Results for 'Matthew Conduct'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
Matthew David Conduct
Durham University
  1.  72
    Naïve Realism Without Disjunctivism About Experience.Matthew Conduct - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):727-736.
    I argue that the possibility of non-perceptual experience need not compel a naïve realist to adopt a disjunctive conception of experience. Instead, they can maintain that the nature of perceptual and hallucinatory experience is the same, while still claiming that perceptual experience is presentational of the objects of perception. On such a view the difference between perceptual and non-perceptual experience will lie in the nature of the objects that are so presented. I will defend a view according to which in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2.  40
    Effectiveness of a Responsible Conduct of Research Course: A Preliminary Study.Sean T. Powell, Matthew A. Allison & Michael W. Kalichman - 2007 - Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (2):249-264.
    Training in the responsible conduct of research (RCR) is required for many research trainees nationwide, but little is known about its effectiveness. For a preliminary assessment of the effectiveness of a short-term course in RCR, medical students participating in an NIH-funded summer research program at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) were surveyed using an instrument developed through focus group discussions. In the summer of 2003, surveys were administered before and after a short-term RCR course, as well as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  3.  47
    Response to Montague.Matthew Conduct - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):740-741.
  4.  5
    Matthew Strickland, War and Chivalry: The Conduct and Perception of War in England and Normandy, 1066–1217. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1996. Pp. Xxv, 387; 3 Maps and 17 Black-and-White Illustrations. $69.95.William Kapelle - 2000 - Speculum 75 (4):989-991.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  1
    Pastoral Counter-Conducts: Religious Resistance in Foucault’s Genealogy of Christianity.Matthew Chrulew - 2014 - Critical Research on Religion 2 (1):55-65.
    The internal resistance to religious forms of power is often at issue in Michel Foucault’s genealogy of Christianity. For this anti-clerical Nietzschean, religion is, like science, always a battle over bodies and souls. In his 1978 Collège de France lectures, he traced the nature and descent of an apparatus of “pastoral power” characterized by confession, direction, obedience, and sacrifice. Governmental rationality, both individualizing and totalizing, is its modern descendant. At different moments, Foucault rather infamously opposed to the pastorate and governmentality (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  13
    "Old Bruin" Commodore Matthew C. Perry: 1794-1858. The American Naval Officer Who Helped Found Liberia, Hunted Pirates in the West Indies, Practiced Diplomacy with the Sultan of Turkey and the King of the Two Sicilies; Commanded the Gulf Squadron in the Mexican War, Promoted the Steam Navy and the Shell Gun, and Conducted the Naval Expedition Which Opened Japan. [REVIEW]Boleslaw Szczesniak & Samuel Eliot Morison - 1968 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 88 (3):627.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Philosophical Methodology: The Armchair or the Laboratory?Matthew C. Haug (ed.) - 2013 - Routledge.
    What methodology should philosophers follow? Should they rely on methods that can be conducted from the armchair? Or should they leave the armchair and turn to the methods of the natural sciences, such as experiments in the laboratory? Or is this opposition itself a false one? Arguments about philosophical methodology are raging in the wake of a number of often conflicting currents, such as the growth of experimental philosophy, the resurgence of interest in metaphysical questions, and the use of formal (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  8. Experimental philosophy and the fruitfulness of normative concepts.Matthew Lindauer - 2020 - Philosophical Studies 177 (8):2129-2152.
    This paper provides a new argument for the relevance of empirical research to moral and political philosophy and a novel defense of the positive program in experimental philosophy. The argument centers on the idea that normative concepts used in moral and political philosophy can be evaluated in terms of their fruitfulness in solving practical problems. Empirical research conducted with an eye to the practical problems that are relevant to particular concepts can provide evidence of their fruitfulness along a number of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  9.  10
    Understanding the Effects of Political Environments on Unethical Behavior in Organizations.Matthew Valle, K. Michele Kacmar & Suzanne Zivnuska - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (1):173-188.
