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  1. Ownership and Commodifiability of Synthetic and Natural Organs.Philip J. Nickel - manuscript
    The arrival of synthetic organs may mean we need to reconsider principles of ownership of such items. One possible ownership criterion is the boundary between the organ’s being outside or inside the body. What is outside of my body, even if it is a natural organ made of my cells, may belong to a company or research institution. Yet when it is placed in me, it belongs to me. In the future, we should also keep an eye on how the (...)
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  2. The ongoing charity of organ donation. Contemporary English sunni fatwas on organ donation and blood transfusion.Stefden Branden & Bert Broeckaert - forthcoming - Bioethics.
    Background: Empirical studies in Muslim communities on organ donation and blood transfusion show that Muslim counsellors play an important role in the decision process. Despite the emerging importance of online English Sunni fatwas, these fatwas on organ donation and blood transfusion have hardly been studied, thus creating a gap in our knowledge of contemporary Islamic views on the subject. Method: We analysed 70 English Sunni e-fatwas and subjected them to an in-depth text analysis in order to reveal the key concepts (...)
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  3. Proposal to support making decisions about the organ donation process.Greg Moorlock & Heather Draper - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    In this paper, we propose a novel approach to permit members of the public opportunity to record more nuanced wishes in relation to organ donation. Recent developments in organ donation and procurement have made the associated processes potentially more multistaged and complex than ever. At the same time, opt-out legislation has led to a more simplistic recording of wishes than ever. We argue that in order to be confident that a patient would really wish to go ahead with the various (...)
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  4. Opt-out paradigms for deceased organ donation are ethically incoherent.G. M. Qurashi - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    The Organ Donation Act 2019 has introduced an opt-out organ donor register in England, meaning that consent to the donation of organs upon death is presumed unless an objection during life was actively expressed. By assessing the rights of the dead over their organs, the sick to those same organs, and the role of consent in their requisition, this paper interrogates whether such paradigms for deceased organ donation are ethically justifiable. Where legal considerations are applicable, I focus on the recent (...)
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  5. Ethical Justifications for Organ Donation after Cardiac Death.Raquel Spencer - forthcoming - Think.
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  6. Is Transparency about the Line between Life and Death Good for Organ Donation?Jerry Menikoff - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (2):24-26.
    People of a certain age will immediately recognize the image of a distraught woman, hand to her forehead, bemoaning how she just now realized that she forgot to have children. Nielsen Busch and Mja...
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  7. Should Compensation for Organ Donation Be Allowed?Arthur Caplan & Rosamond Rhodes - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (3):286-296.
    The need for organs to transplant is clear. Due to the lack of transplants, people suffer, they die, and the cost of taking care of them until they die is huge. There is general agreement that it would be good to increase the supply of organs in order to meet the demand for organ transplantation.
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  8. The Duty to Protect, Abortion, and Organ Donation.Emily Carroll & Parker Crutchfield - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (3):333-343.
    Some people oppose abortion on the grounds that fetuses have full moral status and thus a right to not be killed. We argue that special obligations that hold between mother and fetus also hold between parents and their children. We argue that if these special obligations necessitate the sacrifice of bodily autonomy in the case of abortion, then they also necessitate the sacrifice of bodily autonomy in the case of organ donation. If we accept the argument that it is obligatory (...)
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  9. Ethical issues of organ donation after circulatory death: Considerations for a successful implementation in Chile.Pablo Pérez Castro & Sofía P. Salas - 2022 - Developing World Bioethics 22 (4):259-266.
    Organ transplantation is a lifesaving procedure for end-organ damage and remains up to today as the most cost-effective alternative to treat these conditions. However, the main limitation to performing organ transplants is the availability of donor organs suitable for transplantation. To increase the donor pool, expanding organ donation from the conventional neurologic determination of death (NDD) to include circulatory determination of death (DCD) has been a well-established method of increasing donors in other countries. In this article, we discuss the clinical (...)
