contextual investigation of organ donation in the United States. It first presents empirical data related to the growth of donation rates to contextualize relevant developments before introducing the key legal apparatus, the National Organ Transplant Act (NOTA). Part Two details policy and legislation regarding transplantation in the US, covering the justification for and goals of organ donation, the history of relevant regulations, and the passage of NOTA. Part Three focuses on the systems and structures of organ (...)
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  26. A Comment on the Barriers to and Incentives for Organ Donation in Iran.Mitra Mahdavi-Mazdeh & Anna Maliwat - 2023 - In Ruiping Fan (ed.), Incentives and Disincentives in Organ Donation: A Multicultural Study among Beijing, Chicago, Tehran and Hong Kong. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 153-170.
    This chapter discusses the barriers to donation, the role of different incentives, and the successful experience of Iran in promoting organ donation. The lack of knowledge about brain death, controversies regarding compensationalist incentives for live donation as opposed to brain-dead donations (BDDs), and giving consent to donation on behalf of someone else are the three main barriers to improving organ donation in Iran. Incentives with a compensationalist component were found to be sensitive and controversial, and familist incentives were believed to (...)
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  27. Interview Findings in Relation to Organ Donation in Iran.Mitra Mahdavi-Mazdeh & Ellen Sepanian - 2023 - In Ruiping Fan (ed.), Incentives and Disincentives in Organ Donation: A Multicultural Study among Beijing, Chicago, Tehran and Hong Kong. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 133-151.
    The interviews carried out in Iran investigate how people view organ donation and relevant incentives. The data collected from the 18 interviewees with organ recipients, experts in the organ donation field, donors, and donor family members shows that all interviewees believed deceased organ donation is an excellent source for transplantation which can help grieving families. The interviewees also concur that donors deserve some compensation, but they are more in favor of honorary than compensationalist incentives. Among the proposed compensationalist incentive measures, (...)
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  28. Is Transparency about the Line between Life and Death Good for Organ Donation?Jerry Menikoff - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (2):24-26.
    People of a certain age will immediately recognize the image of a distraught woman, hand to her forehead, bemoaning how she just now realized that she forgot to have children. Nielsen Busch and Mja...
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  29. Proposal to support making decisions about the organ donation process.Greg Moorlock & Heather Draper - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (6):434-438.
    In this paper, we propose a novel approach to permit members of the public opportunity to record more nuanced wishes in relation to organ donation. Recent developments in organ donation and procurement have made the associated processes potentially more multistaged and complex than ever. At the same time, opt-out legislation has led to a more simplistic recording of wishes than ever. We argue that in order to be confident that a patient would really wish to go ahead with the various (...)
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  30. Organ donation after euthanasia starting with anesthesia at home is legal in The Netherlands, Belgium, Canada and Spain.Johannes Mulder & Hans Sonneveld - 2023 - BMC Medical Ethics 24 (1):1-2.
    We would like to respond to the article “Organ donation after euthanasia starting at home in a patient with multiple system atrophy Tajaâte et al., [2021] 22:120” on organ donation after euthanasia from home [ODEH]. Although we welcome the performance of ODEH, we would like to make some critical comments regarding the article, both in relation to factual inaccuracies and in terms of the vision expressed on this subject. In this letter we stress the protection of autonomy of vulnerable euthanasia (...)
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  31. Policy change without ethical analysis? Commentary on the publication of Smajdor.Elena Popa, Jakub Zawiła-Niedźwiecki & Michał Zabdyr-Jamróz - 2023 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 44 (4):379-385.
    This commentary addresses the proposal and argumentative line presented in the paper ‘Whole Body Gestational Donation’ (WBGD) by Anna Smajdor (2023), published as an intended ‘outrageous argument’ in a dedicated special issue of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics. We believe that the paper is fatally flawed due to its lack of engagement with relevant approaches in ethics and essential sources in health sciences as well as its insufficient, superficial, and rash argumentation. Its critical weaknesses include, among others, that it does not (...)
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  32. Opt-out paradigms for deceased organ donation are ethically incoherent.G. M. Qurashi - 2023 - Journal of Medical Ethics 49 (12):854-859.
    The Organ Donation Act 2019 has introduced an opt-out organ donor register in England, meaning that consent to the donation of organs upon death is presumed unless an objection during life was actively expressed. By assessing the rights of the dead over their organs, the sick to those same organs, and the role of consent in their requisition, this paper interrogates whether such paradigms for deceased organ donation are ethically justifiable. Where legal considerations are applicable, I focus on the recent (...)
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  33. Organ Donation Incentives: A Multicultural Comparison.Lisa M. Rasmussen - 2023 - In Ruiping Fan (ed.), Incentives and Disincentives in Organ Donation: A Multicultural Study among Beijing, Chicago, Tehran and Hong Kong. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 263-273.
