Results for 'Environmental sciences'

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  1. Www. Nmw. ac. uk/change2001.Uk Environmental Change Network - 2001 - Science and Society 17:20.
     
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  2.  2
    The Phenomenon of Life.Christopher Alexander & Center for Environmental Structure - 2002
    Contemporary architecture is increasingly grounded in science and mathematics. Architectural discourse has shifted radically from the sometimes disorienting Derridean deconstruction, to engaging scientific terms such as fractals, chaos, complexity, nonlinearity, and evolving systems. That's where the architectural action is -- at least for cutting-edge architects and thinkers -- and every practicing architect and student needs to become conversant with these terms and know what they mean. Unfortunately, the vast majority of architecture faculty are unprepared to explain them to students, not (...)
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  3.  6
    Tempos in Science and Nature: Structures, Relations, and Complexity.C. Rossi & New York Academy of Sciences - 1999
    This text addresses the problems of complex systems in understanding natural phenomena and the behaviour of systems related to human activity, from a science and humanities perspective. It discusses molecular behaviour and structures, and offers examples of ecological and environmental modelling.
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  4.  14
    Democracy's Value.Sterling Professor of Political Science and Henry R. Luce Director of the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies Ian Shapiro, Ian Shapiro, Casiano Hacker-Cordón & Russell Hardin (eds.) - 1999 - Cambridge University Press.
    Democracy has been a flawed hegemony since the fall of communism. Its flexibility, its commitment to equality of representation, and its recognition of the legitimacy of opposition politics are all positive features for political institutions. But democracy has many deficiencies: it is all too easily held hostage by powerful interests; it often fails to advance social justice; and it does not cope well with a number of features of the political landscape, such as political identities, boundary disputes, and environmental (...)
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  5. Does environmental science crowd out non-epistemic values?Kinley Gillette, Stephen Andrew Inkpen & C. Tyler DesRoches - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 87 (C):81-92.
  6.  7
    Communicating environmental science beyond academia: Stylistic patterns of newsworthiness in popular science journalism.Katarzyna Molek-Kozakowska - 2017 - Discourse and Communication 11 (1):69-88.
    Science communication in online media is a discursive domain where science-related content is often expressed through styles characteristic of popular journalism. This article aims to characterize some dominant stylistic patterns in magazine articles devoted to environmental issues by identifying the devices used to enhance newsworthiness, given the fact that for some readers environmental topics may no longer seem engaging. The analytic perspective is an adaptation of the newsworthiness framework that has been applied in news discourse studies. The material (...)
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  7.  4
    Environmental Science and Technology.Mary Tiles - 2009 - In Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, Stig Andur Pedersen & Vincent F. Hendricks (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Technology. Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 280–284.
    This chapter contains sections titled: References and Further Reading.
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  8.  3
    Comparing Environmental Science Literacy Among Education Majors and a National Sample.Mike Robinson - 1998 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 18 (4):240-246.
    The responses of a convenience sample of 83 secondary preservice and preeducation students in three university classes were compared to each other and to a national sample of 1,492 adults on a national poll of science knowledge. The results of the data analyses using simple ANOVA and two-tailed t tests indicated that preservice secondary science teachers in a secondary science methods class are significantly more science literate than preeducation majors and the na tional sample. They were not significantly more science (...)
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  9.  7
    Perceiving Environmental Science, Risk and Industry Regulation in the Mediatised Vicious Cycles of the Tasmanian Salmon Aquaculture Industry.Coco Cullen-Knox, Aysha Fleming, Libby Lester & Emily Ogier - 2021 - Social Epistemology 35 (5):441-460.
    This paper examines public conflict over the rapid growth of the Tasmanian salmon aquaculture industry and associated environmental and social impacts. By conducting a media analysis, triangulated...
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  10. Environmental science input to public policy.Paul R. Ehrlich - 2006 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 73 (3):915-948.
    This paper details many ways in which this input has been inadequate, especially during the Bush administration. It also recounts examples of successful use of scientific inputs, and discussed the reasons for both successes and failures. Then it proposes ways to accomplish the critical task of seeing to it that science is properly considered in the policy process.
     
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  11. Environmental science and technology.J. C. Bare & T. P. Gloria - 2006 - Critical Review (University of Melbourne) 40 (4):1104-1113.