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  10. Ethical issues of organ donation after circulatory death: Considerations for a successful implementation in Chile.Pablo Pérez Castro & Sofía P. Salas - 2022 - Developing World Bioethics 22 (4):259-266.
    Organ transplantation is a lifesaving procedure for end-organ damage and remains up to today as the most cost-effective alternative to treat these conditions. However, the main limitation to performing organ transplants is the availability of donor organs suitable for transplantation. To increase the donor pool, expanding organ donation from the conventional neurologic determination of death (NDD) to include circulatory determination of death (DCD) has been a well-established method of increasing donors in other countries. In this article, we discuss the clinical (...)
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  11. Ethical issues of organ donation after circulatory death: Considerations for a successful implementation in Chile.Pablo Pérez Castro & Sofía P. Salas - 2022 - Developing World Bioethics 22 (4):259-266.
    Organ transplantation is a lifesaving procedure for end-organ damage and remains up to today as the most cost-effective alternative to treat these conditions. However, the main limitation to performing organ transplants is the availability of donor organs suitable for transplantation. To increase the donor pool, expanding organ donation from the conventional neurologic determination of death (NDD) to include circulatory determination of death (DCD) has been a well-established method of increasing donors in other countries. In this article, we discuss the clinical (...)
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  12. Ethical issues of organ donation after circulatory death: Considerations for a successful implementation in Chile.Pablo Pérez Castro & Sofía P. Salas - 2022 - Developing World Bioethics 22 (4):259-266.
    Organ transplantation is a lifesaving procedure for end-organ damage and remains up to today as the most cost-effective alternative to treat these conditions. However, the main limitation to performing organ transplants is the availability of donor organs suitable for transplantation. To increase the donor pool, expanding organ donation from the conventional neurologic determination of death (NDD) to include circulatory determination of death (DCD) has been a well-established method of increasing donors in other countries. In this article, we discuss the clinical (...)
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  13. Public Perception of Organ Donation and Transplantation Policies in Southern Spain.Gonzalo Díaz-Cobacho, Maite Cruz-Piqueras, Janet Delgado, Joaquín Hortal-Carmona, María Victoria Martínez-López, Alberto Molina-Pérez, Álvaro Padilla-Pozo, Julia Ranchal-Romero & David Rodríguez-Arias - 2022 - Transplantation Proceedings 54 (3):567-574.
    Background: This research explores how public awareness and attitudes toward donation and transplantation policies may contribute to Spain's success in cadaveric organ donation. Materials and Methods: A representative sample of 813 people residing in Andalusia (Southern Spain) were surveyed by telephone or via Internet between October and December 2018. Results: Most participants trust Spain's donation and transplantation system (93%) and wish to donate their organs after death (76%). Among donors, a majority have expressed their consent (59%), and few nondonors have (...)
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  14. Altruistic Organ Donation: On Giving a Kidney to a Stranger.Leonard Fleck & Arthur Ward - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (3):395-399.
    In the following interview, philosophers Leonard Fleck and Arthur Ward discuss the latter’s recent experience of being a nondirected kidney donor. The interview took place in the Center for Bioethics and Social Justice at Michigan State University.
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  15. Justifying the risks of COVID-19 challenge trials: The analogy with organ donation.Athmeya Jayaram, Jacob Sparks & Daniel Callies - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (1):100-106.
    In the beginning of the COVID pandemic, researchers and bioethicists called for human challenge trials to hasten the development of a vaccine for COVID. However, the fact that we lacked a specific, highly effective treatment for COVID led many to argue that a COVID challenge trial would be unethical and we ought to pursue traditional phase III testing instead. These ethical objections to challenge trials may have slowed the progress of a COVID vaccine, so it is important to evaluate their (...)
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  16. Medical Ersatz Liturgies of Death: Anatomical Dissection and Organ Donation as Biopolitical Practices.Kimbell Kornu - 2022 - Heythrop Journal 63 (3):386-400.
