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John O'Neill [152]John J. O'Neill [1]John F. O'Neill [1]
  1.  10
    Ecology, Policy and Politics: Human Well-Being and the Natural World.John O'Neill - 1993 - Environmental Values 4 (2):181-182.
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  2.  27
    Ecology, Policy, and Politics: Human Well-Being and the Natural World.John O'Neill - 1993 - Routledge.
    Revealing flaws in both 'green' and market-based approaches to environmental policy, O'Neill develops an Aristotolian account of well-being. He examines the implications for wider issues involving markets, civil society an.
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  3.  11
    The Market: Ethics, Knowledge, and Politics.John O'Neill - 1998 - Routledge.
    The author draws on considerable research in this area to provide an overdue critical evaluation of the limits of the market, and future prospects for non-market socialism.
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  4.  33
    The Stratification of Behaviour.John O'Neill - 1967 - Philosophy 42 (159):86-87.
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  5. Ecology, Policy and Politics: Human Well-Being and the Natural World.John O'Neill - 1993 - Routledge.
    Revealing flaws in both 'green' and market-based approaches to environmental policy, O'Neill develops an Aristotolian account of well-being. He examines the implications for wider issues involving markets, civil society an.
     
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  6. The rhetoric of deliberation: Some problems in Kantian theories of deliberative democracy.John O'Neill - 2002 - Res Publica 8 (3):249-268.
    Deliberative or discursive models of democracy have recently enjoyed a revival in both political theory and policy practice. Against the picture of democracy as a procedure for aggregating and effectively meeting the given preference of individuals, deliberative theory offers a model of democracy as a forum through which judgements and preferences are formed and altered through reasoned dialogue between free and equal citizens. Much in the recent revival of deliberative democracy, especially that which comes through Habermas and Rawls, has Kantian (...)
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  7.  27
    Without Finality.John O'Neill - 2008 - Environmental Values 17 (3):313-315.
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  8. Horkheimer and Neurath: Restarting a disrupted debate.John O'Neill & Thomas Uebel - 2004 - European Journal of Philosophy 12 (1):75–105.
  9.  52
    Representing people, representing nature, representing the world.John O'Neill - 2001 - .
    Problems of representation lie at the centre of recent experiments in deliberative democracy. The problems are not primarily social scientific questions concerning the statistical representiveness of small-scale deliberative institutions but normative questions about their political and ethical legitimacy. Experiments in deliberative democracy often rely for their representative legitimacy on appeals to the presence of members of different groups. However, they often do so without clear sources of authorisation and accountability from those represented. The representation of nonhumans and future generations in (...)
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  10.  47
    Hegel's Dialectic of Desire and Recognition: Texts and Commentary.John O'Neill (ed.) - 1996 - State University of New York Press.
    Presents three generations of German, French, and Anglo-American thinking on the Hegelian narrative of desire, recognition, and alienation in life, labor, and language.
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  11.  16
    Perception, expression, and history.John O'Neill - 1970 - Evanston,: Northwestern University Press.
    I / The Structures of Behavior MERLEAU-PONTY'S ANALYSIS of the structures of behavior proceeds by means of a critical confrontation of the realism of ...
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  12.  19
    Perception, Expression, and History: The Social Phenomenology of Maurice Merleau-Ponty.John O'Neill - 1970 - Evanston,: Northwestern University Press.
    In this commentary, John O'Neill concentrates upon three themes in the goal Merleau-Ponty set for himself, namely "to restore to things their concrete physiognomy, to organisms their individual ways of dealing with the world, and to subjectivity its inherence in history." O'Neill considers the three objectives in their original order: first, the study of animal and human psychology; then, the phenomenology of perception; and finally, certain extensions of these perspectives in the historical and social sciences.
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  13.  16
    The Communicative Body: Studies in Communicative Philosophy, Politics, and Sociology.John O'Neill - 1989 - Northwestern University Press.
    This collection of essays on communicative theory and praxis from the eminent Merleau-Ponty scholar and translator John O'Neill explores the thesis that the human body is the exemplary ground of all other communicative processes.
