Results for 'T. Mark Ellison'

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  1.  11
    Eye-Fixation Behavior, Lexical Storage, and Visual Word Recognition in a Split Processing Model.Richard Shillcock, T. Mark Ellison & Padraic Monaghan - 2000 - Psychological Review 107 (4):824-851.
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  2.  13
    Creating a Communication System From Scratch: Gesture Beats Vocalization Hands Down.Nicolas Fay, Casey J. Lister, T. Mark Ellison & Susan Goldin-Meadow - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
  3.  13
    Ethics Across the Curriculum—Pedagogical Perspectives.Elaine E. Englehardt, Michael S. Pritchard, Robert Baker, Michael D. Burroughs, José A. Cruz-Cruz, Randall Curren, Michael Davis, Aine Donovan, Deni Elliott, Karin D. Ellison, Challie Facemire, William J. Frey, Joseph R. Herkert, Karlana June, Robert F. Ladenson, Christopher Meyers, Glen Miller, Deborah S. Mower, Lisa H. Newton, David T. Ozar, Alan A. Preti, Wade L. Robison, Brian Schrag, Alan Tomhave, Phyllis Vandenberg, Mark Vopat, Sandy Woodson, Daniel E. Wueste & Qin Zhu - 2018 - Springer Verlag.
    Late in 1990, the Center for the Study of Ethics in the Professions at Illinois Institute of Technology (lIT) received a grant of more than $200,000 from the National Science Foundation to try a campus-wide approach to integrating professional ethics into its technical curriculum.! Enough has now been accomplished to draw some tentative conclusions. I am the grant's principal investigator. In this paper, I shall describe what we at lIT did, what we learned, and what others, especially philosophers, can learn (...)
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  4.  16
    Review: T.L.S. Sprigge,The Rational Foundations of Ethics. [REVIEW]Mark T. Nelson - 1989 - Philosophical Books 30 (1):49-51.
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  5.  12
    Joan T. Mark.Joy Harvey & Margaret W. Rossiter - 2017 - Isis 108 (3):651-653.
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  6. The Folk Strike Back; or, Why You Didn’T Do It Intentionally, Though It Was Bad and You Knew It.Mark T. Phelan & Hagop Sarkissian - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 138 (2):291 - 298.
    Recent and puzzling experimental results suggest that people’s judgments as to whether or not an action was performed intentionally are sensitive to moral considerations. In this paper, we outline these results and evaluate two accounts which purport to explain them. We then describe a recent experiment that allegedly vindicates one of these accounts and present our own findings to show that it fails to do so. Finally, we present additional data suggesting no such vindication could be in the offing and (...)
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  7.  8
    Knowledge and Evidence. [REVIEW]Mark T. Nelson - 1993 - Philosophical Quarterly 43 (171):242-244.
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  8.  36
    The Principle of Sufficient Reason: A Moral Argument: MARK T. NELSON.Mark T. Nelson - 1996 - Religious Studies 32 (1):15-26.
    The Clarke/Rowe version of the Cosmological Argument is sound only if the Principle of Sufficient Reason is true, but many philosophers, including Rowe, think that there is not adequate evidence for the principle of sufficient reason. I argue that there may be indirect evidence for PSR on the grounds that if we do not accept it, we lose our best justification for an important principle of metaethics, namely, the Principle of Universalizability. To show this, I argue that all the other (...)
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  9.  33
    Temporal Wholes and the Problem of Evil: MARK T. NELSON.Mark T. Nelson - 1993 - Religious Studies 29 (3):313-324.
    This article is not intended to state what I positively believe to be true, but to make a suggestion which I think it well-worth working out. The suggestion is not altogether unfamiliar, but it has certain implications that seem to have been so far overlooked, or at any rate have never been developed. I do not think that it is the duty of a philosopher to confine himself in his publications to working out theories of the truth of which he (...)
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  10.  25
    Stephen T. Davis God, Reason and Theistic Proofs. (Edinburgh University Press, 1997). [REVIEW]Mark T. Nelson - 1999 - Religious Studies 35 (1):99-111.
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  11.  7
    Stephen T. Davis God, Reason and Theistic Proofs. (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1997). Pp. Xiv+204. £11.99 Pbk. [REVIEW]Mark T. Nelson - 1999 - Religious Studies 35 (1):99-111.
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  12.  11
    Book Review:An Outline of the History of Educational Theories in England. H. T. Mark[REVIEW]W. J. Greenstreet - 1899 - Ethics 10 (1):113-.