  17. Opt-in Vs. Opt-out of Organ Donation in Scotland: Bioethical analysis.Allister Lee & Joseph Tham - 2022 - The New Bioethics 28 (4):341-349.
    This paper looks at the ethics of opt-in vs. opt-out of organ donation as Scotland has transitioned its systems to promote greater organ availability. We first analyse studies that compare the donation rates in other regions due to such a system switch and find that organ increase is inconclusive and modest at best. This is due to a lack of explicit opt-out choices resulting in greater resistance and family override unless there are infrastructures and greater awareness to support such change. (...)
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  18. Should the family have a role in deceased organ donation decision-making? A systematic review of public knowledge and attitudes towards organ procurement policies in Europe.Alberto Molina-Pérez, Janet Delgado, Mihaela Frunza, Myfanwy Morgan, Gurch Randhawa, Jeantine Reiger-Van de Wijdeven, Silke Schicktanz, Eline Schiks, Sabine Wöhlke & David Rodríguez-Arias - 2022 - Transplantation Reviews 36 (1).
    Goal: To assess public knowledge and attitudes towards the family’s role in deceased organ donation in Europe. -/- Methods: A systematic search was conducted in CINHAL, MEDLINE, PAIS Index, Scopus, PsycINFO, and Web of Science on December 15th, 2017. Eligibility criteria were socio-empirical studies conducted in Europe from 2008 to 2017 addressing either knowledge or attitudes by the public towards the consent system, including the involvement of the family in the decision-making process, for post-mortem organ retrieval. Screening and data collection (...)
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  19. Differential impact of opt-in, opt-out policies on deceased organ donation rates: a mixed conceptual and empirical study.Alberto Molina-Pérez, David Rodríguez-Arias & Janet Delgado - 2022 - BMJ Open 12:e057107.
    Objectives To increase postmortem organ donation rates, several countries are adopting an opt-out (presumed consent) policy, meaning that individuals are deemed donors unless they expressly refused so. Although opt-out countries tend to have higher donation rates, there is no conclusive evidence that this is caused by the policy itself. The main objective of this study is to better assess the direct impact of consent policy defaults per se on deceased organ recovery rates when considering the role of the family in (...)
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  20. Can double‐effect reasoning justify lethal organ donation?Adam Omelianchuk - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (6):648-654.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 6, Page 648-654, July 2022.
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  21. The inviolateness of life and equal protection: a defense of the dead-donor rule.Adam Omelianchuk - 2022 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 43 (1):1-27.
    There are increasing calls for rejecting the ‘dead donor’ rule and permitting ‘organ donation euthanasia’ in organ transplantation. I argue that the fundamental problem with this proposal is that it would bestow more worth on the organs than the donor who has them. What is at stake is the basis of human equality, which, I argue, should be based on an ineliminable dignity that each of us has in virtue of having a rational nature. To allow mortal harvesting would be (...)
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  22. Ethical Issues Concerning Organ Donation.John J. Paris - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (3):344-347.
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  23. Healthcare students support opt-out organ donation for practical and moral reasons.Long Qian, Miah T. Li, Kristen L. King, Syed Ali Husain, David J. Cohen & Sumit Mohan - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (8):522-529.
    Background and purpose Changes to deceased organ donation policy in the USA, including opt-out and priority systems, have been proposed to increase registration and donation rates. To study attitudes towards such policies, we surveyed healthcare students to assess support for opt-out and priority systems and reasons for support or opposition. Methods We investigated associations with supporting opt-out, including organ donation knowledge, altruism, trust in the healthcare system, prioritising autonomy and participants’ evaluation of the moral severity of incorrectly assuming consent in (...)
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  24. Restrictivism, Abortion, and Organ Donation.William Simkulet - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (3):348-354.
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  25. Ethical Analysis of Appropriate Incentive Measures Promoting Organ Donation in Bangladesh.Md Sanwar Siraj - 2022 - Asian Bioethics Review 14 (3):237-257.