    Based on a framework that integrates job demands-resources theory, social cognitive theory Handbook of personality, Guilford Press, New York, pp 154–196, 1999) and regulatory focus theory, the purpose of this research is to investigate the relationship between perceptions of organizational politics and subsequent moral disengagement and unethical behavior. We conducted a laboratory study and also collected data in two separate surveys 6 weeks apart from 206 individuals working full time to investigate the relationships presented in our model. In both studies, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  10.  9
    Depression, Emotion and the Self: Philosophical and Interdisciplinary Perspectives.Matthew Ratcliffe & Achim Stephan (eds.) - 2014 - Imprint Academic.
    This volume addresses the question of what it is like to be depressed. Despite the vast amount of research that has been conducted into the causes and treatment of depression, the experience of depression remains poorly understood. Indeed, many depression memoirs state that the experience is impossible for others to understand. However, it is at least clear that changes in emotion, mood, and bodily feeling are central to all forms of depression, and these are the book's principal focus. In recent (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  11. The Self - Ancient and Modern.Matthew S. Santirocco, Richard Foley & Sorabji - 2000 - New York University Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Aesthetics and Action: Situations, Emotional Perception and the Kuleshov Effect.Matthew Crippen - 2019 - Synthese 198 (Suppl 9):2345-2363.
    This article focuses on situations and emotional perception. To this end, I start with the Kuleshov effect wherein identical shots of performers manifest different expressions when cut to different contexts. However, I conducted experiments with a twist, using Darth Vader and non-primates, and even here expressions varied with contexts. Building on historically and conceptually linked Gibsonian, Gestalt, phenomenological and pragmatic schools, along with consonant experimental work, I extrapolate these results to defend three interconnected points. First, I argue that while perceiving (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  13.  63
    Where Law and Morality Meet.Matthew H. Kramer - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    How are law and morality connected, how do they interact, and in what ways are they distinct? In Part I of this book, Matthew Kramer argues that moral principles can enter into the law of any jurisdiction. He contends that legal officials can invoke moral principles as laws for resolving disputes, and that they can also invoke them as threshold tests which ordinary laws must satisfy. In opposition to many other theorists, Kramer argues that these functions of moral principles (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  14.  31
    Meta-Analysis of the Association Between Emotional Clarity and Attention to Emotions.Matthew Tyler Boden & Renee J. Thompson - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (1):79-85.
    Emotional clarity and attention to emotions represent the extent to which people understand and attend to their own emotions, respectively, and are broad facets of emotional awareness, alexithymia, and emotional intelligence. To examine the extent to which these two constructs are associated, we conducted a meta-analysis of studies including well-validated self-report measures of trait clarity and attention to emotion. Clarity and attention were moderately, positively associated. Assessment instrument, but not sample gender or age, moderated the association between clarity and attention. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  15.  51
    Ethics Beyond Borders: How Health Professionals Experience Ethics in Humanitarian Assistance and Development Work.Matthew R. Hunt - 2008 - Developing World Bioethics 8 (2):59-69.
    Health professionals are involved in humanitarian assistance and development work in many regions of the world. They participate in primary health care, immunization campaigns, clinic- and hospital-based care, rehabilitation and feeding programs. In the course of this work, clinicians are frequently exposed to complex ethical issues. This paper examines how health workers experience ethics in the course of humanitarian assistance and development work. A qualitative study was conducted to consider this question. Five core themes emerged from the data, including: tension (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  16.  17
    Interactions Between a Quiz Robot and Multiple Participants: Focusing on Speech, Gaze and Bodily Conduct in Japanese and English Speakers.Akiko Yamazaki, Keiichi Yamazaki, Keiko Ikeda, Matthew Burdelski, Mihoko Fukushima, Tomoyuki Suzuki, Miyuki Kurihara, Yoshinori Kuno & Yoshinori Kobayashi - 2013 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 14 (3):366-389.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  35
    Preserving Employee Dignity During the Termination Interview: An Empirical Examination.Matthew S. Wood & Steven J. Karau - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 86 (4):519-534.
