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  1. Disentangling human nature: Anthropological reflections on evolution, zoonoses and ethnographic investigations.Luis Gregorio Abad Espinoza - manuscript
    Human nature is a puzzling matter that must be analysed through a holistic lens. In this commentary, I foray into anthropology's biosocial dimensions to underscore that human relations span from microorganisms to global commodities. I argue that the future of social-cultural anthropology depends on the integration of evolutionary theory for its advancement. Ultimately, since the likelihood of novel zoonoses' emergence, digital ethnography could offer remarkable opportunities for ethical and responsible inquiries.
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  2. Why ecosystems need not be social constructed (though their health may be).Jay Odenbaugh - manuscript
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  3. Employability ecosystems in music: (Re)navigating a life in music.Karen Burland, Liz Mellor & Christine Bates - forthcoming - Employability Ecosystems in Music: Navigating a Life in Music.
    Arts and Humanities in Higher Education, Ahead of Print. Preparing students to navigate a life in music involves understanding how they develop awareness of their personal and professional identities, build networks, and reflect on practice in order to sustain and develop work which is meaningful. In a complex, uncertain and rapidly changing world, particularly following the Covid-19 pandemic, we explore the ways in which HEIs might support music students as they prepare for their futures. We argue that employability ecosystems may (...)
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  4. Qatipana: cybernetics and cosmotechnics in Latin American art ecosystems.Renzo Filinich Orozco, David Maulén de los Reyes & Benjamin Varas Arnello - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-11.
    In this essay, we explore the philosophical and theoretical resonances of the artwork Qatipana from the perspective of some key insights of Gilbert Simondon’s information processing system approach. Qatipana (Quechua word that means flow, sequence, transmission) is a hybrid ecosystem of information flow which, even though not the kind of dispositive systems theory was designed to read, offers some valuable empirical insights to test some key aspects of Simondon’s information processing systems. In particular, we are interested in observing how Simondon’s (...)
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  5. Exploring Open-Source Software Ecosystems for Hardware Development.J. C. Mariscal-Melgar, Pieter Hijma, Martin Häuer, Martin Schott, Julian Stirling, Timm Wille, Manuel Moritz & Tobias Redlich - 2024 - In Manuel Moritz, Tobias Redlich, Sonja Buxbaum-Conradi & Jens P. Wulfsberg (eds.), Global collaboration, local production: Fab City als Modell für Kreislaufwirtschaft und nachhaltige Entwicklung. Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden. pp. 187-199.
    Open-Source Hardware (OSH) and software ecosystems enable a collaborative development and manufacturing of physical artifacts. As we move towards new paradigms of production and consumption – libre software toolchains for hardware development warrant special attention. This chapter explores libre software, OSH, and software ecosystems to exemplify, illustrate, and provide food for thought to the curious reader to understand current trends in the Open-Source Hardware movement.
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  6. Using Plants of Novel Ecosystems as Resources to Create Green Roofs in Cities’ Adaptation to the Climate Change Process.Magdalena Biela & Edyta Sierka - 2023 - Studia Ecologiae Et Bioethicae 21 (4).
    Using local wild plant resources to create green roofs in urban areas is a sustainable solution that supports cities' adaptation strategies to climate change. Creating extensive green roofs, in accordance with the Nature-Based Solutions concept, supports minimizing the effects of climate change, loss of biodiversity and human health. The aim of this paper is to identify, based on an analysis of published research results, the main criteria for selecting vegetation introduced to green roofs and the role of green roofs in (...)
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  7. ‘Because they are a part of life:’ Children’s ideas about the welfare, rights, and protection of animals and ecosystems.Sandra Bosacki, Christine Tardif-Williams & Renata Roma - 2023 - Journal of Moral Education 52 (4):511-525.
    ABSTRACT This exploratory study assessed links among children’s moral concern and their ideas about the rights and protection of companion, farm, wild animals and ecosystems. Sixty-one children responded to three interview questions that were coded as either anthropocentric or biocentric in orientation. Results revealed unique links among children’s moral concern and their ideas about the rights and protection of different types of animals and ecosystems. Biocentric moral concern was associated with two protection strategies: 1) advocacy to protect companion animals and (...)