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  13. We Have No Positive Epistemic Duties.Mark T. Nelson - 2010 - Mind 119 (473):83-102.
    In ethics, it is commonly supposed that we have both positive duties and negative duties, things we ought to do and things we ought not to do. Given the many parallels between ethics and epistemology, we might suppose that the same is true in epistemology, and that we have both positive epistemic duties and negative epistemic duties. I argue that this is false; that is, that we have negative epistemic duties, but no positive ones. There are things that we ought (...)
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  14. Toward a Theory of Episodic Memory: The Frontal Lobes and Autonoetic Consciousness.Mark A. Wheeler, Stuss, T. Donald & Endel Tulving - 1997 - Psychological Bulletin 121:331-54.
  15.  17
    Unregulated Health Research Using Mobile Devices: Ethical Considerations and Policy Recommendations.Mark A. Rothstein, John T. Wilbanks, Laura M. Beskow, Kathleen M. Brelsford, Kyle B. Brothers, Megan Doerr, Barbara J. Evans, Catherine M. Hammack-Aviran, Michelle L. McGowan & Stacey A. Tovino - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (S1):196-226.
    Mobile devices with health apps, direct-to-consumer genetic testing, crowd-sourced information, and other data sources have enabled research by new classes of researchers. Independent researchers, citizen scientists, patient-directed researchers, self-experimenters, and others are not covered by federal research regulations because they are not recipients of federal financial assistance or conducting research in anticipation of a submission to the FDA for approval of a new drug or medical device. This article addresses the difficult policy challenge of promoting the welfare and interests of (...)
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  16.  11
    An Outline of the History of Educational Theories in England, by H. T. Mark.W. J. Greenstreet - 1899 - Ethics 10:113.
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  17.  23
    An Outline of the History of Educational Theories in England. H. T. Mark.W. J. Greenstreet - 1899 - International Journal of Ethics 10 (1):113-116.
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  18.  10
    What the Problem with Aquinas Isn't.Mark T. Nelson - 2006 - New Blackfriars 87 (1012):605-616.
    Bertrand Russell famously said of Thomas Aquinas, ‘There is little of the true philosophic spirit in Aquinas. He does not, like the Platonic Socrates, set out to follow wherever the argument may lead.’ Russell’s criticism here presupposes that philosophical beliefs ought to ‘track’ the conclusions of the best arguments but that Aquinas’ religious commitments prevent his beliefs from doing this. Elsewhere, I have defended Aquinas from this ‘Failure to Track’ objection on the grounds that it enshrines an arbitrary and unreasonable (...)
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  19.  25
    Flaws in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Rationale for Supporting the Development and Approval of BiDil as a Treatment for Heart Failure Only in Black Patients.George T. H. Ellison, Jay S. Kaufman, Rosemary F. Head, Paul A. Martin & Jonathan D. Kahn - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (3):449-457.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's rationale for supporting the development and approval of BiDil for heart failure specifically in black patients was based on under-powered, post hoc subgroup analyses of two relatively old trials , which were further complicated by substantial covariate imbalances between racial groups. Indeed, the only statistically significant difference observed between black and white patients was found without any adjustment for potential confounders in samples that were unlikely to have been adequately randomized. Meanwhile, because the accepted (...)
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  20.  43
    Iconicity.Nicolas Fay, Mark Ellison & Simon Garrod - 2014 - Pragmatics and Cognition 22 (2):244-263.
    This paper explores the role of iconicity in spoken language and other human communication systems. First, we concentrate on graphical and gestural communication and show how semantically motivated iconic signs play an important role in creating such communication systems from scratch. We then consider how iconic signs tend to become simplified and symbolic as the communication system matures and argue that this process is driven by repeated interactive use of the signs. We then consider evidence for iconicity at the level (...)
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  21.  38
    Iconicity: From Sign to System in Human Communication and Language.Nicolas Fay, Mark Ellison & Simon Garrod - 2014 - Pragmatics and Cognition 22 (2):244-263.
    This paper explores the role of iconicity in spoken language and other human communication systems. First, we concentrate on graphical and gestural communication and show how semantically motivated iconic signs play an important role in creating such communication systems from scratch. We then consider how iconic signs tend to become simplified and symbolic as the communication system matures and argue that this process is driven by repeated interactive use of the signs. We then consider evidence for iconicity at the level (...)