  12. Environmental Science and Public Policy.Steven F. Hayward - 2006 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 73 (3):891-914.
    The article discusses the uncertainty in climate science and the problem this poses for policymakers confronting mitigation policy costs in the U.S. The reasons legitimate scientific uncertainty becomes magnified in the political arena are highlighted. This uncertainty results from the rapid pace of published research, as demonstrated by the paleoclimatology studies in "Nature" and the July 2005 issue of "Science." The author states that the California Air Resources Board seems to refuse to undertake an open reconsideration of the policy implications (...)
     
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  13.  21
    Enhancing Argumentative Skills in Environmental Science Education.Christoph Baumberger, Deborah Mühlebach & Gertrude Hirsch Hadorn - 2015 - GAIA 24 (3):206-208.
    Dealing with complex problems often requires argumentative skills that go beyond the natural abilities even of gifted students and lecturers. We sketch how to reconstruct and evaluate arguments and outline how the fostering of argumentative skills is integrated into the curriculum in Environmental Sciences at the Department of Environmental Systems Sciences of ETH Zurich.
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  14.  50
    What does interdisciplinarity look like in practice: Mapping interdisciplinarity and its limits in the environmental sciences.Miles MacLeod & Michiru Nagatsu - 2018 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 67:74-84.
    In this paper we take a close look at current interdisciplinary modeling practices in the environmental sciences, and suggest that closer attention needs to be paid to the nature of scientific practices when investigating and planning interdisciplinarity. While interdisciplinarity is often portrayed as a medium of novel and transformative methodological work, current modeling strategies in the environmental sciences are conservative, avoiding methodological conflict, while confining interdisciplinary interactions to a relatively small set of pre-existing modeling frameworks and (...)
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  15. Philosophy of the environmental sciences.Jay Odenbaugh - 2010 - In P. D. Magnus & Jacob Busch (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Science. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 155--171.
    In this essay, I consider three philosophical issues that arise in the environmental sciences. First, these sciences depend on mathematical models and simulations which are highly idealized and are coupled with very uncertain data. Why should we trust these models and simulations? Second, in standard hypothesis testing, the burden of proof is in favor of the null hypothesis which claims some causal factor has no effect. The alternative hypothesis is accepted only when the likelihood of the null (...)
     
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  16.  17
    On the Connection Between Environmental Science and Environmental Ethics.Tom Regan - 1980 - Environmental Ethics 2 (4):363-367.
    I critically assess Don Marietta’s thesis that obligations are not dictates of reason but rather are imbedded in a person’s “world view.” The notion of “a view of the world” is both vague and leads to consequences common to all forms of subjectivism in ethics, since world views can and sometimes do vary from person to person. Marietta cannot avoid these consequences by arguing that some views of the world are “more reasonable” than others, since counting rationality as an appropriate (...)
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  17.  7
    On the Connection Between Environmental Science and Environmental Ethics.Tom Regan - 1980 - Environmental Ethics 2 (4):363-367.
    I critically assess Don Marietta’s thesis that obligations are not dictates of reason but rather are imbedded in a person’s “world view.” The notion of “a view of the world” is both vague and leads to consequences common to all forms of subjectivism in ethics, since world views can and sometimes do vary from person to person. Marietta cannot avoid these consequences by arguing that some views of the world are “more reasonable” than others, since counting rationality as an appropriate (...)
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  18.  6
    Environmental Science in Japan. [REVIEW]Morris Low - 2005 - Minerva 43 (4):441-444.
  19. Methods in Environmental Science.Karl Zimmerer - 2015 - In Thomas Albert Perreault, Gavin Bridge & James McCarthy (eds.), The Routledge handbook of political ecology. New York, NY: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
     
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  20.  19
    Allaby, Michael, basics of environmental science.Peter G. Kevan - 1997 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 10 (2):199-200.
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  21.  7
    Review of Defending Biodiversity: Environmental Science and Ethics (2017), Cambridge University Press.Alkistis Elliott-Graves - 2018 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  22. Philosophy of the environmental sciences.Jay Odenbaugh - 2009 - In P. D. Magnus & Jacob Busch (eds.), New waves in philosophy of science. Palgrave-Macmillan.
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  23.  4
    Computer Applications in Teaching Environmental Science.Robert Novak - 1990 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 10 (4):228-232.