    Despite the ongoing need for managers to fire employees and the wide prevalence of downsizing and layoffs, little research has examined how the conduct of termination interviews affects employee reactions. The current research was designed to explore reactions to several commonly used termination interview practices. Two scenario-based experiments examined the effectiveness of having a third party (an HR manager or a security guard) present, mentioning the employee's positive characteristics and contributions, and using alone, discrete escort, or public escort modes (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  18.  43
    Ethical Review of Global Short-Term Medical Volunteerism.Matthew DeCamp - 2011 - HEC Forum 23 (2):91-103.
    Global short-term medical volunteerism is growing, and properly conducted, is a tool in the fight for greater global health equity. It is intrinsically ethical (i.e., it involves ethics at every step) and depends upon ethical conduct for its success. At present, ethical guidelines remain in their infancy, which presents a unique opportunity. This paper presents a set of basic ethical principles, building on prior work in this area and previously developed guidelines for international clinical research. The content of these (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  19. What Do Philosophers of Education Do? An Empirical Study of Philosophy of Education Journals.Matthew J. Hayden - 2012 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (1):1-27.
    What is philosophy of education? This question has been answered in as many ways as there are those who self-identify as philosophers of education. However, the questions our field asks and the research conducted to answer them often produce papers, essays, and manuscripts that we can read, evaluate, and ponder. This paper turns to those tangible products of our scholarly activities. The titles, abstracts, and keywords from every article published from 2000 to 2010 in four journals of educational philosophy were (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  20.  30
    The Implied Theodicy of Kant’s Religion Within the Boundaries of Mere Reason : Love as a Response to Radical Evil.Matthew Rukgaber - 2019 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 85 (2):213-233.
    This article begins with a brief survey of Kant’s pre-Critical and Critical approaches to theodicy. I maintain that his theodical response of moral faith during the Critical period appears to be a dispassionate version of what Leibniz called Fatum Christianum. Moral rationality establishes the existence and goodness of God and translates into an endless and unwavering commitment to following the moral law. I then argue that Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason offers a revision of Kant’s 1791 conception of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21. Putting the Trolley in Order: Experimental Philosophy and the Loop Case.S. Matthew Liao, Alex Wiegmann, Joshua Alexander & Gerard Vong - 2012 - Philosophical Psychology 25 (5):661-671.
    In recent years, a number of philosophers have conducted empirical studies that survey people's intuitions about various subject matters in philosophy. Some have found that intuitions vary accordingly to seemingly irrelevant facts: facts about who is considering the hypothetical case, the presence or absence of certain kinds of content, or the context in which the hypothetical case is being considered. Our research applies this experimental philosophical methodology to Judith Jarvis Thomson's famous Loop Case, which she used to call into question (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   83 citations  
  22.  40
    Medical and Nursing Students' Television Viewing Habits: Potential Implications for Bioethics.Matthew J. Czarny, Ruth R. Faden, Marie T. Nolan, Edwin Bodensiek & Jeremy Sugarman - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (12):1 – 8.
    Television medical dramas frequently depict the practice of medicine and bioethical issues in a strikingly realistic but sometimes inaccurate fashion. Because these shows depict medicine so vividly and are so relevant to the career interests of medical and nursing students, they may affect these students' beliefs, attitudes, and perceptions regarding the practice of medicine and bioethical issues. We conducted a web-based survey of medical and nursing students to determine the medical drama viewing habits and impressions of bioethical issues depicted in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  23.  6
    Book Review:A Dialogue on Moral Education. F. H. Matthews; The Teaching of Christ on Life and Conduct. Sophie Bryant. [REVIEW]Henry Sturt - 1899 - Ethics 9 (3):406-.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  35
    Situationism and the Problem of Moral Improvement.Matthew C. Taylor - 2019 - Philosophical Explorations 22 (3):312-327.
    A wealth of research in social psychology indicates that various ethically arbitrary situational factors exert a surprisingly powerful influence on moral conduct. Empirically-minded philosophers have argued over the last two decades that this evidence challenges Aristotelian virtue ethics. John Doris, Gilbert Harman, and Maria Merritt have argued that situationist moral psychology – as opposed to Aristotelian moral psychology – is better suited to the practical aim of helping agents act better. The Aristotelian account, with its emphasis on individual factors, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  41
    HIV Testing Autonomy: The Importance of Relationship Factors in HIV Testing to People in Lusaka and Chongwe, Zambia.Kasoka Kasoka & Matthew Weait - 2022 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 19 (2):239-254.