    This essay is a comparative analysis of results reported in this volume from studies in mainland China, the United States, Iran, and Hong Kong regarding organ donation incentives. They reveal widespread (but not unanimous) support for honorary incentives (such as notes or ceremonies of gratitude) and significant support for familist incentives (offering a donor’s family members priority should they need an organ transplant in the future). Opinions on financial incentives were much more mixed, with significant worries expressed regarding potential exploitation (...)
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  34. Reply to reaction on ‘Organ donation after euthanasia starting at home in a patient with multiple system atrophy – case report’.Najat Tajaâte, Nathalie van Dijk, Elien Pragt, David Shaw, A. Kempener-Deguelle, Wim de Jongh, Jan Bollen & Walther van Mook - 2023 - BMC Medical Ethics 24 (1):1-2.
    We would like to respond to the comment we received from our colleagues on our case report about organ donation after euthanasia starting at home. We reply to their statements on medical and legal aspects, and provide more information on our view of informed consent.
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  35. Mixed Incentives, Different Voices: A Qualitative Study of Organ Donation Incentive Policies in Two Big Chinese Cities.Jian Tang & Guangkuan Xie - 2023 - In Ruiping Fan (ed.), Incentives and Disincentives in Organ Donation: A Multicultural Study among Beijing, Chicago, Tehran and Hong Kong. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 39-54.
    China is facing a shortage of human organs for transplantations and is also in the process of reforming its system of incentives for human organ donation. We conducted a two-year research project in two big Chinese cities (Beijing and Tianjin) with three primary objectives: (1) to review the institutional progress of policy reform for organ donation in mainland China; (2) to understand how China’s current three prevailing organ donation incentive methods (namely honorary, compensationalist, and familist) have been run in practice; (...)
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  36. Organ Donation Incentives in Mainland China: Ethical Commentaries and Reform Recommendations.Jian Tang, Guangkuan Xie & Yali Cong - 2023 - In Ruiping Fan (ed.), Incentives and Disincentives in Organ Donation: A Multicultural Study among Beijing, Chicago, Tehran and Hong Kong. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 55-68.
    This chapter makes further ethical commentaries in response to the findings as described in Chaps. 2 and 3. We contend that it is not the case that only one type of incentive can be justified to motivate organ donation in mainland China. In particular, we argue that while each of the three types of incentive (honorary, compensationalist, and familist) can work, some particular incentive measures can be ethically justified and be the most motivating in the context of mainland China. Based (...)
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  37. Organ Donation After Medical Assistance in Dying.Ryan Tonkens - 2023 - In Jaro Kotalik & David W. Shannon (eds.), Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID) in Canada: Key Multidisciplinary Perspectives. Springer Verlag. pp. 2147483647-2147483647.
    Here I consider some of the ethical and philosophical issues at the intersection of medical assistance in dying (MAiD) and deceased organ donation (DOD). Three possible objections about inherent aspects of the practice of DOD after MAiD are considered, and rejected. The bulk of the chapter examines recent calls to keep decisions about DOD and MAiD separate, and to clarifying the nature of the ethical concerns underlying effort to protect patients from undue pressure and coercion. Several insights are revealed as (...)
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  38. The Background to Organ Donation in Mainland China.Guangkuan Xie & Yali Cong - 2023 - In Ruiping Fan (ed.), Incentives and Disincentives in Organ Donation: A Multicultural Study among Beijing, Chicago, Tehran and Hong Kong. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 25-37.
    This chapter introduces the background to organ donation and transplantation in mainland China. First, it briefly describes China’s current healthcare system and the development of organ transplantation. Then it introduces some important legislation and landmark policies regarding organ donation in recent years. Finally, it presents the organ donation operation system and its relevant features in mainland China.
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  39. Incentives for Organ Donation in Hong Kong: In-Depth Interviews.T.-Fai Yeung - 2023 - In Ruiping Fan (ed.), Incentives and Disincentives in Organ Donation: A Multicultural Study among Beijing, Chicago, Tehran and Hong Kong. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 195-214.
    Across the globe, there are many different ways of promoting cadaveric organ donation, but they can essentially be categorized as honorary incentives, familist incentives, and compensationalist incentives, or a combination of these. It is believed that the culture, norms, and ethical values of different places matter when considering what kinds of incentive to implement. It should also be noted that, in terms of effectiveness, implementing the same approach in two different places can lead to quite diverse outcomes. Hong Kong is (...)
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  40. Incentives for Organ Donation in Hong Kong: A Survey.Lawrence Yeuk-yu Yung & Yang Zheng - 2023 - In Ruiping Fan (ed.), Incentives and Disincentives in Organ Donation: A Multicultural Study among Beijing, Chicago, Tehran and Hong Kong. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 215-236.
    Aiming to understand Hong Kong people’s attitudes toward the three types of incentives (honorary, familist, compensationalist) for organ donation, we conducted a questionnaire with the method of cluster sampling. We divided the Hong Kong population into clusters according to its eighteen districts (local councils) and then selected four districts to carry out the survey. To make sure that the sampling represents the larger population of Hong Kong, we reached out to respondents from private estates and public housing in each of (...)