    Bangladesh, a Muslim-majority country, has a national organ donation law that was passed in 1999 and revised in 2018. The law allows living-related and brain-dead donor organ transplantation. There are no legal barriers to these two types of organ donations, but there is no legislation providing necessary costs and incentive measures associated with successful organ transplants. However, many governments across the globe provide different types of incentives for motivating living donors and families of deceased donors. This study assesses the merits (...)
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  26. How a compensated kidney donation program facilitates the sale of human organs in a regulated market: the implications of Islam on organ donation and sale.Md Sanwar Siraj - 2022 - Philosophy, Ethics and Humanities in Medicine 17 (1):1-18.
    Background Advocates for a regulated system to facilitate kidney donation between unrelated donor-recipient pairs argue that monetary compensation encourages people to donate vital organs that save the lives of patients with end-stage organ failure. Scholars support compensating donors as a form of reciprocity. This study aims to assess the compensation system for the unrelated kidney donation program in the Islamic Republic of Iran, with a particular focus on the implications of Islam on organ donation and organ sales. Methods This study (...)
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  27. Organ trafficking: why do healthcare professionals engage in it?Trevor Stammers - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (3):368-378.
    Organ trafficking in all its various forms is an international crime which could be entirely eliminated if healthcare professionals refused to participate in or be complicit with it. Types of organ trafficking are defined and principal international declarations and resolutions concerning it are discussed. The evidence for the involvement of healthcare professionals is illustrated with examples from South Africa and China. The ways in which healthcare professionals directly or indirectly perpetuate illegal organ transplantation are then considered, including lack of awareness, (...)
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  28. An Ethical Defense of a Mandated Choice Consent Procedure for Deceased Organ Donation.Xavier Symons & Billy Poulden - 2022 - Asian Bioethics Review 14 (3):259-270.
    Organ transplant shortages are ubiquitous in healthcare systems around the world. In response, several commentators have argued for the adoption of an opt-out policy for organ transplantation, whereby individuals would by default be registered as organ donors unless they informed authorities of their desire to opt-out. This may potentially lead to an increase in donation rates. An opt-out system, however, presumes consent even when it is evident that a significant minority are resistant to organ donation. In this article, we defend (...)
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  29. ‘Take my kidneys but not my corneas’—Selective preferences as a hidden problem for ‘opt‐out’ organ donation policy.Nicola Jane Williams & Neil C. Manson - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (8):829-839.
    With aims to both increase organ supply and better reflect individual donation preferences, many nations worldwide have shifted from ‘opt-in’ to ‘opt-out’ systems for post-mortem organ donation (PMOD). In such countries, while a prospective donor's willingness to donate their organs/tissues for PMOD was previously ascertained—at least partially—by their having recorded positive donation preferences on an official register prior to death, this willingness is now presumed or inferred—at least partially—from their not having recorded an objection to PMOD—on an official organ donation (...)
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  30. Unfinished Lives and Multiple Deaths: Bodies, Buddhists and Organ Donation.Tanya Maria Zivkovic - 2022 - Body and Society 28 (3):63-88.
    This article examines an Australian campaign to increase organ and tissue donation for transplantation. It analyses the use of the gift rhetoric to promote community awareness and resources, target migrant groups, and recruit cultural and religious leaders to endorse organ and tissue donation as an altruistic act. In unpacking this ‘gift of life’ approach to organ donation, it explores the convergence of medical and religious bodies and pushes beyond uniform determinations of death to reveal how multiple deaths transpire in organ (...)
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  31. May I give my heart away? On the permissibility of living vital organ donation.Didde B. Andersen - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (8):812-819.
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  32. Religious, Cultural and Legal Barriers to Organ Donation: The Case of Bangladesh.Md Shaikh Farid & Tahrima Binta Naim Mou - 2021 - Bangladesh Journal of Bioethics 12 (1):1-13.