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  24.  46
    Technology and the possibility of global environmental science.Mary Tiles - 2009 - Synthese 168 (3):433 - 452.
    Global environmental science, in its current configuration as predominantly interdisciplinary earth systems analysis, owes its existence to technological development in three respects. (1) Environmental impacts of globalization of corporate and military industrial development linked to widespread use of new technologies prompted investigation of ways to understand and anticipate the global nature of such impacts. (2) Extension of the reach of technology itself demands extension of attempts to anticipate and control the environment in which the technology is to function. (...)
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  25.  29
    Preludes to a reconstructive “environmental science”.Mathias Gutmann & Michael Weingarten - 2004 - Poiesis and Praxis 3 (s 1-2):37-61.
    Biodiversity is a term easily applied in different and differing contexts. At first glance it seems to be a biological concept, defined and used in the realm of biological theory, serving for the description of particular aspects of the human and non-human environment. In this sense biodiversity even found its way into the texts of international conventions: “Biological diversity means the variability among living organisms from all sources including, inter alia, terrestrial, marine and other aquatic systems and the ecological complexes (...)
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  26.  11
    Re-disciplining Academic Careers? Interdisciplinary Practice and Career Development in a Swedish Environmental Sciences Research Center.Ruth Müller & Wolfgang Kaltenbrunner - 2019 - Minerva 57 (4):479-499.
    Interdisciplinarity is often framed as crucial for addressing the complex problems of contemporary society and for achieving new levels of innovation. But while science policy and institutions have provided a variety of incentives for stimulating interdisciplinary work throughout Europe, there is also growing evidence that some aspects of the academic system do not necessarily reward interdisciplinary work. In this study, we explore how mid-career researchers in an environmental science research center in Sweden relate to and handle the distinct forms (...)
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  27.  15
    “Hungry for Knowledge”: Towards a Meso‐History of the Environmental Sciences.Nils Güttler - 2019 - Berichte Zur Wissenschaftsgeschichte 42 (2-3):235-258.
    Berichte zur Wissenschaftsgeschichte, EarlyView.
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  28.  12
    Improving philosophical dialogue interventions to better resolve problematic value pluralism in collaborative environmental science.Bethany K. Laursen, Chad Gonnerman & Stephen J. Crowley - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 87:54-71.
    Environmental problems often outstrip the abilities of any single scientist to understand, much less address them. As a result, collaborations within, across, and beyond the environmental sciences are an increasingly important part of the environmental science landscape. Here, we explore an insufficiently recognized and particularly challenging barrier to collaborative environmental science: value pluralism, the presence of non-trivial differences in the values that collaborators bring to bear on project decisions. We argue that resolving the obstacles posed (...)
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  29.  24
    Coupled Ethical-Epistemic Analysis as a Tool for Environmental Science.Sean A. Valles, Michael O’Rourke & Zachary Piso - 2019 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 22 (3):267-286.
    This paper presents a new model for how to jointly analyze the ethical and evidentiary dimensions of environmental science cases, with an eye toward making science more participatory and publically...
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  30.  82
    The ethical significance of language in the environmental sciences: Case studies from pollution research.Kevin C. Elliott - 2009 - Ethics, Place and Environment 12 (2):157 – 173.
    This paper examines how ethically significant assumptions and values are embedded not only in environmental policies but also in the language of the environmental sciences. It shows, based on three case studies associated with contemporary pollution research, how the choice of scientific categories and terms can have at least four ethically significant effects: influencing the future course of scientific research; altering public awareness or attention to environmental phenomena; affecting the attitudes or behavior of key decision makers; (...)
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  31.  27
    The Need for Social Ethics in Interdisciplinary Environmental Science Graduate Programs: Results from a Nation-Wide Survey in the United States.Sean Valles, Kyle Whyte, Zach Piso, Michael O’Rourke, Jesse Engebretson & Troy E. Hall - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (2):565-588.
    Professionals in environmental fields engage with complex problems that involve stakeholders with different values, different forms of knowledge, and contentious decisions. There is increasing recognition of the need to train graduate students in interdisciplinary environmental science programs in these issues, which we refer to as “social ethics.” A literature review revealed topics and skills that should be included in such training, as well as potential challenges and barriers. From this review, we developed an online survey, which we administered (...)
