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Matthew Sharpe [97]Matthew Joel Sharpe [3]Matthew J. Sharpe [1]
  1.  22
    Camus, Philosophe: To Return to Our Beginnings.Matthew Sharpe - 2015 - Boston: Brill.
    In _Camus, Philosophe: To Return to our Beginnings_ Matthew Sharpe reads Camus as a _philosophe_ in the classical and enlightenment lineages, arguing that his defense of _mesure_ singles him out amidst 20th century French thought and makes him of renewed relevance today.
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  2.  14
    Zizek and Politics: A Critical Introduction.Matthew Sharpe & Geoff M. Boucher - 2010 - Edinburgh University Press.
    In Zizek and Politics, Geoff Boucher and Matthew Sharpe go beyond standard introductions to spell out a new approach to reading Zizek, one that can be highly critical as well as deeply appreciative. They show that Zizek has a raft of fundamental positions that enable his theoretical positions to be put to work on practical problems. Explaining these positions with clear examples, they outline why Zizek's confrontation with thinkers such as Derrida, Foucault and Deleuze has so radically changed how we (...)
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  3.  56
    On a Neglected Argument in French Philosophy: Sceptical Humanism in Montaigne, Voltaire and Camus.Matthew Sharpe - 2015 - Critical Horizons 16 (1):1-26.
    This paper wants to draw out a common argument in three great philosophers and littérateurs in modern French thought: Michel de Montaigne, Voltaire, and Albert Camus. The argument makes metaphysical and theological scepticism the first premise for a universalistic political ethics, as per Voltaire's: “it is clearer still that we ought to be tolerant of one another, because we are all weak, inconsistent, liable to fickleness and error.” The argument, it seems to me, presents an interestingly overlooked, deeply important and (...)
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  4.  45
    In the Crosshairs of the Fourfold: Critical Thoughts on Aleksandr Dugin’s Heidegger.Matthew Sharpe - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (2):167-187.
    In Part 1, we situate Dugin’s interpretation of Heidegger in relation to the better known, broadly left-liberal approaches to interpreting Heidegger’s thought, stressing Dugin’s unusual focus on the German thinker’s “middle” or Nazi-era texts, and showing how this periodizing optic affects Dugin’s culminating reading of Sein und Zeit and its key axiological notion of authenticity (Part 1). Part 2 examines Dugin’s appropriation of Heidegger’s radically pessimistic, trans-epochal critique of Western thought, centring around his striking reading of the esoteric notion of (...)
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  5.  45
    How It's Not the Chrisippus You Read: On Cooper, Hadot, Epictetus, and Stoicism as a Way of Life.Matthew Sharpe - 2014 - Philosophy Today 58 (3):367-392.
    This article challenges John M. Cooper’s reading of ancient Stoicism as a way of life, one which sets its back against Pierre Hadot’s notion that Stoicism could have philosophically advocated regimens of non-cognitive practices of the kind documented by Hadot. Part 1 examines Arrian’s Discourses, following A. A. Long in seeing in this text Arrian’s portrait of Epictetus as a philosophical persona: one bringing together the different virtues of Socrates, Diogenes, and Zeno. Part 2 then examines Epictetus’s Handbook , seeing (...)
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  6.  6
    Philosophy as a way of life: history, dimensions, directions.Matthew Sharpe - 2021 - New York: Bloomsbury Academic. Edited by Michael Ure.
    The idea of philosophy as a 'way of life' is not a new one. From the first recorded philosophy by Plato, there has been a tradition of thinking about philosophy as pointing us towards the good life, happiness and an ethical existence. But where does this notion that philosophy has anything to offer in terms of guiding us in how to live and live well come from? In this first ever introduction to philosophy as a way of life, Matthew Sharpe (...)
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  7.  48
    From Amy Allen to Abbé Raynal: Critical Theory, the Enlightenment and Colonialism.Matthew Sharpe - 2019 - Critical Horizons 20 (2):178-199.
    ABSTRACTThis paper is a critical response to Amy Allen’s The End of Progress: Decolonising the Normative Foundations of Critical Theory. We take up her book’s call for a “problematizing” history which challenges “taken-for-granted” preconceptions in order to contest Allen’s own representation of the thought of the enlightenment. Allen accepts that all the enlighteners agreed upon a stadial, progressive account of history, which she critiques epistemically and normatively. But we show in Part 2, drawing on the work of Henri Vyverberg and (...)