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  8. Entrevista a Olaff Ludwing Durand Núñez. Orientación educativa para la preservación de la ecología peruana.Jesús Miguel Delgado Del Aguila - 2023 - Argus-A. Artes and Humanidades 13 (49):1-4.
    En esta entrevista, el preservador Olaff Durand narra su experiencia como miembro de una organización ecológica, la cual se ha caracterizado por los cuidados que se han realizado al medioambiente. Estas actividades las han venido haciendo siempre de manera presencial, aunque en tiempo de pandemia se ha recurrido a virtualidad. Sin embargo, la labor y los proyectos ecológicos que él relata demuestran que ha habido un trabajo constante de concientización y de educación ambiental para los ciudadanos. En fin, esta conversación (...)
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  9. Support archetypes in ecosystems for social innovations.Nikolay A. Dentchev, Abel Alan Diaz Gonzalez & Xaver Neumeyer - 2023 - Business and Society Review 128 (4):661-671.
    Social innovations (SIs) offer creative solutions to complex social problems and often require the exchange of necessary resources, knowledge, and expertise among various actors. These actors form an ecosystem that can support the development of successful SIs. In this special topic forum introduction, we first discuss the literature related to the support function of ecosystems. We use the theoretical lens of prosocial behavior to explain the various types of support in an ecosystem. We argue that there are three archetypes of (...)
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  10. Ecosystems of Jubilee: economic ethics for the neighborhood.Adam L. Gustine - 2023 - Grand Rapids, Michigan: Zondervan Reflective. Edited by José Humphreys.
    Ecosystems of Jubilee, by José Humphreys and Adam Gustine, is a practical look at the economic ethics and practices found in the Scripture. Focusing on the biblical practices of gleaning, Sabbath, and Jubilee, this book aims to help Christians embrace a serious commitment to economic development as a way of seeking justice in their neighborhoods.
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  11. Identifying facilitators of and barriers to the adoption of dynamic consent in digital health ecosystems: a scoping review.Ah Ra Lee, Dongjun Koo, Il Kon Kim, Eunjoo Lee, Hyun Ho Kim, Sooyoung Yoo, Jeong-Hyun Kim, Eun Kyung Choi & Ho-Young Lee - 2023 - BMC Medical Ethics 24 (1):1-12.
    Background Conventional consent practices face ethical challenges in continuously evolving digital health environments due to their static, one-time nature. Dynamic consent offers a promising solution, providing adaptability and flexibility to address these ethical concerns. However, due to the immaturity of the concept and accompanying technology, dynamic consent has not yet been widely used in practice. This study aims to identify the facilitators of and barriers to adopting dynamic consent in real-world scenarios. Methods This scoping review, conducted in December 2022, adhered (...)
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  12. A resource‐based view on the role of universities in supportive ecosystems for social entrepreneurs.Abel Diaz-Gonzalez & Nikolay A. Dentchev - 2022 - Business and Society Review 127 (3):537-590.
    This paper investigates the role that universities play in supporting social entrepreneurs (SEs) across their ecosystem. Adopting the resource-based view (RBV) approach, we argue that universities attract, mobilize, and deploy multiple resources that benefit SEs through four main mechanisms (i.e., teaching, research, outreach, and the development of partnerships). We use a qualitative approach of 62 semi-structured interviews and 8 focus groups in Ecuador, Bolivia, and Colombia. Our contribution shows that employing different resources and engaging in supportive activities of universities towards (...)
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  13. Accountability of platform providers for unlawful personal data processing in their ecosystems–A socio-techno-legal analysis of Facebook and Apple's iOS according to GDPR.Christian Kurtz, Florian Wittner, Martin Semmann, Wolfgang Schulz & Tilo Böhmann - 2022 - Journal of Responsible Technology 9 (C):100018.
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  14. Community-level evolutionary processes: Linking community genetics with replicator-interactor theory.Christopher Lean, W. Ford Doolittle & Joseph Bielawski - 2022 - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 119 (46):e2202538119.