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  14.  38
    Meta‐Ethics.John O'Neill - 1991 - In Dale Jamieson (ed.), A Companion to Environmental Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 163–176.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Meta‐ethics and normative ethics Intrinsic value Is the rejection of meta‐ethical realism compatible with an environmental ethic? Objective value and the flourishing of living things Human sensibilities and environmental values Environmental ethics through thick and thin.
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  15.  51
    Future Generations: Present Harms.John O'neill - 1993 - Philosophy 68 (263):35 - 51.
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  16.  44
    Happiness and the Good Life.John O'Neill - 2008 - Environmental Values 17 (2):125-144.
    Holland argues that environmental deliberation should return to classical questions about the nature of the good life, understood as the worthwhile life. Holland's proposal contrasts with the revived hedonist conception of the good life which has been influential on environmentalism. The concept of the worthwhile life needs to be carefully distinguished from those of the happy life and the dutiful life. Holland's account of the worthwhile life captures the narrative dimension of human well-being which is revealed but inadequately addressed by (...)
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  17. Studies on Marx and Hegel.Jean Hyppolite, John O'neill, Alexandre Kojève, Allan Bloom & James H. Nichols - 1969 - Science and Society 34 (3):373-378.
     
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  18.  25
    Living with integrity.John O'Neill - 2024 - Environmental Values 33 (2):97-102.
  19.  22
    Future Generations: Present Harms.John O'Neill - 1993 - Philosophy 68 (263):35-51.
    There is a special problem with respect to our obligations to future generations which is that we can benefit or harm them but that they cannot benefit or harm us. Goodin summarizes the point well:No analysis of intergenerational justice that is cast even vaguely in terms of reciprocity can hope to succeed. The reason is the one which Addison… puts into the mouth of an Old Fellow of College, who when he was pressed by the Society to come into something (...)
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  20.  40
    Future Generations: Present Harms.John O'Neill - 1993 - Philosophy 68 (263):35-51.
    There is a special problem with respect to our obligations to future generations which is that we can benefit or harm them but that they cannot benefit or harm us. Goodin summarizes the point well:No analysis of intergenerational justice that is cast even vaguely in terms of reciprocity can hope to succeed. The reason is the one which Addison… puts into the mouth of an Old Fellow of College, who when he was pressed by the Society to come into something (...)
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  21.  34
    Formalism, Hamilton and Complex Numbers.John O'Neill - 1986 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 17 (3):351.
    The development and applicability of complex numbers is often cited in defence of the formalist philosophy of mathematics. This view is rejected through an examination of hamilton's development of the notion of complex numbers as ordered pairs of reals, And his later development of the quaternion theory, Which subsequently formed the basis of vector analysis. Formalism, By protecting informal assumptions from critical scrutiny, Constrained rather than encouraged the development of mathematics.
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  22. Knowledge, planning, and markets: A missing chapter in the socialist calculation debates.John O'neill - 2006 - Economics and Philosophy 22 (1):55-78.
    This paper examines the epistemological arguments about markets and planning that emerged in a series of unpublished exchanges between Hayek and Neurath. The exchanges reveal problems for standard accounts of both the socialist calculation debates and logical empiricism. They also raise questions concerning the sources of ignorance and uncertainty in modern economies, and the role of market and non-market organisations in the distribution and coordination of limited knowledge, which remain relevant to contemporary debates in economics. Hayek had argued that Neurath's (...)
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  23.  11
    Worlds without content: against formalism.John O'Neill - 1991 - London [England] ;: Routledge.
    For the Enlightenment, science represented an ideal of rational argument, behaviour and community against which could be judged the arbitrary power and authority of other spheres of human practice. This Enlightenment ideal runs through much liberal and socialist theory. However, the Enlightenment picture of science has appeared to many to be increasingly uncompelling. What explains the apparent decline of the Enlightenment vision? This book explores one neglected answer originally proposed by Husserl, that its decline is rooted in formalism, in the (...)
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  24. Hegel's Dialectic of Desire and Recognition: Texts and Commentary.John O'neill - 1998 - Science and Society 62 (2):317-319.
     
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  25.  90
    Wilderness, cultivation and appropriation.John O'Neill - 2002 - Philosophy and Geography 5 (1):35 – 50.