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  8. Stoic virtue ethics.Matthew Sharpe - 2014 - In S. van Hooft, N. Athanassoulis, J. Kawall, J. Oakley & L. van Zyl (eds.), The handbook of virtue ethics. Durham: Acumen Publishing.
  9.  41
    Socratic Ironies: Reading Hadot, Reading Kierkegaard.Matthew Sharpe - 2016 - Sophia 55 (3):409-435.
    This paper examines the seemingly unlikely rapport between the ‘Christian existentialist’, radically Protestant thinker, Søren Kierkegaard and French classicist and historian of philosophy, Pierre Hadot, famous for advocating a return to the ancient pagan sense of philosophy as a way of life. Despite decisive differences we stress in our concluding remarks, we argue that the conception of philosophy in Hadot as a way of life shares decisive features with Kierkegaard’s understanding of the true ‘religious’ life: as something demanding existential engagement (...)
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  10.  15
    “Bringin’ Sexy Back” (and With it, Women): Shusterman Beyond Foucault on the Greeks.Matthew Sharpe - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (4):138-146.
    Richard Shusterman, Ars Erotica: Sex and Somaesthetics in the Classical Arts of Love (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2021), 436 pages./ Like other contributors, I would like to begin by expressing my respect and admiration for the scale and scope of Richard Shusterman’s achievement in Ars Erotica. The Preface acknowledges “the vast amount of material” involved in this project of charting “the history of erotic theory in the world’s most influential premodern cultures,” with each chapter on a different cultural tradition potentially (...)
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  11.  43
    On Reading Heidegger—After the “Heidegger Case”?Matthew Sharpe - 2018 - Critical Horizons 19 (4):334-360.
    ABSTRACTThis paper looks at the state of the literature surrounding Heidegger and Nazism today. Part 1 focusses on Hassan Givsan’s remarkable work, Une histoire consternante: pourquoi les philosophes se laissent corrompre par le “cas Heidegger”, which looks at the different, mutually inconsistent forms of “apologetics” denying that Heidegger had been a Nazi, or that this commitment could have been shaped by his philosophy. Part 2 looks at five themes that emerge from the 2014 French-language collection Heidegger, le sol, la communauté, (...)
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  12.  23
    Pressing Questions for the Philosophical Life in a Time of Crisis.Matthew Sharpe, Eli Kramer & Michael Chase - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (2):1-6.
    Preview: 2020, the year the coronavirus pandemic spread globally, marked the twenty-fifth year since the publication of Pierre Hadot’s work Philosophy as a Way of Life. In that time, what began as the research specialization of just a few scholars has become a growing area of philosophical and metaphilosophical inquiry, bringing together researchers from around the globe. Hadot’s key ideas of spiritual exercises, and the very idea of PWL, have been applied to a host of individual thinkers from across the (...)
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  13.  49
    TOWARDS A PHENOMENOLOGY OF SAGESSE: uncovering the unique philosophical problematic of pierre hadot.Matthew Sharpe - 2018 - Angelaki 23 (2):125-138.
    This paper starts from the contention that Pierre Hadot’s unusually divided reception reflects the different dimensions of Hadot’s own scholarly profile. Hadot’s largely favourable reception amongst historians of ideas responds to the philological dimension of his work, but misses the implicit normativity involved in his recovery of the sense of ancient philosophy as a way of life. Analytic critics have registered but contested this normativity in ways that arguably also misrepresent his work. This paper contends that both receptions of Hadot (...)
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  14.  17
    Good reasons to philosophize: On Hadot, Cooper, and ancient philosophical protreptic.Matthew Sharpe - 2024 - Metaphilosophy 55 (2):231-248.
    This paper reassesses the Cooper-Hadot debate surrounding how students are converted to philosophy as a way of life (section 1) through engagement with philosophical protreptics. In section 2, the paper identifies the core “argument from finality” in philosophical protreptics seeking to convert non-philosophers to philosophy, starting from the universal human interest in securing eudaimonia. In line with Cooper, this argument seeks to persuade prospective students on rational grounds, so that their choice to philosophise would be rationally motivated. In section 3.1, (...)
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  15. The Invincible Summer: On Albert Camus' Philosophical Neoclassicism.Matthew Joel Sharpe - 2011 - Sophia 50 (4):577-592.
    What follows is a work of critical reconstruction of Camus' thought. It aims to answer to the wish Camus expressed in his later notebooks, that he at least be read closely. Specifically, I hope to do three things. In Part I, we will show how Camus' famous philosophy of the absurd represents a systematic scepticism whose closest philosophical predecessor is Descartes' method of doubt, and whose consequence, as in Descartes, is the discovery of a single, orienting certainty, on the basis (...)