    Understanding community-level selection using Lewontin’s criteria requires both community-level inheritance and community-level heritability, and in the discipline of community and ecosystem genetics, these are often conflated. While there are existing studies that show the possibility of both, these studies impose community-level inheritance as a product of the experimental design. For this reason, these experiments provide only weak support for the existence of community-level selection in nature. By contrast, treating communities as interactors (in line with Hull’s replicator-interactor framework or Dawkins’s idea (...)
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  15. A laminated, emergentist view of skills ecosystems.Presha Ramsarup, Heila Lotz-Sisitka & Simon McGrath - 2022 - Journal of Critical Realism 21 (5):571-588.
    In this paper we present a model of vocational education and training (VET) that can be used to guide decisions relating to VET in Africa today. This model takes the critique of the neoclassical, neoliberal model of VET as its starting point. Guided by Bhaskar's Critical Naturalism, we use immanent critique to consider the adequacy of proposed alternatives to the neoclassical approach, such as: the heterodox approach, which foregrounds explanations based on human capital and political economy; and Hodgson and Spours' (...)
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  16. Rethinking hereditary relations: the reconstitutor as the evolutionary unit of heredity.Sophie J. Veigl, Javier Suárez & Adrian Stencel - 2022 - Synthese 200 (5):1-42.
    This paper introduces the reconstitutor as a comprehensive unit of heredity within the context of evolutionary research. A reconstitutor is the structure resulting from a set of relationships between different elements or processes that are actively involved in the recreation of a specific phenotypic variant in each generation regardless of the biomolecular basis of the elements or whether they stand in a continuous line of ancestry. Firstly, we justify the necessity of introducing the reconstitutor by showing the limitations of other (...)
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  17. To Marvel at the Manifold Connections: Philosophy, Biology, and Laudato Si’.Louis Caruana - 2021 - Gregorianum 102 (3):617-631.
    One of the aims of the encyclical "Laudato Si’" is to help us “marvel at the manifold connections existing among creatures”, to show how we are also involved, and to motivate us thereby to care for our common home. Are there new dimensions of beauty available to us today because of recent advances in biology? In this paper I seek to answer this question by first recalling the basic criteria for beauty, as expressed by Aristotle and Aquinas, and then evaluating (...)
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  18. Does environmental science crowd out non-epistemic values?Kinley Gillette, Stephen Andrew Inkpen & C. Tyler DesRoches - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 87 (C):81-92.
  19. Platforms as Markets, Architectures, and Ecosystems: A Review of the Dominant Approaches in the Platform Literature. [REVIEW]Alina Kontareva - 2021 - Sociology of Power 33 (1):169-192.
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  20. Should we Ascribe Capabilities to Species and Ecosystems? A Critical Analysis of Ecocentric Versions of the Capabilities Approach.Anders Melin - 2021 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 34 (5):1-13.
    Martha Nussbaum’s capabilities approach is today one of the most influential theories of justice. In her earlier works on the capabilities approach, Nussbaum only applies it to humans, but in later works she extends the capabilities approach to include sentient animals. Contrary to Nussbaum’s own view, some scholars, for example, David Schlosberg, Teea Kortetmäki and Daniel L. Crescenzo, want to extend the capabilities approach even further to include collective entities, such as species and ecosystems. Though I think we have strong (...)
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  21. Entrepreneurial Ecosystems: A Gender Perspective.Banu Ozkazanc-Pan & Susan Clark Muntean - 2021 - Cambridge University Press.
    Based on extensive fieldwork, this book demonstrates how gender is an organizing principle of entrepreneurial ecosystems and makes a difference in how ecosystem resources are assembled and how they can be accessed. By bringing visibility to how ecosystem actors are heterogeneous across identities, interactions and experiences, the book highlights the role and complexity of individual, organizational, and institutional factors working in concert to create and maintain gendered inequities. Entrepreneurial Ecosystems provides research-driven insights around effective organizational practices and policies aimed at (...)
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  22. Development of business ecosystems in modern conditions.Elena Mikhailovna Puchkova, Irina Viktorovna Sinitsyna & Olga Nikolaevna Nikulina - 2021 - Kant 39 (2):90-95.
    The purpose of the study is to reveal the features of the formation and functioning of Russian business ecosystems in modern conditions, to identify their main advantages and disadvantages, to propose ways to solve problems caused by a radical change in the digital space. The article examines the prerequisites for the emergence of business ecosystems, the features of their legal regulation, analyzes the options for organizational and technological structures, the problems of interaction of all participants in the process. Scientific novelty (...)