    "Nature" and "wilderness" are central normative categories of environmentalism. Appeal to those categories has been subject to two lines of criticism: from constructivists who deny there is something called "nature" to be defended; from the environmental justice movement who point to the role of appeals to "nature" and "wilderness" in the appropriation of land of socially marginal populations. While these arguments often come together they are independent. This paper develops the second line of argument by placing recent appeals to "wilderness" (...)
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  26. The specular body: Merleau-ponty and lacan on infant self and other.John O'Neill - 1986 - Synthese 66 (2):201 - 217.
  27.  9
    What Gives (with Derrida)?John O'Neill - 1999 - European Journal of Social Theory 2 (2):131-145.
    This article is a close reading of Jacques Derrida's critique of Marcel Mauss's classic, The Gift, and its revision through Charles Baudelaire's `The Counterfeit Coin'. Derrida's rejection of any exchange/reciprocity relation in the gift as an immoral binding of free subjects strangely accommodates the current ideological crisis of the gift in welfare societies. Moreover, Derrida's textual substitution of Baudelaire for Mauss repeats the counterfeit practice on which his own aporia of the gift is based.
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  28.  9
    The Poverty of Postmodernism.John O'Neill & hn O'Neill - 1995 - Psychology Press.
    An articulate and passionate argument against the postmodern/postraditionalist abandonment of Marxist and phenomenological concepts of reason and commonsense. This is a major and accessible contribution to the debate on postmodernity.
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  29. 'I gotta use words when I talk to you' : a response to Death and Furniture.John O'Neill - 1995 - History of the Human Sciences 8 (4):99-106.
  30.  16
    AIDS as a Globalizing Panic.John O'Neill - 1990 - Theory, Culture and Society 7 (2-3):329-342.
  31. Critique and remembrance.John O'Neill - 1976 - In On critical theory. New York: Seabury Press. pp. 1--11.
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  32.  26
    Managing without prices : the monetary valuation of biodiversity.John O'Neill - unknown
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  33. Democracy and the Claims of Nature: Critical Perspectives for a New Century.Wilson Carey McWilliams, Bob Pepperman Taylor, Bryan G. Norton, Robyn Eckersley, Joe Bowersox, J. Baird Callicott, Catriona Sandilands, John Barry, Andrew Light, Peter S. Wenz, Luis A. Vivanco, Tim Hayward, John O'Neill, Robert Paehlke, Timothy W. Luke, Robert Gottlieb & Charles T. Rubin (eds.) - 2002 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In Democracy and the Claims of Nature, the leading thinkers in the fields of environmental, political, and social theory come together to discuss the tensions and sympathies of democratic ideals and environmental values. The prominent contributors reflect upon where we stand in our understanding of the relationship between democracy and the claims of nature. Democracy and the Claims of Nature bridges the gap between the often competing ideals of the two fields, leading to a greater understanding of each for the (...)
     
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  34.  27
    Need, Humiliation and Independence.John O'Neill - 2005 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 57:73-98.
    The needs principle—that certain goods should be distributed according to need—has been central to much socialist and egalitarian thought. It is the principle which Marx famously takes to be that which is to govern the distribution of goods in the higher phase of communism. The principle is one that Marx himself took from the Blanquists. It had wider currency in the radical traditions of the nineteenth century. In the twentieth century it remained central to the mutualist form of socialism defended (...)
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  35.  48
    A preface to frame analysis.John O'Neill - 1979 - Human Studies 4 (1):359 - 364.
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  36.  1
    Markets, Ethics and Environment.John O'Neill - 2017 - In Stephen M. Gardiner & Allen Thompson (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Environmental Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Is there a relation between the increasing extension of markets and market norms to previously non-market goods, and the growth of environmental problems? This chapter explores two competing answers: market-endorsing positions that argue that a source of environmental problems lies in the absence of markets in environmental goods and that the extension of markets or market modes of valuation to environmental goods offers the most effective way of protecting them; market-skeptical positions that deny that the extension of markets will protect (...)