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  22.  25
    Constraints on Analogical Mapping: A Comparison of Three Models.Mark T. Keane, Tim Ledgeway & Stuart Duff - 1994 - Cognitive Science 18 (3):387-438.
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  23.  5
    When Do Pediatricians Call the Ethics Consultation Service? Impact of Clinical Experience and Formal Ethics Training.Mark C. Navin, Jason Adam Wasserman, Susanna Jain, Katie R. Baughman & Naomi T. Laventhal - 2020 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 11 (2):83-90.
    Background: Previous research shows that pediatricians inconsistently utilize the ethics consultation service (ECS). Methods: Pediatricians in two suburban, Midwestern academic hospitals were asked to reflect on their ethics training and utilization of ECS via an anonymous, electronic survey distributed in 2017 and 2018, and analyzed in 2018. Participants reported their clinical experience, exposure to formal and informal ethics training, use of formal and informal ethics consultations, and potential barriers to formal consultation. Results: Less experienced pediatricians were more likely to utilize (...)
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  24.  26
    Michael Polanyi: The Art of Knowing.Mark T. Mitchell - 2006 - Intercollegiate Studies Institute.
    The polymath Michael Polanyi first made his mark as a physical chemist, but his interests gradually shifted to economics, politics, and philosophy, in which field he would ultimately propose a revolutionary theory of knowledge that grew out of his firsthand experience with both the scientific method and political totalitarianism. In this sixth entry in ISI Books’ Library of Modern Thinkers’ series, Mark T. Mitchell reveals how Polanyi came to recognize that the roots of the modern political and spiritual (...)
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  25.  16
    Normative Study of Age Variation in Salivary Progesterone Profiles.S. F. Lipson & P. T. Ellison - 1992 - Journal of Biosocial Science 24 (2):233-244.
    Daily luteal progesterone levels were measured for 124 regularly menstruating women, aged 18–44, by radioimmunoassay of steroid levels in saliva. A consistent pattern of age variation in luteal function was found, with the lowest levels of progesterone in the 18–19-year-old and 40–44-year-old groups, the highest values in the 25–34 year olds, and intermediate values in the 20–24 and 35–39-year-old groups. The striking similarity of this pattern of age variation with empirically and theoretically generated curves of apparent fecundability, suggests that age-related (...)
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  26.  16
    Citizen Science on Your Smartphone: An ELSI Research Agenda: Currents in Contemporary Bioethics.Mark A. Rothstein, John T. Wilbanks & Kyle B. Brothers - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (4):897-903.
    Beginning in the 20th century, scientific research came to be dominated by a growing class of credentialed, professional scientists who overwhelmingly displaced the learned amateurs of an earlier time. By the end of the century, however, the exclusive realm of professional scientists conducting research was joined, to a degree, by “citizen scientists.” The term originally encompassed non-professionals assisting professional scientists by contributing observations and measurements to ongoing research enterprises. These collaborations were especially common in the environmental sciences, where citizen scientists (...)
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  27.  26
    Extinction and Descent.Peter T. Ellison - 1994 - Human Nature 5 (2):155-165.
    The probability of lineal extinction is sensitive to all the moments of the reproductive success probability distribution. In particular, high variance in reproductive success is associated with high probability of lineal extinction. Where male variance in reproductive success exceeds female variance, strictly patrilineal lines of descent will become extinct more rapidly than strictly matrilineal lines of descent. Patrilineal genealogies will be expected to be shallower and broader than matrilineal genealogies under such conditions. Potential implications of this genealogical asymmetry for human (...)
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  28.  53
    Anthropological Insights Into the Use of Race/Ethnicity to Explore Genetic Contributions to Disparities in Health.Simon M. Outram & George T. H. Ellison - 2006 - Journal of Biosocial Science 38 (1):83-102.
    Anthropological insights into the use of race/ethnicity to explore genetic contributions to disparities in health were developed using in-depth qualitative interviews with editorial staff from nineteen genetics journals, focusing on the methodological and conceptual mechanisms required to make race/ethnicity a genetic variable. As such, these analyses explore how and why race/ethnicity comes to be used in the context of genetic research, set against the background of continuing critiques from anthropology and related human sciences that focus on the social construction, structural (...)
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  29.  18
    Lactational Amenorrhoea in Well-Nourished Toba Women of Formosa, Argentina.Claudia Valeggia & Peter T. Ellison - 2004 - Journal of Biosocial Science 36 (5):573-595.