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  41. Should Compensation for Organ Donation Be Allowed?Arthur Caplan & Rosamond Rhodes - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (3):286-296.
    The need for organs to transplant is clear. Due to the lack of transplants, people suffer, they die, and the cost of taking care of them until they die is huge. There is general agreement that it would be good to increase the supply of organs in order to meet the demand for organ transplantation.
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  42. The Duty to Protect, Abortion, and Organ Donation.Emily Carroll & Parker Crutchfield - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (3):333-343.
    Some people oppose abortion on the grounds that fetuses have full moral status and thus a right to not be killed. We argue that special obligations that hold between mother and fetus also hold between parents and their children. We argue that if these special obligations necessitate the sacrifice of bodily autonomy in the case of abortion, then they also necessitate the sacrifice of bodily autonomy in the case of organ donation. If we accept the argument that it is obligatory (...)
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  43. Public Perception of Organ Donation and Transplantation Policies in Southern Spain.Gonzalo Díaz-Cobacho, Maite Cruz-Piqueras, Janet Delgado, Joaquín Hortal-Carmona, María Victoria Martínez-López, Alberto Molina-Pérez, Álvaro Padilla-Pozo, Julia Ranchal-Romero & David Rodríguez-Arias - 2022 - Transplantation Proceedings 54 (3):567-574.
    Background: This research explores how public awareness and attitudes toward donation and transplantation policies may contribute to Spain's success in cadaveric organ donation. Materials and Methods: A representative sample of 813 people residing in Andalusia (Southern Spain) were surveyed by telephone or via Internet between October and December 2018. Results: Most participants trust Spain's donation and transplantation system (93%) and wish to donate their organs after death (76%). Among donors, a majority have expressed their consent (59%), and few nondonors have (...)
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  44. Altruistic Organ Donation: On Giving a Kidney to a Stranger.Leonard Fleck & Arthur Ward - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (3):395-399.
    In the following interview, philosophers Leonard Fleck and Arthur Ward discuss the latter’s recent experience of being a nondirected kidney donor. The interview took place in the Center for Bioethics and Social Justice at Michigan State University.
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  45. Justifying the risks of COVID-19 challenge trials: The analogy with organ donation.Athmeya Jayaram, Jacob Sparks & Daniel Callies - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (1):100-106.
    In the beginning of the COVID pandemic, researchers and bioethicists called for human challenge trials to hasten the development of a vaccine for COVID. However, the fact that we lacked a specific, highly effective treatment for COVID led many to argue that a COVID challenge trial would be unethical and we ought to pursue traditional phase III testing instead. These ethical objections to challenge trials may have slowed the progress of a COVID vaccine, so it is important to evaluate their (...)
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  46. Existing Ethical Tensions in Xenotransplantation.L. Syd M. Johnson - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (3):355-367.
    The genetic modification of pigs as a source of transplantable organs is one of several possible solutions to the chronic organ shortage. This paper describes existing ethical tensions in xenotransplantation (XTx) that argue against pursuing it. Recommendations for lifelong infectious disease surveillance and notification of close contacts of recipients are in tension with the rights of human research subjects. Parental/guardian consent for pediatric xenograft recipients is in tension with a child’s right to an open future. Individual consent to transplant is (...)
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  47. Medical Ersatz Liturgies of Death: Anatomical Dissection and Organ Donation as Biopolitical Practices.Kimbell Kornu - 2022 - Heythrop Journal 63 (3):386-400.
  48. Opt-in Vs. Opt-out of Organ Donation in Scotland: Bioethical analysis.Allister Lee & Joseph Tham - 2022 - The New Bioethics 28 (4):341-349.
    This paper looks at the ethics of opt-in vs. opt-out of organ donation as Scotland has transitioned its systems to promote greater organ availability. We first analyse studies that compare the donation rates in other regions due to such a system switch and find that organ increase is inconclusive and modest at best. This is due to a lack of explicit opt-out choices resulting in greater resistance and family override unless there are infrastructures and greater awareness to support such change. (...)
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  49. Righting Health Policy: Bioethics, Political Philosophy, and the Normative Justification of Health Law and Policy.D. Robert MacDougall - 2022 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
    In Righting Health Policy, MacDougall argues that bioethics has not developed the tools best suited for justifying health law and policy. Using Kant’s practical philosophy as an example, he explores the promise of political philosophy for making normatively justified recommendations about health law and policy.
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  50. Beyond the Altruistic Donor: Embedding Solidarity in Organ Procurement Policies.María Victoria Martínez-López, Gonzalo Díaz-Cobacho, Belén Liedo, Jon Rueda & Alberto Molina-Pérez - 2022 - Philosophies 7 (5):107.
    Altruism and solidarity are concepts that are closely related to organ donation for transplantation. On the one hand, they are typically used for encouraging people to donate. On the other hand, they also underpin the regulations in force in each country to different extents. They are often used indistinctly and equivocally, despite the different ethical implications of each concept. This paper aims to clarify to what extent we can speak of altruism and solidarity in the predominant models of organ donation. (...)
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