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  16.  12
    Giving Marx’s Critique of Law a Fair Trial: On Igor Shoikhedbrod’s Revisiting of Marx’s Critique of Liberalism and the Rule of Law.Matthew King & Matthew Sharpe - 2024 - Critical Horizons 25 (2):168-181.
    This article presents a critical examination of Igor Soikhedbrod’s Revisiting Marx’s Critique of Liberalism: Rethinking Justice, Legality, and Rights. We argue that the book presents an important criticism of antinomian forms of critical theory, which underplay the extent to which Marx engaged in an imminent critique of liberal societies, including the rule of law, and upheld that progressive advances enshrined in this rule should be carried over or sublated in a communist dispensation.
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  17.  12
    Arendt, Heidegger, Eichmann, and Thinking, after the Black Notebooks.Matthew Sharpe - 2024 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 8 (1):120-133.
    Preview: /Review: Emmanuel Faye, Arendt et Heidegger: Extermination nazie et destruction de la pensée, (Albin Michel, 2016), 560 pages./ The appearance of Martin Heidegger’s Black Notebooks (1932-38) in 2014 has posed profound questions to philosophers and political theorists. For a long time, in ways that the Black Notebooks have definitively undermined, Heidegger’s National Socialism was widely considered as limited to 1933-34. His larger thought, at least after a proposed turning or kehre in the mid-1930s, was presented as insulated from, or (...)
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  18. Critique as technology of the self.Matthew Sharpe - 2005 - Foucault Studies 2:97-116.
    This inquiry is situated at the intersection of two enigmas. The first is the enigma of the status of Kant's practice of critique, which has been the subject of heated debate since shortly after the publication of the first edition of The Critique of Pure Reason. The second enigma is that of Foucault's apparent later 'turn' to Kant, and the label of 'critique', to describe his own theoretical practice. I argue that Kant's practice of 'critique' should be read, after Foucault, (...)
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  19.  53
    Traversing the Fantasy: Critical Responses to Slavoj Zizek.Geoff M. Boucher, Jason Glynos & Matthew Sharpe - unknown
    Slavoj Zizek is one of the most provocative and important thinkers writing in contemporary philosophy. This book is an engaged debate with Zizek. It contains a series of specially commissioned critical essays from an impressive collection of contributors covering the full extent of his oeuvre. Essays examine Zizek on cultural theory, film studies, ethics, political theory, social theory, Kant and Lacanian psychoanalysis. In the spirit of Zizek‘s own interventions, these essays critically interrogate his ideas, challenging him to respond directly which (...)
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  20.  51
    From Amy Allen to Abbé Raynal: Critical Theory, the Enlightenment and Colonialism.Matthew Sharpe - 2019 - Critical Horizons 20 (2):178-199.
    This paper is a critical response to Amy Allen’s The End of Progress: Decolonising the Normative Foundations of Critical Theory. We take up her book’s call for a “problematizing” history which challenges “taken-for-granted” preconceptions in order to contest Allen’s own representation of the thought of the enlightenment. Allen accepts that all the enlighteners agreed upon a stadial, progressive account of history, which she critiques epistemically and normatively (Part 1). But we show in Part 2, drawing on the work of Henri (...)
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  21.  37
    The descent of the doves: Camus’s Fall, Derrida’s ethics?Matthew Sharpe - 2002 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (2):173-189.
    This essay is a critique of Derrida's ethical works, using Camus's last novella The Fall as a critical sounding board. It argues that a danger pertains to any such highly self-reflexive position as Derrida's: a danger that Camus identified in The Fall, and staged in his character, Jean-Baptiste Clamence. Clamence is a successful Parisian lawyer, on top of his personal and professional life, whose equanimity is troubled after he is the unwitting passer-by as a young woman suicides one night on (...)
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  22. Wherewith to draw us to the left and right : on reading Heidegger in the new millennium.Matthew Sharpe - 2019 - In Gegory Fried (ed.), Confronting Heidegger: A Critical Dialogue on Politics and Philosophy. Lanham, Maryland, USA: Rowman & Littlefield International.
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  23.  7
    Of Israel, Forst & Voltaire: Deism, Toleration, and Radicalism.Matthew Sharpe - 2024 - Critical Horizons 25 (2):129-152.