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  37.  24
    Otto Neurath’s Economics in Context.Elisabeth Nemeth, Stefan W. Schmitz, Thomas E. Uebel, Günther Chaloupek, John F. O'Neill, John F. O'neill & Peter Mooslechner - 2008 - Springer Verlag.
    Otto Neurath (1882-1945) was a highly unorthodox thinker both in philosophy and economics. The contributions to this sparkling new book conclude that Neurath touched on many of the most critical problems of economic theory during its formative years as a modern discipline. His economics provide insights into the foundational problems of modern economics and should encourage contemporary economic theorists to critically reflect their own hidden presumptions.
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  38.  12
    Exploitation and Workers’Co‐operatives: a reply to Alan Carter.John O'neill - 2008 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 8 (2):231-235.
    ABSTRACT In a recent paper Alan Carter argues that the claim that workers’co‐operatives merely replace exploitation by employers with ‘self‐exploitation’is nonsense: the term ‘self‐exploitation’is self‐contradictory. He maintains that the only form of exploitation to which a workers’co‐operative may be said to be subject is ‘market‐exploitation’by dominant economic actors who are external to the co‐operative. I argue that these conclusions are mistaken. While the concept of ‘market‐exploitation’is not without value, it is difficult to operationalise. While the concept of ‘self‐exploitation’is, understood literally, (...)
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  39.  45
    Tainted Cash?Dale Jamieson, Alan Carter, David Papineau & John O'Neill - 1998 - The Philosophers' Magazine 3 (3):26-27.
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  40.  17
    Tainted Cash?Dale Jamieson, Alan Carter, David Papineau & John O'Neill - 1998 - The Philosophers' Magazine 3:26-27.
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  41.  22
    Merleau-Ponty: The Role of the Body-Subject in Interpersonal Relations.John O'Neill - 1966 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 27 (4):625-626.
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  42.  83
    Participatory Planning through Negotiated Coordination.Pat Devine, David Laibman & John O'Neill - 2002 - Science and Society 66 (1):72 - 93.
  43.  24
    Should Communitarians be Nationalists?John O'neill - 1994 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 11 (2):135-143.
    ABSTRACT It is widely supposed by both its proponents and critics that communitarianism is committed to the defence of lies of nationhood: the nation forms a surviving communal attachment in a world in which the individual is otherwise denuded of ties of community. I argue in this paper that this assumption is mistaken. It depends on a romantic image of the nation which was constructed in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. That image hides the recent historical origins of the nation (...)
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  44.  27
    Science, Wonder and the Lust of the Eyes.John O'neill - 1993 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 10 (2):139-146.
    ABSTRACT Is a scientific attitude to the natural world an obstacle to an appreciation of its value? This paper argues that it is not. Following Aristotle and Marx, it maintains that, properly pursued, science has value because it enables us to contemplate that which is wonderful and beautiful. However, the paper concedes that, as actually practised, science can foster a vice described by Augustine as ‘the lust of the eyes’: knowledge is sought not to open us to the world, but (...)
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  45. A Preface to Frame Analysis.John O'neill - 1981 - Human Studies 4 (4):359-364.
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  46.  33
    A realist model of knowledge: With a phenomenological deconstruction of its model of man.John O'Neill - 1986 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 16 (1):1-19.
  47.  18
    Can phenomenology be critical?John O'Neill - 1972 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 2 (1):1-13.
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  48.  68
    Ecological economics and the politics of knowledge : the debate between Hayek and Neurath.John O'Neill - 2004 - .
    Hayek's epistemic arguments against planning were aimed not just against socialism but also the tradition of ecological economics. The concern with the physical preconditions of economic activity and defence of non-monetary measures in economic choice were expressions of the same rationalist illusion about the scope of human knowledge that underpinned the socialist project. Neurath's commitment to physicalism, in natura calculation and planning typified these errors. Neurath responded to these criticisms in unpublished notes and correspondence with Hayek. These highlighted the epistemological (...)
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  49. Journalism in the market place.John O'Neill - 1992 - In Andrew Belsey & Ruth F. Chadwick (eds.), Ethical issues in journalism and the media. New York: Routledge. pp. 15--32.
     
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  50.  13
    Marxism and the Two Sciences.John O'Neill - 1981 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 11 (3):281-302.
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