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  32.  27
    Eco-media: art informed by developments in ecology, media technology and environmental science.Andrea Polli - 2007 - Technoetic Arts 5 (3):187-200.
    In the twenty-first century, there has been a resurgence of ecologically conscious art among artists using new technologies. Like Eco-art, this recent movement, which might be called Eco-media, is interdisciplinary. Eco-media is heavily influenced by developments in environmental science, in particular developments in remote imaging and other kinds of remote Earth sensing (for example, the widespread use of satellite imaging and GPS) and developments in computer modelling (for example, detailed global models of climate that not only model the physics (...)
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  33.  11
    Scientizing the ‘environment’: Solly Zuckerman and the idea of the School of Environmental Sciences.Elliot Honeybun-Arnolda - forthcoming - British Journal for the History of Science:1-14.
    In 1960 Sir Solly Zuckerman proposed the idea of an interdisciplinary department of ‘environmental sciences’ (ENV) for the newly established University of East Anglia (UEA). Prior to this point, the concept of ‘environmental sciences’ was little known: since then, departments and degree courses have rapidly proliferated through universities and colleges around the globe. This paper draws on archival research to explore the conditions and contexts that led to the proposal of a new and interdisciplinary grouping of (...)
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  34.  8
    If Post-Normal Science is the Solution, What is the Problem?: The Politics of Activist Environmental Science.Rob Hoppe & Anna Wesselink - 2011 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 36 (3):389-412.
    Post-normal science is presented by its proponents as a new way of doing science that deals with uncertainties, value diversity or antagonism, and high decision stakes and urgency, with the ultimate goal of remedying the pathologies of the global industrial system for which, according to Funtowicz and Ravetz, existing science forms the basis. The authors critically examine whether PNS can fulfill this claim in the light of empirical and theoretical work on politics and policy making. The authors credit PNS as (...)
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  35.  8
    On diversity of human-nature relationships in environmental sciences and its implications for the management of ecological crisis.L. Mouysset - 2023 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 45 (2):1-20.
    Decision makers addressing the ecological crisis face the challenge of considering complex ecosystems in their socioeconomic decisions. Complementary to ecological sciences, other scientific frameworks, grouped under the umbrella term environmental sciences, offer decision makers the opportunity to pursue sustainable paths. Because the environmental sciences are drawn from different branches of science, environmental ethics must go beyond the legacy of ecology and the life sciences to describe the contribution of scientific knowledge to addressing the (...)
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  36.  21
    The Need for Social Ethics in Interdisciplinary Environmental Science Graduate Programs: Results from a Nation-Wide Survey in the United States.Troy E. Hall, Jesse Engebretson, Michael O’Rourke, Zach Piso, Kyle Whyte & Sean Valles - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (2):565-588.
    Professionals in environmental fields engage with complex problems that involve stakeholders with different values, different forms of knowledge, and contentious decisions. There is increasing recognition of the need to train graduate students in interdisciplinary environmental science programs in these issues, which we refer to as “social ethics.” A literature review revealed topics and skills that should be included in such training, as well as potential challenges and barriers. From this review, we developed an online survey, which we administered (...)
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  37.  6
    The Norton History of the Environmental Sciences.Peter J. Bowler - 1993 - W. W. Norton.
    Chronicles humanity's long quest to understand its own origins and the connectedness of all life on Earth.
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  38.  7
    Adaptive Epistemologies: Conceptualizing Adaptation to Climate Change in Environmental Science.Jerrold Long & Shana Lee Hirsch - 2021 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 46 (2):298-319.
    This article explores how scientists adapt to a changing climate. To do this, we bring examples from a case study of salmon habitat restorationists in the Columbia River Basin into conversation with concepts from previous work on change and stability in knowledge infrastructures and scientific practice. In order to adapt, ecological restorationists are increasingly relying on predictive modeling tools, as well as initiating broader changes in the interdisciplinary nature of the field of ecological restoration itself. We explore how the field (...)
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  39.  3
    General Theory of Modal Fields and Modal Explanations in Human and Environmental Sciences.Kari Väyrynen - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 26:89-94.