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  23. Preliminary study of moth (Insecta: Lepidoptera) in Coonoor forest area from Nilgiri District Tamil Nadu, India.Moinudheen Dheen - 2020 - International Journal of Scientific Research in Research Paper Biological Sciences 7 (3):52-61.
    This present study was conducted at Coonoor Forestdale area during the year 2018-2019. Through this study, a total of 212 species was observed from the study area which represented 212 species from 29 families. Most of the moth species were abundance in July to August. Moths are the most vulnerable organism, with slight environmental changes. Erebidae, Crambidae and Geometridae are the most abundant families throughout the year. The Coonoor Forestdale area was showed a number of new records and seems to (...)
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  24. Informative ecological models without ecological forces.Justin Donhauser - 2020 - Synthese 197 (6):2721-2743.
    Sagoff (2016) criticizes widely used “theoretical” methods in ecology; arguing that those methods employ models that rely on problematic metaphysical assumptions and are therefore uninformative and useless for practical decision-making. In this paper, I show that Sagoff misconstrues how such model-based methods work in practice, that the main threads of his argument are problematic, and that his substantive conclusions are consequently unfounded. Along the way, I illuminate several ways the model-based inferential methods he criticizes can be, and have been, usefully (...)
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  25. Why the mountains.Deepa Kansra & Kirat Sodhi - 2020 - Giri Foundation.
    Mountains have gained global recognition for their sacredness and biodiversity. Over the years, scientists, researchers, local bodies and states have made efforts to protect and preserve the mountains. Perrigo, Hoorn and Antonelli call them the cradles of diversity, which need to be studied in order to understand nature and mountain biodiversity. (2019). The growing work on the mountains can be located in the awakening of earth consciousness in the world. Earth consciousness or what may also be called the universal respect (...)
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  26. The Unfolding of a New Vision of Life, Cosmos and Evolution.Agustin Ostachuk - 2020 - Ludus Vitalis 28 (53):81-83.
    Has science already answered the fundamental questions about the concepts of Life, Cosmos and Evolution? Has science not relegated these fundamental questions by following up on more immediate, “useful” and practical endeavors that ultimately ensure that the wheel of capitalism keeps spinning in its frantic search for material and economic progress? There is something terribly wrong with the current theory of evolution, understood as the Darwinian theory with its successive versions and extensions. The concept of natural selection, the cornerstone of (...)
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  27. Don’t Demean “Invasives”: Conservation and Wrongful Species Discrimination.C. E. Abbate & Bob Fischer - 2019 - Animals 871 (9).
    It is common for conservationists to refer to non-native species that have undesirable impacts on humans as “invasive”. We argue that the classification of any species as “invasive” constitutes wrongful discrimination. Moreover, we argue that its being wrong to categorize a species as invasive is perfectly compatible with it being morally permissible to kill animals—assuming that conservationists “kill equally”. It simply is not compatible with the double standard that conservationists tend to employ in their decisions about who lives and who (...)
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  28. Diverse Environments, Diverse People.Matthew J. Barker - 2019 - In C. Tyler DesRoches, Frank Jankunis & Byron Williston (eds.), Canadian Environmental Philosophy. Mcgill-Queen's University Press. pp. 99-122.
    This paper is about both an application of virtue ethics, and about virtue ethics itself. A popular application of neo-Aristotelian virtue ethics to environmental issues is called interpersonal extensionism. It argues that we should view the normative range of traditional interpersonal virtues, such as compassion and humility, as extending beyond our interactions with people to also include our interactions with non-human environments. This paper uncovers an unaddressed problem for this view, then proposes a solution by revising how we understand neo-Aristotelian (...)
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  29. Functional Biodiversity and the Concept of Ecological Function.Antoine C. Dussault - 2019 - In Elena Casetta, Davide Vecchi & Jorge Miguel Luz Marques da Silva (eds.), From Assessing to Conserving biodiversity: Beyond the Species Approach. Dordrecht, Pays-Bas: Springer. pp. 297-316.