  30. Moral Realism and Program Explanation.Mark T. Nelson - 2006 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (3):417 – 428.
    Alexander Miller has recently considered an ingenious extension of Frank Jackson and Philip Pettit's account of 'program explanation' as a way of defending non-reductive naturalist versions of moral realism against Harman's explanatory criticism. Despite the ingenuity of this extension, Miller concludes that program explanation cannot help such moral realists in their attempt to defend moral properties. Specifically, he argues that such moral program explanations are dispensable from an epistemically unlimited point of view. I show that Miller's argument for this negative (...)
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  31.  65
    The Potential of the Human Embryo.Mark T. Brown - 2007 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (6):585 – 618.
    A higher order potential analysis of moral status clarifies the issues that divide Human Being Theorists who oppose embryo research from Person Theorists who favor embryo research. Higher order potential personhood is transitive if it is active, identity preserving and morally relevant. If the transition from the Second Order Potential of the embryo to the First Order Potential of an infant is transitive, opponents of embryo research make a powerful case for the moral status of the embryo. If it is (...)
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  32.  61
    Utilitarian Eschatology.Mark T. Nelson - 1991 - American Philosophical Quarterly 28 (4):339-47.
    Traditional utilitarianism, when applied, implies a surprising prediction about the future, viz., that all experience of pleasure and pain must end once and for all, or infinitely dwindle. Not only is this implication surprising, it should render utilitarianism unacceptable to persons who hold any of the following theses: that evaluative propositions may not imply descriptive, factual propositions; that evaluative propositions may not imply contingent factual propositions about the future; that there will always exist beings who experience pleasure or pain.
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  33.  26
    Logical Forms: An Introduction to Philosophical Logic.T. S. Champlin & Mark Sainsbury - 1992 - Philosophical Quarterly 42 (167):243.
    Logical Forms explains both the detailed problems involved in finding logical forms and also the theoretical underpinnings of philosophical logic. In this revised edition, exercises are integrated throughout the book. The result is a genuinely interactive introduction which engages the reader in developing the argument. Each chapter concludes with updated notes to guide further reading.
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  34.  60
    Variations in Variation and Selection: The Ubiquity of the Variation-and-Selective-Retention Ratchet in Emergent Organizational Complexity. [REVIEW]Mark H. Bickhard & Donald T. Campbell - 2003 - Foundations of Science 8 (3):215-282.
    The variation and selection form of explanationcan be prescinded from the evolutionary biologyhome ground in which it was discovered and forwhich it has been most developed. When this isdone, variation and selection explanations arefound to have potential application to a widerange of phenomena, far beyond the classicalbiological ground and the contemporaryextensions into epistemological domains. Itappears as the form of explanation most suitedto phenomena of fit. It is also found toparticipate in multiple interestingrelationships with other forms of explanation. We proceed with (...)
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  35. Evidence That Stakes Don’T Matter for Evidence.Mark Phelan - 2013 - Philosophical Psychology 27 (4):488-512.
  36. More Bad News for the Logical Autonomy of Ethics.Mark T. Nelson - 2007 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (2):203-216.
    Are there good arguments from Is to Ought? Toomas Karmo has claimed that there are trivially valid arguments from Is to Ought, but no sound ones. I call into question some key elements of Karmo’s argument for the “logical autonomy of ethics”, and show that attempts to use it as part of an overall case for moral skepticism would be self-defeating.
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  37.  70
    Mark T. Conard, Ed. (2009) The Philosophy of the Coen Brothers.Taylor Benjamin Worley - 2011 - Film-Philosophy 15 (1):240-246.
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  38.  62
    A Brief Symposium on Mark Mitchell’s Michael Polanyi.Paul Lewis, Walter Gulick & Mark T. Mitchell - 2007 - Tradition and Discovery 34 (2):30-38.
    Paul Lewis and Walter Gulick summarize and evaluate Mark Micthell’s new book, Michael Polanyi: The Art of Knowing, and Mitchell responds to their comments in this symposium article.
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  39.  48
    The Moral Status of the Human Embryo.Mark T. Brown - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (2):132-158.
    Moral status ascribes equal obligations and rights to individuals on the basis of membership in a protected group. Substance change is an event that results in the origin or cessation of individuals who may be members of groups with equal moral status. In this paper, two substance changes that affect the moral status of human embryos are identified. The first substance change begins with fertilization and ends with the formation of the blastocyst, a biological individual with moral status comparable to (...)