    In the recent progressive reappraisals of the enlightenment by Jonathan Israel and Rainer Forst, Voltaire figures as almost a reactionary thinker, opposing the radical dimensions of the enlightenment pushing forwards secularisation, democratisation, and toleration. Part 1 examines Israel’s and Forst’s accounts of Voltaire, showing their striking proximity. Part 2 is divided into the three subheadings of (i) Voltaire’s deism, (ii) the pivotal subject of toleration, and (iii) the decisive question of what philosophical radicalism, in the direction of democratising reform, involves. (...)
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  24.  16
    Bibliopolitics: The History of Notation and the Birth of the Citational Academic Subject.Matthew Sharpe & Kirk Turner - 2018 - Foucault Studies 25:146.
    The paper builds upon a growing body of critical research on the proliferating use of bibliometrics as a means to evaluate academic research, but brings to it a specifically Foucauldian, genealogical approach. The paper has three parts. Part 1 situates bibliometrics as a new technology of neoliberal, biopolitical governmentality, alongside the host of other ‘metrics’ that have emerged in the last two decades. Part 2 analyses bibliometrics’ antecedents in prior notational practices in the Western heritage, highlighting how forms of noting (...)
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  25.  41
    100 years of European philosophy since the Great War: crisis and reconfigurations.Matthew Sharpe, Rory Jeffs & Jack Reynolds (eds.) - 2017 - Cham: Springer.
    This book is a collection of specifically commissioned articles on the key continental European philosophical movements since 1914. It shows how each of these bodies of thought has been shaped by their responses to the horrors set in train by World War I, and considers whether we are yet ‘post-post-war’. The outbreak of World War I in August 1914,set in chain a series of crises and re-configurations, which have continued to shape the world for a century: industrialized slaughter, the end (...)
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  26.  44
    Camus and the Virtues.Matthew Sharpe - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):679-708.
    Albert Camus can be meaningfully read as an agent-focussed virtue ethicist, as David Sherman has suggested. Yet moving far beyond Sherman’s version of this claim, we show here how Camus accepts what are four definitive parameters of the classical authors’ conception of the virtues—the last of which takes him beyond today’s recognised “virtue ethicists.” Firstly, he understands the virtues as lasting, beneficent dispositions to think, feel, and act in certain ways. Secondly, he conceives the virtues as mastering the untethered passions: (...)
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  27.  10
    Understanding Psychoanalysis.Matthew Sharpe & Joanne Faulkner - 2008 - Routledge.
    "Understanding Psychoanalysis" presents a broad introduction to the key concepts and developments in psychoanalysis and its impact on modern thought. Charting pivotal moments in the theorization and reception of psychoanalysis, the book provides a comprehensive account of the concerns and development of Freud's work, as well as his most prominent successors, Melanie Klein and Jacques Lacan.The work of these leading psychoanalytic theorists has greatly influenced thinking across other disciplines, notably feminism, film studies, poststructuralism, social and cultural theory, the philosophy of (...)
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  28.  54
    The plague and the Panopticon: Camus, with and against the total critiques of modernity.Matthew Sharpe - 2016 - Thesis Eleven 133 (1):59-79.
    Albert Camus’s 1947 novel La Peste and 1948 drama L’État de Siège, allegories of totalitarian power using the figure of the plague, remarkably anticipate Foucault’s celebrated genealogical analyses of modern power. Indeed, reading Foucault after Camus highlights a fact little-remarked in Discipline and Punish: namely, that the famous chapter on the ‘Panopticon’ begins by analysing the measures taken in early modern Vincennes following the advent of plague. Part III argues that, although Camus was cited as an inspiration by the nouveaux (...)
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  29.  4
    Resolving Hermotimus’ Paradox: Reading Lucian’s Hermotimus in Light of Plato’s Republic.Matthew Sharpe - 2024 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 18 (1):124-148.
    Lucian’s Hermotimus, despite its first appearances of being a merely skeptical, even sophistical discrediting of philosophy, is better read as a powerful protreptic defense of the endeavor, whose key ancient intertext is Plato's Republic. To make this case, the paper involves three parts. In part i, we examine the metaphilosophical framing of the Hermotimus’s exchange between the eponymous hero, aged about 60 (§48) and Lucian’s favored interlocutor, Lycinus. We show that Lucian accepts that philosophy is intended to be an elevated (...)
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  30.  40
    The Aesthetics of Ideology, or ‘The Critique of Ideological Judgment’ in Eagleton and Zizek.Matthew Sharpe - 2006 - Political Theory 34 (1):95-120.