    There is a substantial shortage of organs available for transplantation in Bangladesh. This has resulted in the commodification of organs. This study analyzes the religious, cultural, and legal barriers to organ donation in Bangladesh. It is based on the examination of available literature and primary sources i.e. religious decrees and opinions of religious leaders of faith traditions, and the Bangladesh Organ Donation Act, 1999. The literature was retrieved from databases, such as PubMed, BioMed, and Google Scholar using the key words: (...)
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  33. The COVID-19 pandemic and organ donation and transplantation: ethical issues.Marie-Chantal Fortin, T. Murray Wilson, Lindsay C. Wilson, Matthew-John Weiss, Christy Simpson, Laura Hornby, David Hartell, Aviva Goldberg, Jennifer A. Chandler, Rosanne Dawson & Ban Ibrahim - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-10.
    BackgroundThe COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on the health system worldwide. The organ and tissue donation and transplantation system is no exception and has had to face ethical challenges related to the pandemic, such as risks of infection and resource allocation. In this setting, many Canadian transplant programs halted their activities during the first wave of the pandemic.MethodTo inform future ethical guidelines related to the COVID-19 pandemic or other public health emergencies of international concern, we conducted a literature (...)
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  34. Offering more without offering compensation: non-compensating benefits for living kidney donors.Kyle Fruh & Ege K. Duman - 2021 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 24 (4):711-719.
    While different positions on the permissibility of organ markets enjoy support, there is widespread agreement that some benefits to living organ donors are acceptable and do not raise the same moral concerns associated with organ markets, such as exploitation and commodification. We argue on the basis of two distinctions that some benefit packages offered to donors can defensibly surpass conventional reimbursement while stopping short of controversial cash payouts. The first distinction is between benefits that defray the costs of donating an (...)
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  35. A scoping review of the perceptions of death in the context of organ donation and transplantation.Ian Kerridge, Cameron Stewart, Linda Sheahan, Lisa O’Reilly, Michael J. O’Leary, Cynthia Forlini, Dianne Walton-Sonda, Anil Ramnani & George Skowronski - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-20.
    BackgroundSocio-cultural perceptions surrounding death have profoundly changed since the 1950s with development of modern intensive care and progress in solid organ transplantation. Despite broad support for organ transplantation, many fundamental concepts and practices including brain death, organ donation after circulatory death, and some antemortem interventions to prepare for transplantation continue to be challenged. Attitudes toward the ethical issues surrounding death and organ donation may influence support for and participation in organ donation but differences between and among diverse populations have not (...)
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  36. Opt-Out to the Rescue: Organ Donation and Samaritan Duties.Sören Flinch Midtgaard & Andreas Albertsen - 2021 - Public Health Ethics 14 (2):191-201.
    Deceased organ donation is widely considered as a case of easy rescue―that is, a case in which A may bestow considerable benefits on B while incurring negligent costs herself. Yet, the policy implications of this observation remain unclear. Drawing on Christopher H. Wellman’s samaritan account of political obligations, the paper develops a case for a so-called opt-out system, i.e., a scheme in which people are defaulted into being donors. The proposal’s key idea is that we may arrange people’s options in (...)
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  37. European and comparative law study regarding family’s legal role in deceased organ procurement.Marina Morla-González, Clara Moya-Guillem, Janet Delgado & Alberto Molina-Pérez - 2021 - Revista General de Derecho Público Comparado 29.
    Several European countries are approving legislative reforms moving to a presumed consent system in order to increase organ donation rates. Nevertheless, irrespective of the consent system in force, family's decisional capacity probably causes a greater impact on such rates. In this contribution we have developed a systematic methodology in order to analyse and compare European organ procurement laws, and we clarify the weight given by each European law to relatives' decisional capacity over individual's preferences (expressed or not while alive) regarding (...)