    In recent times, informed consent has been adopted worldwide as a cornerstone to ensure autonomy during HIV testing. However, there are still ongoing debates on whether the edifice on which informed consent requirements are grounded, that is, personal autonomy, is philosophically, morally, and practically sound, especially in countries where HIV is an epidemic and/or may have a different ontological perspective or lived reality. This study explores the views of participants from Zambia. In-depth and focus group discussions were conducted at various (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26.  14
    Ethical Considerations Related to Participation and Partnership: An Investigation of Stakeholders' Perceptions of an Action-Research Project on User Fee Removal for the Poorest in Burkina Faso.Matthew R. Hunt, Patrick Gogognon & Valéry Ridde - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):13.
    Healthcare user fees present an important barrier for accessing services for the poorest (indigents) in Burkina Faso and selective removal of fees has been incorporated in national healthcare planning. However, establishing fair, effective and sustainable mechanisms for the removal of user fees presents important challenges. A participatory action-research project was conducted in Ouargaye, Burkina Faso, to test mechanisms for identifying those who are indigents, and funding and implementing user fee removal. In this paper, we explore stakeholder perceptions of ethical considerations (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27.  10
    Non-Ideal Virtue and Situationism.Matthew C. Taylor - 2022 - The Journal of Ethics 26 (1):41-68.
    Several philosophers, known as situationists, have argued that evidence in social psychology threatens to undermine Aristotelian virtue ethics. An impressively large amount of empirical evidence suggests that most people do not consistently act virtuously and lack the ability to exercise rational control over their behavior. Since possessing moral virtues requires these features, situationists have argued that Aristotelianism does not accurately describe the character traits possessed by most people, and so the theory cannot lay claim to various theoretical advantages such as (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  75
    Genuine Problems and the Significance of Science.Matthew J. Brown - 2010 - Contemporary Pragmatism 7 (2):131-153.
    This paper addresses the political constraints on science through a pragmatist critique of Philip Kitcher’s account of “well-ordered science.” A central part of Kitcher’s account is his analysis of the significance of items of scientific research: contextual and purpose-relative scientific significance replaces mere truth as the aim of inquiry. I raise problems for Kitcher’s account and argue for an alternative, drawing on Peirce’s and Dewey’s theories of problem-solving inquiry. I conclude by suggesting some consequences for understanding the proper conduct (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  29.  22
    Bioethics in a Secular World: The Ethics and the Application.Matthew Tieu - 2012 - Bioethics Research Notes 24 (1):15.
    Tieu, Matthew As a contemporary academic discipline bioethics is a specialised though multidisciplinary field of study. It is the study of the ethical issues that arise from the biological and medical sciences, as well as clinical practice. It deals with important issues such as abortion, human embryonic stem cell research, euthanasia and reproductive technology, genetic modification, animal welfare, nanotechnology and neuroethics. The "Encyclopedia of Bioethics" defines bioethics as "the systematic study of the moral dimensions -including moral vision, decisions, (...) and policies -of the life sciences and health care, employing a variety of ethical methodologies in an interdisciplinary setting". Bioethics is a branch or sub-discipline of what is referred to as "applied ethics". As such, it also draws upon those disciplines that address the nature of ethics, i.e. philosophy, psychology and religion. Bioethics as an academic discipline therefore involves both the natural sciences and the humanities. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  26
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Medical and Nursing Students' Television Viewing Habits: Potential Implications for Bioethics”.Matthew Czarny, Ruth Faden, Marie Nolan, Edwin Bodensiek & Jeremy Sugarman - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (12):1-1.
    Television medical dramas frequently depict the practice of medicine and bioethical issues in a strikingly realistic but sometimes inaccurate fashion. Because these shows depict medicine so vividly and are so relevant to the career interests of medical and nursing students, they may affect these students' beliefs, attitudes, and perceptions regarding the practice of medicine and bioethical issues. We conducted a web-based survey of medical and nursing students to determine the medical drama viewing habits and impressions of bioethical issues depicted in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  31.  28
    Problems of Dirty Hands As a Species of Moral Conflicts.Matthew H. Kramer - 2018 - The Monist 101 (2):187-198.