    The notions of ‘ideology’ and ‘critique of ideology’ have been criticised in manyways. This essay examines theworks of two contemporary theorists who defend this theoretical category. Interestingly, both do this through pivotal recourse to categories drawn from modern aesthetic theory, and in particular Kant's third Critique. In thisway, they reanimate a theoretical concern with the intersection of politics and aesthetics that goes as far back as Plato. The essay's conclusion reflects on this “aesthetic turn” in the theory of ideology: what (...)
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  31.  7
    Purloined Letters—Lacan avec Strauss.Matthew J. Sharpe - 2021 - In Jeffrey Alan Bernstein & Jade Schiff (eds.), Leo Strauss and contemporary thought: reading Strauss outside the lines. Albany: State University of New York Press. pp. 29-50.
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  32.  43
    Autonomy, reflexivity, tragedy: Notions of democracy in Camus and Castoriadis.Matthew Sharpe - 2002 - Critical Horizons 3 (1):103-129.
    This paper looks at two 20th century theories of tragedy: those of Cornelius Castoriadis and Albert Camus. The theories that each proffer of this ancient cultural form are striking. Against more standard views, both theorists stress that tragedy is a cultural form that has only arisen historically in cultures whose forms of religious thought have been laid open to question. In this way, both argue that tragedy is an important democratic cultural form, which stages the confrontation between a no longer (...)
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  33.  14
    Do Universals have a Reference? On the Critical Theory of Herbert Marcuse.Matthew Sharpe - 2002 - Philosophy Today 46 (2):193-208.
  34.  19
    Georgics of the Mind and the Architecture of Fortune: Francis Bacon's Therapeutic Ethics.Matthew Sharpe - 2014 - Philosophical Papers 43 (1):89-121.
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  35. Jacques lacan.Matthew Sharpe - 2002 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  36.  34
    Unifying, Comparative, Critical and Metacritical: Domenico Losurdo’s Nietzsche as Aristocratic Rebel.Matthew Sharpe - 2022 - Critical Horizons 23 (3):284-304.
    ABSTRACT This review essay responds critically to the English translation of Domenico Losurdo’s monumental Friedrich Nietzsche: Aristocratic Rebel. It sets out to clearly identify and examine Losurdo’s two tasks in Nietzsche: firstly, his reconstruction of Nietzsche’s intellectual itinerary, from his earliest works until his descent into madness, in the context of later nineteenth-century social, political, philosophical, and eugenic sources; and secondly, to “interpret the interpretations”, and understand how Nietzsche’s avowed “aristocratic radicalism” could have informed thinkers from across the political spectrum, (...)
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  37. Camus' Askesis : reading Camus in light of the Carnets (and his L'Impromptu des philosophes).Matthew Sharpe - 2013 - Philosophical Practice 8 (1):1149-1164.
  38.  28
    Of Cartesianism and Spiritual Exercises.Matteo J. Stettler & Matthew Sharpe - 2022 - Philosophy Today 66 (3):471-489.
    This article challenges the recurrent critique that Pierre Hadot’s identification of ancient philosophy with the practice of spiritual exercises introduces a non- or irrational dimension into metaphilosophy. The occasion to do this is provided by Kerem Eksen’s recent reading of Descartes’s Meditations as consisting of solely intellectual, rather than spiritual, exercises—since the latter, Eksen claims, involve extrarational means and ends. Part 2 presents an alternative account of the role of cognition in the ancient meditatio at issue in understanding Descartes’s antecedents. (...)
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  39.  70
    Philosophy, Violence, Metaphor.Jack Reynolds, Leesa Davis & Matthew Sharpe - 2016 - Sophia 55 (1):1-4.
    In this paper, I explore the complex ethical dynamics of violence and nonviolence in Mahāyāna Buddhism by considering some of the historical precedents and scriptural prescriptions that inform modern and contemporary Buddhist acts of self-immolation. Through considering these scripturally sanctioned Mahāyāna ‘case studies,’ the paper traces the tension that exists in Buddhist thought between violence and nonviolence, outlines the interplay of key Mahāyāna ideas of transcendence and altruism, and comments on the mimetic status and influence of spiritually charged texts. It (...)
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  40.  14
    PWL for the Twenty-First Century Academic Philosopher.Matthew Sharpe - 2021 - American Association of Philosophy Teachers Studies in Pedagogy 6:9-33.
    In this essay, I sketch a third possibility between teaching PWL solely as history of philosophy (which seems to inescapably pull against its own conception of philosophizing), and the fascinating recent attempts by scholars to experiment with introducing modes of teaching and assessment which would reactivate ancient spiritual exercises within the modern university. This third way takes for granted that, for the foreseeable future (and if academic philosophy widely survives the twenty-first century’s recalibration of the university), it will do so (...)