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  38. Addressing organ shortage: An automatic organ procurement model as a proposal.Marina Morla-González, Clara Moya-Guillem, David Rodríguez-Arias, Íñigo de Miguel Beriain, Alberto Molina-Pérez & Iván Ortega-Deballon - 2021 - Clinical Ethics 16 (4):278-290.
    Organ shortage constitutes an unsolved problem for every country that offers transplantation as a therapeutic option. Besides the largely implemented donation model and the eventually implemented market model, a theorized automatic organ procurement model has raised a rich debate in the legal, medical and bioethical community, since it could show a higher potential to solve organ shortage. In this paper, we study the main arguments for and against this model. We show how, in the light of empirical data extracted from (...)
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  39. La confiscación de órganos a la luz del derecho constitucional a la protección de la salud.Clara Moya-Guillem, David Rodríguez-Arias, Marina Morla, Íñigo de Miguel, Alberto Molina-Pérez & Iván Ortega-Deballon - 2021 - Revista Española de Derecho Constitucional 122:183-213.
    This paper analyses the arguments for and against what we have called automatic organ procurement model in relation to the organs of the deceased. For this purpose, this work provides empirical evidence to assess the potential impact of this model on donation rates and on public opinion. Specifically, we examine first the reasons supporting this model, with special reference to utilitarian and justice arguments. On the other hand, we analyse both the approaches based on the violation of pre mortem and (...)
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  40. The New Definitions of Death for Organ Donation: A Multidisciplinary Analysis from the Perspective of Christian Ethics by Doyen Nguyen. [REVIEW]Adam Omelianchuk - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (1):180-182.
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  41. Protecting Autonomy and Dignity in Organ Donation Postmortem through Family Decision Making.Paul Riffon - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (2):263-279.
    Often-cited papal pronouncements regarding organ donation emphasize the importance of gift giving and the consent of the donor. However, a critical reading reveals an ill-defined separation of living organ donation and donation after death. Given that a corpse cannot engage in gift giving, nor can it give consent, the family, acting as good stewards, is the proper decision maker for organ donation after death. A historical examination of relics and human anatomical dissection reveals that the Catholic Church has primarily favored (...)
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  42. Governance quality indicators for organ procurement policies.David Rodríguez-Arias, Alberto Molina-Pérez, Ivar R. Hannikainen, Janet Delgado, Benjamin Söchtig, Sabine Wöhlke & Silke Schicktanz - 2021 - PLoS ONE 16 (6):e0252686.
    Background Consent policies for post-mortem organ procurement (OP) vary throughout Europe, and yet no studies have empirically evaluated the ethical implications of contrasting consent models. To fill this gap, we introduce a novel indicator of governance quality based on the ideal of informed support, and examine national differences on this measure through a quantitative survey of OP policy informedness and preferences in seven European countries. -/- Methods Between 2017–2019, we conducted a convenience sample survey of students (n = 2006) in (...)
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  43. Organ donation after euthanasia starting at home in a patient with multiple system atrophy.Walther van Mook, Jan Bollen, Wim de Jongh, A. Kempener-Deguelle, David Shaw, Elien Pragt, Nathalie van Dijk & Najat Tajaâte - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-6.
    Background A patient who fulfils the due diligence requirements for euthanasia, and is medically suitable, is able to donate his organs after euthanasia in Belgium, the Netherlands and Canada. Since 2012, more than 70 patients have undergone this combined procedure in the Netherlands. Even though all patients who undergo euthanasia are suffering hopelessly and unbearably, some of these patients are nevertheless willing to help others in need of an organ. Organ donation after euthanasia is a so-called donation after circulatory death, (...)
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  44. Against the family veto in organ procurement: Why the wishes of the dead should prevail when the living and the deceased disagree on organ donation.Andreas Albertsen - 2020 - Bioethics 34 (3):272-280.
    The wishes of registered organ donors are regularly set aside when family members object to donation. This genuine overruling of the wishes of the deceased raises difficult ethical questions. A successful argument for providing the family with a veto must (a) provide reason to disregard the wishes of the dead, and (b) establish why the family should be allowed to decide. One branch of justification seeks to reconcile the family veto with important ideas about respecting property rights, preserving autonomy, and (...)