    Every problem of dirty hands is a moral conflict in which a highly unpalatable course of conduct is chosen for the sake of fulfilling a stringent moral duty, and in which either the chosen course of conduct is evil or else it would have been evil in the absence of the exigent circumstances to which it is a response. To support this conception of problems of dirty hands, this paper endeavors to elucidate the nature of moral conflicts and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32.  24
    How It's Not the Chrisippus You Read: On Cooper, Hadot, Epictetus, and Stoicism as a Way of Life.Matthew Sharpe - 2014 - Philosophy Today 58 (3):367-392.
    This article challenges John M. Cooper’s reading of ancient Stoicism as a way of life, one which sets its back against Pierre Hadot’s notion that Stoicism could have philosophically advocated regimens of non-cognitive practices of the kind documented by Hadot. Part 1 examines Arrian’s Discourses, following A. A. Long in seeing in this text Arrian’s portrait of Epictetus as a philosophical persona: one bringing together the different virtues of Socrates, Diogenes, and Zeno. Part 2 then examines Epictetus’s Handbook , seeing (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  33.  16
    On a Neglected Argument in French Philosophy: Sceptical Humanism in Montaigne, Voltaire and Camus.Matthew Sharpe - 2015 - Critical Horizons 16 (1):1-26.
    This paper wants to draw out a common argument in three great philosophers and littérateurs in modern French thought: Michel de Montaigne, Voltaire, and Albert Camus. The argument makes metaphysical and theological scepticism the first premise for a universalistic political ethics, as per Voltaire's: “it is clearer still that we ought to be tolerant of one another, because we are all weak, inconsistent, liable to fickleness and error.” The argument, it seems to me, presents an interestingly overlooked, deeply important and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  34.  4
    The Elusive Benefits of Vagueness: Evidence From Experiments.Matthew James Green & Kees van Deemter - 2019 - In Richard Dietz (ed.), Vagueness and Rationality in Language Use and Cognition. Springer Verlag. pp. 63-86.
    Much of everyday language is vague, even in situations where vagueness could have been avoided. Yet the benefits of vagueness for hearers and readers are proving to be elusive. We discuss a range of earlier controlled experiments with human participants, and we report on a new series of experiments that we ourselves have conducted in recent years. These experiments, which focus on vague expressions that are part of referential noun phrases, aim to separate the utility of vagueness from the utility (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35.  96
    Implicit Theories of Intellectual Virtues and Vices: A Focus on Intellectual Humility.Peter L. Samuelson, Matthew J. Jarvinen, Thomas B. Paulus, Ian M. Church, Sam A. Hardy & Justin L. Barrett - 2014 - Journal of Positive Psychology 5 (10):389-406.
    The study of intellectual humility is still in its early stages and issues of definition and measurement are only now being explored. To inform and guide the process of defining and measuring this important intellectual virtue, we conducted a series of studies into the implicit theory – or ‘folk’ understanding – of an intellectually humble person, a wise person, and an intellectually arrogant person. In Study 1, 350 adults used a free-listing procedure to generate a list of descriptors, one for (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  36.  26
    Virtuous Soldiers: A Role for the Liberal Arts?Matthew Beard - 2014 - Journal of Military Ethics 13 (3):274-294.
    The modern soldier is faced with a complex moral and psychological landscape. As Nancy Sherman puts it in The Untold War: Inside the Hearts and Minds of our Soldiers, ‘soldiers go to war to fight external enemies… but most fight inner wars as well.’ The modern soldier is no longer simply a warrior: he is at once a peacekeeper, diplomat, leader, sibling and friend. In the face of such challenges, some responsible for the teaching of soldiers have endeavoured to incorporate (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37. Doing, Allowing, and Enabling Harm: An Empirical Investigation.Christian Barry, Matthew Lindauer & Gerhard Øverland - 2014 - In Joshua Knobe, Tania Lombrozo & Shaun Nichols (eds.), Oxford Studies in Experimental Philosophy, Volume 1. Oxford University Press.