    This chapter argues that the common claim that the ascription of ecological functions to organisms in functional ecology raises issues about levels of natural selection is ill-founded. This claim, I maintain, mistakenly assumes that the function concept as understood in functional ecology aligns with the selected effect theory of function advocated by many philosophers of biology (sometimes called “The Standard Line” on functions). After exploring the implications of Wilson and Sober’s defence of multilevel selection for the prospects of defending a (...)
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  30. Ecological Theory and the Superfluous Niche.James Justus - 2019 - Philosophical Topics 47 (1):105-123.
    Perhaps no concept has been thought more important to ecological theorizing than the niche. Without it, technically sophisticated and well-regarded accounts of character displacement, ecological equivalence, limiting similarity, and others would seemingly never have been developed. The niche is also widely considered the centerpiece of the best candidate for a distinctively ecological law, the competitive exclusion principle. But the incongruous array and imprecise character of proposed definitions of the concept square poorly with its apparent scientific centrality. I argue this definitional (...)
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  31. General Unificatory Theories in Community Ecology.Christopher Hunter Lean - 2019 - Philosophical Topics 47 (1):125-142.
    The question of whether there are laws of nature in ecology has developed substantially in the last 20 years. Many have attempted to rehabilitate ecology’s lawlike status through establishing that ecology possesses laws that robustly appear across many different ecological systems. I argue that there is still something missing, which explains why so many have been skeptical of ecology’s lawlike status. Community ecology has struggled to establish what I call a General Unificatory Theory. The lack of a GUT causes problems (...)
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  32. The Organism and its Umwelt: a Counterpoint between the Theories of Uexküll, Goldstein and Canguilhem.Agustin Ostachuk - 2019 - In Francesca Michelini & Kristian Köchy (eds.), Jakob von Uexküll and Philosophy: Life, Environments, Anthropology. New York, NY: Routledge. pp. 158-171.
    The topic of the relationship between the organism and its environment runs through the theories of Uexküll, Goldstein and Canguilhem with equal importance. In this work a counterpoint will be established between their theories, in the attempt to assess at which points the melodies are concordant and at which points they are discordant. As fundamental basis to his theory, Uexküll relies on the concept of conformity to a plan, which allows him to account for the congruity and perfect adjustment between (...)
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  33. The hologenome concept of evolution: a philosophical and biological study.Javier Suárez - 2019 - Dissertation, University of Exeter
    The hologenome concept of evolution is a hypothesis about the evolution of animals and plants. It asserts that the evolution of animals and plants was partially triggered by their interactions with their symbiotic microbiomes. In that vein, the hologenome concept posits that the holobiont (animal host + symbionts of the microbiome) is a unit of selection. -/- The hologenome concept has been severely criticized on the basis that selection on holobionts would only be possible if there were a tight transgenerational (...)
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  34. Deep time & myriad ecosystems : urban biotic imaginaries and unstable planetary aesthetics.Linda Williams - 2019 - In Margaret Cohen & Killian Colm Quigley (eds.), The aesthetics of the undersea. New York: Routledge Taylor & Francis Group.
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  35. Ecological Historicity, Functional Goals, and Novelty in the Anthropocene.Justin Donhauser, Eric Desjardins & Gillian Barker - 2018 - Environmental Values.
    While many recognize that rigid historical and compositional goals are inadequate in a world where climate and other global systems are undergoing unprecedented changes, others contend that promoting ecosystem services and functions encourages practices that can ultimately lower the bar of ecological management. These worries are foregrounded in discussions about Novel Ecosystems (NEs); where some researchers and conservationists claim that NEs provide a license to trash nature as long as some ecosystem services are provided. This criticism arises from what we (...)
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  36. Rewilding in Cultural Layered Landscapes.Martin Drenthen - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (4):325-330.
    introduction to the theme issue of Environmental Values on Rewilding in cultural layered landscapes. Rewilding projects, especially in culturally saturated landscapes, are often being opposed by those who deeply care about the old cultural landscapes (for cultural or ecological reasons). Indeed, some proponents of rewilding today fall back on the language that was developed by the early proponents of wilderness preservation, starting off from an opposition between wild nature and culture, and claiming that nature needs to be protected against human (...)