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  41.  38
    Between too Intellectualist and not Intellectualist Enough: Hadot’s Spiritual Exercises and Annas’ Virtues as Skills.Matthew Sharpe - 2021 - Journal of Value Inquiry 55 (2):269-287.
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  42.  35
    Drafted into a Foreign War?: On the Very Idea of Ancient Philosophy as a Way of Life.Matthew Sharpe - 2021 - Rhizomata 8 (2):183-217.
    This paper examines the central criticisms that come, broadly, from the modern, ‘analytic’ tradition, of Pierre Hadot’s idea of ancient philosophy as a way of life.: Firstly, ancient philosophy just did not or could not have involved anything like the ‘spiritual practices’ or ‘technologies of the self’, aiming at curing subjects’ unnecessary desires or bettering their lives, contra Hadot and Foucault et al. Secondly, any such metaphilosophical account of putative ‘philosophy’ must unacceptably downplay the role of ‘serious philosophical reasoning’ or (...)
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  43.  55
    Restoring Camus as Philosophe: On Ronald Srigley’s Camus’ Critique of Modernity.Matthew Sharpe - 2012 - Critical Horizons 13 (3):400 - 424.
  44.  33
    Žižek, Slavoj.Matthew Sharpe & Australia - 2016 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Slavoj Žižek Slavoj Žižek is a Slovenian-born political philosopher and cultural critic. He was described by British literary theorist, Terry Eagleton, as the “most formidably brilliant” recent theorist to have emerged from Continental Europe. Žižek’s work is infamously idiosyncratic. It features striking dialectical reversals of received common sense; a ubiquitous sense of humor; … Continue reading Žižek, Slavoj →.
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  45.  21
    A disturbance of vision on the Capitol: Philosophy and the Far-Right – Towards an interdisciplinary inquiry.Matthew Sharpe - 2021 - Thesis Eleven 163 (1):5-28.
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  46.  28
    A Good Person for a Crisis? On the Wisdom of the Stoic Sage.Matthew Sharpe - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (1):32-49.
    Is the Stoic sage a possible or desirable ideal for contemporary men and women, as we enter into difficult times? Is he, as Seneca presents him, the very best person for a crisis? In order to examine these questions, Part 1 begins from what Irene Liu calls the “standard” modern conceptions of the sage as either a kind of epistemically perfect, omniscient agent, or else someone in possession of a specific arsenal of theoretical knowledge, especially concerning the physical world. We (...)
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  47.  36
    A just judgement? Considerations on Ronald Srigley’s Camus’ Critique of Modernity.Matthew Sharpe - 2014 - Thesis Eleven 120 (1):43-58.
    This paper responds critically to Ronald Srigley’s groundbreaking 2011 study Albert Camus’ Critique of Modernity. Srigley’s book reasserts Camus’ credentials as a deeply serious thinker, whose literary and philosophical oeuvre was dedicated to rethinking modernity on the basis of critical reassessments of the West’s entire premodern heritage. Yet we challenge whether Camus was ever, even in his final writings, so uncompromisingly anti-modern as Srigley contends. Srigley’s attempt to present Camus as committed to a return to the Greeks, on the basis (...)
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  48. Aesthetics: On Levinas’ Shadow.Matthew Sharpe - 2005 - Colloquy 9:29-46.
    Emmanuel Levinas’ aesthetics has been critically discussed much less than other components of his philosophy. In one way, this is not surprising, given Levinas’ wider post-war project. Nevertheless, in the late 1940s, the very time his influential later philosophy was taking shape, Levinas published a series of papers on literary criticism, and on the nature of art. istents and Existence, the text where Levinas first announces his project of “leaving the climate” of Heidegger’s thought, contains in its heart a remarkable (...)
     
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  49.  29
    A question of two truths? Remarks on parrhesia and the 'political-philosophical'difference.Matthew Sharpe - 2007 - Parrhesia 2:89-108.
  50.  21
    Brill's Companion to Camus: Camus among the Philosophers.Matthew Sharpe, Maciej Kałuża & Peter Francev (eds.) - 2020 - Boston: BRILL.
    This book is the first English-language collection of essays by leading Camus scholars around the world to focus on Albert Camus’ place and status as a philosopher amongst philosophers, engaging with leading Western thinkers, and considering themes of enduring interest.
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