    Traditionally, moral philosophers have distinguished between doing and allowing harm, and have normally proceeded as if this bipartite distinction can exhaustively characterize all cases of human conduct involving harm. By contrast, cognitive scientists and psychologists studying causal judgment have investigated the concept ‘enable’ as distinct from the concept ‘cause’ and other causal terms. Empirical work on ‘enable’ and its employment has generally not focused on cases where human agents enable harm. In this paper, we present new empirical evidence to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  38. Skepticism in Classical Indian Philosophy.Matthew R. Dasti - forthcoming - In Diego Machuca & Baron Reed (eds.), Skepticism from Antiquity to the Present.
    There are some tantalizing suggestions that Pyrrhonian skepticism has its roots in ancient India. Of them, the most important is Diogenes Laertius’s report that Pyrrho accompanied Alexander to India, where he was deeply impressed by the character of the “naked sophists” he encountered (DL IX 61). Influenced by these gymnosophists, Pyrrho is said to have adopted the practices of suspending judgment on matters of belief and cultivating an indifferent composure amid the vicissitudes of ordinary life. Such conduct, and the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. “I Am the Law!”—Perspectives of Legality.Matthew Zagor - unknown
    The language of morality and legality infuses every aspect of the Middle East conflict. From repeated assertions by officials that Israel has “the most moral army in the world” to justifications for specific military tactics and operations by reference to self-defense and proportionality, the public rhetoric is one of legal right and moral obligation. Less often heard are the voices of those on the ground whose daily experience is lived within the legal quagmire portrayed by their leaders in such uncompromising (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  12
    Why The Axioms and Theorems of Arithmetic Are Not Legal Norms.Matthew H. Kramer - 2007 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 27 (3):555-562.
    Ronald Dworkin has long criticized legal positivists for their efforts to distinguish between legal and non-legal standards of conduct that are incumbent on people. Recently, Dworkin has broached this criticism in his hostile account of the debates between Incorporationist Legal Positivists and Exclusive Legal Positivists. Specifically, he has maintained that Incorporationists cannot avoid the unpalatable conclusion that the axioms and theorems of arithmetic are legal norms. This article shows why such a conclusion is indeed avoidable and why Dworkin's criticism (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  41.  26
    Science, Worldviews and Education.Michael R. Matthews - 2014 - In International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. pp. 1585-1635.
    Science has always engaged with the worldviews of societies and cultures. The theme is of particular importance at the present time as many national and provincial education authorities are requiring that students learn about the nature of science (NOS) as well as learning science content knowledge and process skills. NOS topics are being written into national and provincial curricula. Such NOS matters give rise to at least the following questions about science, science teaching and worldviews: -/- What is a worldview? (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  42.  2
    Risky Disciplining: On Interdisciplinarity Between Sociology and Cognitive Neuroscience in the Governing of Morality.Matthew Wade - 2020 - European Journal of Social Theory 23 (1):72-92.
    The neuroscience of morality presents novel approaches in exploring the cognitive and affective underpinnings of moral conduct, and is steadily accumulating influence within discursive frames of biocitizenship. Many claims are infused with varieties of neuro-actuarialism in governing morally risky subjects, with implications that other fields should observe closely. Sociologists and other social scientists, however, have typically been reluctant to interject their expertise. However, a resurgent sociology of morality offers the means by which closer engagement may be realized. In encouraging (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Mass Media as a Discursive Resource and the Construction of Engineering Selves.Matthew J. Cousineau - 2015 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 35 (1-2):35-43.
    There have been different approaches to the study of the relations between mass media on the one hand and science and technological activities on the other. In this article, I summarize consumption approaches, point out some of their limitations, and then show how these limitations can be addressed by drawing on an ethnographic study I conducted of an academic engineering research laboratory. I analyze the discursive practices lab members use to interpret mass media. One practice treats media as reference points (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44. A Stakeholder Meeting Exploring the Ethical Perspectives of Immediately Sequential Bilateral Cataract Surgery.Matthew Quinn, Daniel Gray, Ahmed Shalaby Bardan, Mehran Zarei-Ghanavati, John Sparrow & Christopher Liu - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):44-44.