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  37. Rewilding in Layered Landscapes as a Challenge to Place Identity.Martin Drenthen - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (4):405-425.
    Rewilding is an increasingly popular strategy in landscape management, yet it is also controversial, especially when applied in culturally 'layered' landscapes. In this paper I examine what is morally at stake in debates between proponents of rewilding and those that see traditional cultural landscapes as worthy of protection. I will argue that rewilding should not only be understood as a conservation practice, but that we also need to understand its hermeneutic aspect. Rewilding implies a radical non-anthropocentric normative reinterpretation of landscape (...)
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  38. Africanizing Science in Post-colonial Kenya: Long-Term Field Research in the Amboseli Ecosystem, 1963–1989.Amanda E. Lewis - 2018 - Journal of the History of Biology 51 (3):535-562.
    Following Kenya’s independence in 1963, scientists converged on an ecologically sensitive area in southern Kenya on the northern slope of Mt. Kilimanjaro called Amboseli. This region is the homeland of the Ilkisongo Maasai who grazed this ecosystem along with the wildlife of interest to the scientists. Biologists saw opportunities to study this complex community, an environment rich in biological diversity. The Amboseli landscape proved to be fertile ground for testing new methods and lines of inquiry in the biological sciences that (...)
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  39. The instability of field experiments: building an experimental research tradition on the rocky seashores.Jean-Baptiste Grodwohl, Franco Porto & Charbel N. El-Hani - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (3):45.
    In many experimental sciences, like particle physics or molecular biology, the proper place for establishing facts is the laboratory. In the sciences of population biology, however, the laboratory is often seen as a poor approximation of what occurs in nature. Results obtained in the field are usually more convincing. This raises special problems: it is much more difficult to obtain stable, repeatable results in the field, where environmental conditions vary out of the experimenter’s control, than in the laboratory. We examine (...)
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  40. Understanding Leopold’s Concept of “Interdependence” for Environmental Ethics and Conservation Biology.Roberta L. Millstein - 2018 - Philosophy of Science 85 (5):1127-1139.
    Aldo Leopold’s Land Ethic, an extremely influential view in environmental ethics and conservation biology, is committed to the claim that interdependence between humans, other species, and abiotic entities plays a central role in our ethical responsibilities. Thus, a robust understanding of “interdependence” is necessary for evaluating the viability of the Land Ethic and related views, including ecological ones. I characterize and defend a Leopoldian concept of “interdependence,” arguing that it ought to include both negative and positive causal relations. I also (...)
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  41. Debunking Myths About Aldo Leopold’s Land Ethic.Roberta L. Millstein - 2018 - Biological Conservation 217:391–396.
    Aldo Leopold's land ethic has been extremely influential among people working in conservation biology, environmental ethics, and related fields. Others have abandoned the land ethic for purportedly being outdated or ethically untenable. Yet, both acceptance of the land ethic and rejection of the land ethic are often based on misunderstandings of Leopold's original meaning – misunderstandings that have become so entrenched as to have the status of myths. This essay seeks to identify and then debunk six myths that have grown (...)
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  42. Is Aldo Leopold's 'Land Community' an Individual?Roberta L. Millstein - 2018 - In O. Bueno, R. Chen & M. B. Fagan (eds.), Individuation across Experimental and Theoretical Sciences. Oxford University Press. pp. 279-302.
    The “land community” (or “biotic community”) that features centrally in Aldo Leopold’s Land Ethic has typically been equated with the concept of “ecosystem.” Moreover, some have challenged this central Leopoldean concept given the multitude of meanings of the term “ecosystem” and the changes the term has undergone since Leopold’s time (see, e.g., Shrader-Frechette 1996). Even one of Leopold’s primary defenders, J. Baird Callicott, asserts that there are difficulties in identifying the boundaries of ecosystems and suggests that we recognize that their (...)
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  43. Non-Human Climate Refugees: The Role that Urban Communities Should Play in Ensuring Ecological Resilience.Samantha Noll - 2018 - Environmental Ethics 40 (2):119-134.