    The idea of ‘modal fields’ is inspired by regional and pluralistic ontologies, which were sketched and developed by Hegel, Husserl and especially Nicolai Hartmann. It suggests that the world is structured by spheres which are not reducible to each other, and that modal fields denote the scope of real possibilities inside the spheres. It is, for example, possible to distinguish between physical, biological, ecological, economic and technological possibilities/modal fields. It is also possible to define, for the purpose of scientific research, (...)
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  40.  4
    Allaby, Michael, Basics of Environmental Science. [REVIEW]Peter G. Kevan - 1997 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 10 (2):199-200.
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  41.  33
    Defending Biodiversity: Environmental Science and Ethics Jonathan A.Newman, Gary Varner and Stefan Linquist, 2017 Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, xiv + 441 p.; £36.99. [REVIEW]Daniel P. Faith - 2019 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 36 (4):688-690.
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  42.  17
    Argumentation schemes: From genetics to international relations to environmental science policy to AI ethics.Nancy L. Green - 2021 - Argument and Computation 12 (3):397-416.
    Argumentation schemes have played a key role in our research projects on computational models of natural argument over the last decade. The catalogue of schemes in Walton, Reed and Macagno’s 2008 book, Argumentation Schemes, served as our starting point for analysis of the naturally occurring arguments in written text, i.e., text in different genres having different types of author, audience, and subject domain, for different argument goals, and for different possible future applications. We would often first attempt to analyze the (...)
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  43. Rumblings from an Upland(the Pantabangan Experience). Paper presented a the Seminar-Workshop on the _ocio-Economic and Institutional Aspects of Upland Development sponsored by the Program for Environmental Science and anagement_ UP at Los Bafios, College.Go de la Costa Ymzon - forthcoming - Laguna.
     
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  44.  64
    Deep Ecology from the Perspective of Environmental Science.Frank B. Golley - 1987 - Environmental Ethics 9 (1):45-55.
    Deep ecology is examined from the perspective of scientific ecology. Two norms, self-realization and biocentric equality, are considered central to deep ecology, and are explored in brief. Concepts of scientific ecology that seem to form a bridge to these norms are ecological hierarchical organization, the exchange of energy, material and information, and the development of species within ecosystems and the biosphere. While semantic problems exist, conceptually it appears that deep ecology norms can be interpreted through scientific ecology.
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  45.  13
    Deep Ecology from the Perspective of Environmental Science.Frank B. Golley - 1987 - Environmental Ethics 9 (1):45-55.
    Deep ecology is examined from the perspective of scientific ecology. Two norms, self-realization and biocentric equality, are considered central to deep ecology, and are explored in brief. Concepts of scientific ecology that seem to form a bridge to these norms are ecological hierarchical organization, the exchange of energy, material and information, and the development of species within ecosystems and the biosphere. While semantic problems exist, conceptually it appears that deep ecology norms can be interpreted through scientific ecology.
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  46.  6
    Images of the Earth: Essays in the History of the Environmental Sciences.L. J. Jordanova & Roy Porter - 1997
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  47.  78
    Climate change as news: challenges in communicating environmental science.Andrew C. Revkin - 2007 - In Joseph F. DiMento & Pamela Doughman (eds.), Climate Change: What It Means for Us, Our Children, and Our Grandchildren. MIT Press. pp. 139--60.
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  48.  16
    Commentary on Jonathan A. Newman, Gary Varner, and Stefan Linquist: Defending Biodiversity: Environmental Science and Ethics, chapter 11: should biodiversity be conserved for its aesthetic value?Jennifer Welchman - 2020 - Biology and Philosophy 35 (1):13.
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  49. Fish-farming and the precautionary principle: Context and values in environmental science for policy. [REVIEW]Matthias Kaiser - 1997 - Foundations of Science 2 (2):307-341.
    The paper starts with the assumption that the Precautionary Principle (PP) is one of the most important elements of the concept of sustainability. It is noted that PP has entered international treaties and national law. PP is widely referred to as a central principle of environmental policy. However, the precise content of PP remains largely unclear. In particular it seems unclear how PP relates to science. In section 2 of the paper a general overview of some historical and systematic (...)
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  50.  15
    Erratum to: The Need for Social Ethics in Interdisciplinary Environmental Science Graduate Programs: Results from a Nation-Wide Survey in the United States.Troy E. Hall, Jesse Engebretson, Michael O’Rourke, Zach Piso, Kyle Whyte & Sean Valles - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (2):589-589.
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