    Purpose The purported benefits and risks of immediately sequential bilateral cataract surgery have been well described, yet the procedure remains controversial among UK ophthalmologists. As many of the controversies of ISBCS are underpinned by ethical dilemmas, the aim of this work was to explore the ethical perspectives of ISBCS from a variety of stakeholder viewpoints. Method A semi-structured independent stakeholder meeting was convened at the Royal College of Ophthalmologists London headquarters in June 2018. In total, 29 stakeholders attended the meeting. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  32
    National Standards for Public Involvement in Research: Missing the Forest for the Trees.Matthew S. McCoy, Karin Rolanda Jongsma, Phoebe Friesen, Michael Dunn, Carolyn Plunkett Neuhaus, Leah Rand & Mark Sheehan - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (12):801-804.
    Biomedical research funding bodies across Europe and North America increasingly encourage—and, in some cases, require—investigators to involve members of the public in funded research. Yet there remains a striking lack of clarity about what ‘good’ or ‘successful’ public involvement looks like. In an effort to provide guidance to investigators and research organisations, representatives of several key research funding bodies in the UK recently came together to develop the National Standards for Public Involvement in Research. The Standards have critical implications for (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  46.  35
    Ethics Beyond Borders : How Canadian Health Professionals Experience Ethics in Humanitarian Assistance and Development Work.Matthew Hunt - unknown
    Canadian health professionals are involved in humanitarian assistance and development work in many regions of the world. They participate in primary health care, immunization campaigns, feeding programs, rehabilitation and hospital-based care. In the course of their work clinicians are frequently exposed to complex ethical issues. This thesis examines how health workers experience ethics in the course of humanitarian assistance and development work. A qualitative study was conducted to consider this question. Five core themes emerged from the data including experiencing a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. The Aim of Belief and the Goal of Truth: Reflections on Rosenberg.Matthew Chrisman - 2016 - In Pedro Schmechtig & Martin Grajner (eds.), Epistemic Reasons, Norms, and Goals. De Gruyter. pp. 357-382.
    This paper considers an argument from Rosenberg (Thinking about Knowing, 2002) that truth is not and cannot be the aim of belief. Here, I reconstruct what I take to be the most well worked out version of this idea tracing back to Rorty and Davidson. In response, I also distinguish two things the truth-aim could be: a goal regulating our executable epistemic conduct and an end which determines the types of evaluation, susceptibility to which is partially constitutive of what (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  8
    Better Regulation of Industry-Sponsored Clinical Trials Is Long Overdue.Matthew Wynia & David Boren - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (3):410-419.
    Regulating clinical trials for testing new drugs is fraught with risk. Misregulation can slow development of innovative and useful new drugs, but in other ways misregulation can foster trials that are inefficient and unethical, driven by commercial rather than scientific ends, and that can harm patients. In this paper, we argue not for more but for better regulation, based on the goal of rapidly producing innovative and safe products that represent significant advances in medical care. Data on industry-funded, late-stage clinical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  11
    Connecting Inquiry and Values in Science Education.Eun Ah Lee & Matthew J. Brown - 2018 - Science & Education 27 (1-2):63-79.
    Conducting scientific inquiry is expected to help students make informed decisions; however, how exactly it can help is rarely explained in science education standards. According to classroom studies, inquiry that students conduct in science classes seems to have little effect on their decision-making. Predetermined values play a large role in students’ decision-making, but students do not explore these values or evaluate whether they are appropriate to the particular issue they are deciding, and they often ignore relevant scientific information. We (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  50.  4
    Better Regulation of Industry-Sponsored Clinical Trials is Long Overdue.Matthew Wynia & David Boren - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (3):410-419.
    There is an old saw in health policy that everyone wants health care that is good, fast, and cheap — but it’s impossible to have more than two of these at one time.A similar bit of folk wisdom seems intuitively true for the development and testing of new pharmaceutical products. The public is in a bind. We want breakthrough drugs, and fast. But we also want these drugs to be affordable, thoroughly tested, safe, and effective. It seems we can’t have (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000