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  40.  11
    Reason's Traces: Identity and Interpretation in Indian and Tibetan Buddhist Thought.Mark Siderits & Matthew T. Kapstein - 2004 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 124 (4):824.
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  41.  3
    Introduction: Unregulated Health Research Using Mobile Devices.Mark A. Rothstein & John T. Wilbanks - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (S1):7-8.
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  42. Behavioral Endocrinology: Integrating Mind and Body.Peter T. Ellison - 2020 - Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture 4 (2):97-110.
    The nervous system and the endocrine system interact to integrate behavior and physiolo­gy. Hormones play an important role in this interaction, particularly steroid hormones. Other molecules, notably oxytocin, can serve both as hormones in the soma and neuro­modulators in the central nervous system. Understanding the influence of the endocrine system on human behavior, both individual and social, has been a primary focus of behav­ioral endocrinology for many decades, though technical and methodological challenges have been formidable. The recent enthusiasm for enzyme-linked (...)
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  43.  9
    More Bad News For The Logical Autonomy of Ethics.Mark T. Nelson - 2007 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (2):203-216.
    Since the time of Hume, many philosophers have thought it impossible to deduce an ‘Ought’ from an ‘Is,’ or in general to deduce ‘ethical sentences’ from purely ‘factual sentences.’ Some of these philosophers claim that this is due, not to any Special feature of ethics, but to a general feature of logic, namely, its conservativeness:A conclusion containing an ‘ought’ cannot be derived from ‘ought’-free premises. Logic is conservative; the conclusions of a valid inference are contained within the premises. You don't (...)
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  44. Multiple Personality and Personal Identity.Mark T. Brown - 2001 - Philosophical Psychology 14 (4):435 – 447.
    If personal identity consists in non-branching psychological continuity, then the sharp breaks in psychological connectedness characteristic of Multiple Personality Disorder implicitly commit psychological continuity theories to a metaphysically extravagant reification of alters. Animalist theories of personal identity avoid the reification of alternate personalities by interpreting multiple personality as a failure to integrate alternative autobiographical memory schemata. In the normal case, autobiographical memory cross-classifies a human life, and in so doing provides access to a variety of interpretative frameworks with their associated (...)
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  45.  47
    Intentionality as the Mark of the Dispositional.Ullin T. Place - 1996 - Dialectica 50 (2):91-120.
    summaryMartin and Pfeifer have claimed“that the most typical characterizations of intentionality… all fail to distinguish … mental states from …dispositional physical states.”The evidence they present in support of this thesis is examined in the light of the possibility that what it shows is that intentionality is the mark, not of the mental, but of the dispositional. Of the five marks of intentionality they discuss a critical examination shows that three of them, Brentano's inexistence of the intentional object, Searle's directedness (...)
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  46.  54
    Is It Always Fallacious to Derive Values From Facts?Mark T. Nelson - 1995 - Argumentation 9 (4):553-562.
    Charles Pigden has argued for a logical Is/Ought gap on the grounds of the conservativeness of logic. I offer a counter-example which shows that Pigden’s argument is unsound and that there need be no logical gap between Is-premises and an Ought-conclusion. My counter-example is an argument which is logically valid, has only Is-premises and an Ought-conclusion, does not purport to violate the conservativeness of logic, and does not rely on controversial assumptions about Aristotelian biology or 'institutional facts.'.
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  47. Moral Complicity in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Research.Mark T. Brown - 2009 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (1):pp. 1-22.
    Direct reprogramming of human skin cells makes available a source of pluripotent stem cells without the perceived evil of embryo destruction, but the advent of such a powerful biotechnology entangles stem cell research in other forms of moral complicity. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) research had its origins in human embryonic stem cell research and the projected biomedical applications of iPS cells almost certainly will require more embryonic stem cell research. Policies that inhibit iPSC research in order to avoid moral (...)
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  48.  19
    The Use of Maternal Weight Measurements During Antenatal Care. A National Survey of Midwifery Practice Throughout the United Kingdom.George T. H. Ellison & Mary Holliday - 1997 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 3 (4):303-317.
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  49.  16
    Lineal Inheritance and Lineal Extinction.Peter T. Ellison - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):672-672.
  50.  26
    Rewards Modulate Saccade Latency but Not Exogenous Spatial Attention.Stephen Dunne, Amanda Ellison & Daniel T. Smith - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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