    Urban residents have the potential to play a key role in helping to facilitate ecological resilience of wilderness areas and ecosystems beyond the city by helping ensure the migration of nonhuman climate refugee populations. Three ethical frameworks related to this issue could determine whether we have an ethical duty to help nonhuman climate refugee populations: ethical individualism, ethical holism, and species ethics. Using each of these frameworks could support the stronger view that policy makers and members of the public have (...)
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  44. Life: the Center of our Existence.Agustin Ostachuk - 2018 - Ludus Vitalis 26 (50):257-260.
    Life is the center of our existence. One would be tempted to say that first of all we live. However, our existence does not seem to pass in that modality. The exacerbated materialism in which our existence takes place, displaces life from the center of the scene. Our society is organized around production, consumerism, exploitation, efficiency, trade and propaganda. That is to say, our existence seems to have economy as the center of organization of our activities. The struggle of this (...)
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  45. Anchoring in Ecosystemic Kinds.Matthew H. Slater - 2018 - Synthese 195 (4):1487-1508.
    The world contains many different types of ecosystems. This is something of a commonplace in biology and conservation science. But there has been little attention to the question of whether such ecosystem types enjoy a degree of objectivity—whether they might be natural kinds. I argue that traditional accounts of natural kinds that emphasize nomic or causal–mechanistic dimensions of “kindhood” are ill-equipped to accommodate presumptive ecosystemic kinds. In particular, unlike many other kinds, ecosystemic kinds are “anchored” to the contingent character of (...)
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  46. Towards an ecological view of immunity.Swiatczak Bartlomiej - 2017 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 63:85-88.
    The immune system does not just fight pathogens but also engages in interactions with beneficial microbes and non-immune cells of the body to harmonize their behavior by means of cytokines, antibodies and effector cells (Dinarello, 2007; Moticka, 2015, pp. 217e226, 261e267). However, the importance of these “housekeeping” functions has not been fully appreciated (Cohen, 2000). In his new book Immunity: The Evolution of an Idea Alfred I. Tauber traces the history of fundamental ideas in immunology and refers to recent advances (...)
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  47. Making Ecological Values Make Sense: Toward More Operationalizable Ecological Legislation.Justin Donhauser - 2016 - Ethics and the Environment 21 (2):1-25.
    Value claims about ecological entities, their functionality, and properties take center stage in so-called “ecological” ethical and aesthetic theories. For example, the claim that the biodiversity in an old-growth forest imbues it with “value in and for itself” is an explicit value claim about an ecological property. And the claim that one can study “the aesthetics of nature, including natural objects...such as ecosystems” presupposes that natural instances of a type of ecological entity exist and can be regarded as more or (...)
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  48. Is it Possible to Care for Ecosystems? Policy Paralysis and Ecosystem Management.Robert K. Garcia & Jonathan A. Newman - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):170-182.
    Conservationists have two types of arguments for why we should conserve ecosystems: instrumental and intrinsic value arguments. Instrumental arguments contend that we ought to conserve ecosystems because of the benefits that humans, or other morally relevant individuals, derive from ecosystems. Conservationists are often loath to rely too heavily on the instrumental argument because it could potentially force them to admit that some ecosystems are not at all useful to humans, or that if they are, they are not more useful than (...)
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  49. Model Coupling in Resource Economics: Conditions for Effective Interdisciplinary Collaboration.MacLeod Miles & Michiru Nagatsu - 2016 - Philosophy of Science 83 (3):412-433.
    In this article we argue for the importance of studying interdisciplinary collaborations by focusing on the role that good choice and design of model-building frameworks and strategies can play overcoming the inherent difficulties of collaborative research. We provide an empirical study of particular collaborations between economists and ecologists in resource economics. We discuss various features of how models are put together for interdisciplinary collaboration in these cases and show how the use of a coupled-model framework in this case to coordinate (...)
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  50. Option Value, Substitutable Species, and Ecosystem Services.Erik Persson - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (2):165-181.
    The concept of ecosystem services is a way of visualizing the instrumental value that nature has for human beings. Most ecosystem services can be performed by more than one species. This fact is sometimes used as an argument against the preservation of species. However, even though substitutability does detract from the instrumental value of a species, it also adds option value to it. The option value cannot make a substitutable species as instrumentally valuable as a non-substitutable species, but in many (...)
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