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  45. If the Price is Right: The Ethics and Efficiency of Market Solutions to the Organ Shortage.Andreas Albertsen - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (3):357-367.
    Due to the shortage of organs, it has been proposed that the ban on organ sales is lifted and a market-based procurement system introduced. This paper assesses four prominent proposals for how such a market could be arranged: unregulated current market, regulated current market, payment-for-consent futures market, and the family-reward futures market. These are assessed in terms of how applicable prominent concerns with organ sales are for each model. The concerns evaluated are that organ markets will crowd out altruistic donation, (...)
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  46. Assessing deemed consent in Wales - the advantages of a broad difference-in-difference design.Andreas Albertsen - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (3):211-212.
    As the debate over an English opt-out policy for organ procurement intensifies, assessing existing experiences becomes even more important. The Welsh introduction of opt-out legislation provides one important point of reference. With the introduction of deemed consent in December 2015, Wales became the first part of the UK to introduce an opt-out system in organ procurement. My article ‘Deemed consent: assessing the new opt-out approach to organ procurement in Wales’ conducted an early assessment of this.1 Taking its starting point in (...)
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  47. The role of the family in deceased organ procurement: A guide for Clinitians and Policymakers.Janet Delgado, Alberto Molina-Pérez, David M. Shaw & David Rodríguez-Arias - 2019 - Transplantation 103 (5):e112-e118.
    Families play an essential role in deceased organ procurement. As the person cannot directly communicate his or her wishes regarding donation, the family is often the only source of information regarding consent or refusal. We provide a systematic description and analysis of the different roles the family can play, and actions the family can take, in the organ procurement process across different jurisdictions and consent systems. First, families can inform or update healthcare professionals about a person’s donation wishes. Second, families (...)
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  48. Kidney Sales and the Burden of Proof.Julian Koplin & Michael Selgelid - 2019 - Journal of Practical Ethics 7 (3):32-53.
    Janet Radcliffe Richards’ The Ethics of Transplants outlines a novel framework for moral inquiry in practical contexts and applies it to the topic of paid living kidney donation. In doing so, Radcliffe Richards makes two key claims: that opponents of organ markets bear the burden of proof, and that this burden has not yet been satisfied. This paper raises four related objections to Radcliffe Richards’ methodological framework, focusing largely on how Radcliffe Richards uses this framework in her discussion of kidney (...)
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  49. Public knowledge and attitudes towards consent policies for organ donation in Europe. A systematic review.Alberto Molina-Pérez, David Rodríguez-Arias, Janet Delgado-Rodríguez, Myfanwy Morgan, Mihaela Frunza, Gurch Randhawa, Jeantine Reiger-Van de Wijdeven, Eline Schiks, Sabine Wöhlke & Silke Schicktanz - 2019 - Transplantation Reviews 33 (1):1-8.
    Background: Several countries have recently changed their model of consent for organ donation from opt-in to opt-out. We undertook a systematic review to determine public knowledge and attitudes towards these models in Europe. Methods: Six databases were explored between 1 January 2008 and 15 December 2017. We selected empirical studies addressing either knowledge or attitudes towards the systems of consent for deceased organ donation by lay people in Europe, including students. Study selection, data extraction, and quality assessment were conducted by (...)
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  50. Will more organs save more lives? Cost‐effectiveness and the ethics of expanding organ procurement.Govind Persad - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (6):684-690.
    The assumption that procuring more organs will save more lives has inspired increasingly forceful calls to increase organ procurement. This project, in contrast, directly questions the premise that more organ transplantation means more lives saved. Its argument begins with the fact that resources are limited and medical procedures have opportunity costs. Because many other lifesaving interventions are more cost‐effective than transplantation and compete with transplantation for a limited budget, spending on organ transplantation consumes resources that could have been used to (...)
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