Results for 'Confucianism'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Neo-Confucianism: A Philosophical Introduction.Stephen C. Angle & Justin Tiwald - 2017 - Cambridge, UK: Polity. Edited by Justin Tiwald.
    Neo-Confucianism is a philosophically sophisticated tradition weaving classical Confucianism together with themes from Buddhism and Daoism. It began in China around the eleventh century CE, played a leading role in East Asian cultures over the last millennium, and has had a profound influence on modern Chinese society. -/- Based on the latest scholarship but presented in accessible language, Neo-Confucianism: A Philosophical Introduction is organized around themes that are central in Neo-Confucian philosophy, including the structure of the cosmos, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  2. Confucianism, Perfectionism, and Liberal Society.Franz Mang - 2018 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 17 (1):29-49.
    Confucian scholars should satisfy two conditions insofar as they think their theories enable Confucianism to make contributions to liberal politics and social policy. The liberal accommodation condition stipulates that the theory in question should accommodate as many reasonable conceptions of the good and religious doctrines as possible while the intelligibility condition stipulates that the theory must have a recognizable Confucian character. By and large, Joseph Chan’s Confucian perfectionism is able to satisfy the above two conditions. However, contrary to Chan (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  3.  56
    Neo-confucianism in history.Peter Kees Bol - 2008 - Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
    Where does Neo-Confucianismâe"a movement that from the twelfth to the seventeenth centuries profoundly influenced the way people understood the world and responded to itâe"fit into our story of Chinaâe(tm)s history? This interpretive, at times polemical, inquiry into the Neo-Confucian engagement with the literati as the social and political elite, local society, and the imperial state during the Song, Yuan, and Ming dynasties is also a reflection on the role of the middle period in Chinaâe(tm)s history. The book argues that as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  4.  6
    Confucianism.Paul Rakita Goldin - 2010 - Routledge.
    "Confucianism" presents the history and salient tenets of Confucian thought, and discusses its viability, from both a social and a philosophical point of view, in the modern world. Despite most of the major Confucian texts having been translated into English, there remains a surprising lack of straightforward textbooks on Confucian philosophy in any Western language. Those that do exist are often oriented from the point of view of Western philosophy - or, worse, a peculiar school of thought within Western (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  5.  4
    Confucianism.Paul Rakita Goldin - 2010 - Routledge.
    "Confucianism" presents the history and salient tenets of Confucian thought, and discusses its viability, from both a social and a philosophical point of view, in the modern world. Despite most of the major Confucian texts having been translated into English, there remains a surprising lack of straightforward textbooks on Confucian philosophy in any Western language. Those that do exist are often oriented from the point of view of Western philosophy - or, worse, a peculiar school of thought within Western (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  6. Confucianism and ubuntu: Reflections on a dialogue between chinese and african traditions.Daniel A. Bell & Thaddeus Metz - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (s1):78-95.
    In this article we focus on three key precepts shared by Confucianism and the African ethic of Ubuntu: the central value of community, the desirability of ethical partiality, and the idea that we tend to become morally better as we grow older. For each of these broad similarities, there are key differences underlying them, and we discuss those as well as speculate about the reasons for them. Our aim is not to take sides, but we do suggest ways that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  7. Confucianism and ritual.Hagop Sarkissian - 2022 - In Jennifer Oldstone-Moore (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Confucianism. Oxford University Press.
    Confucian writings on ritual from the classical period (ca 8th-3rd centuries BCE), including instruction manuals, codes of conduct, and treatises on the origins and function of ritual in human life, are impressive in scope and repay careful engagement. These texts maintain that ritual participation fosters social and emotional development, helps persons deal with significant life events such as marriages and deaths, and helps resolve political disagreements. These early sources are of interest not only to historians and Sinologists, but also to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8. Confucianism and Public Political Discussion.Franz Mang - 2023 - Comparative Political Theory 3 (2):154-168.
    What role, if any, should Confucianism play in the politics of our time? In some of my previous works, I claimed that modern liberal states are not permitted to promote Confucian values on the basis of their intrinsic merits. Yet, drawing insights from Joseph Chan’s moderate state perfectionism and John Rawls’s wide view of public political culture, I proposed the “wide view of moderate perfectionism.” According to this view, in public political discussion, citizens should be allowed to deliberate whether (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Confucianism and ethics in the western philosophical tradition I: Foundational concepts.Mary I. Bockover - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (4):307-316.
    Confucianism conceives of persons as being necessarily interdependent, defining personhood in terms of the various roles one embodies and that are established by the relationships basic to one's life. By way of contrast, the Western philosophical tradition has predominantly defined persons in terms of intrinsic characteristics not thought to depend on others. This more strictly and explicitly individualistic concept of personhood contrasts with the Confucian idea that one becomes a person because of others; where one is never a person (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  10. Confucianism and African Philosophy.Thaddeus Metz - 2017 - In Stu Woolman (ed.), Constitutional Law of South Africa, 2nd Edition. Juta. pp. 207-222.
    A reprint in English of 'Confucianism and African Conceptions of Value, Reality and Knowledge' (International Social Science Journal, Chinese Edition, 2016).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11.  32
    Confucianism and American Philosophy.Mathew A. Foust - 2017 - Albany, USA: SUNY Press.
    In this highly original work, Mathew A. Foust breaks new ground in comparative studies through his exploration of the connections between Confucianism and the American Transcendentalist and Pragmatist movements. In his examination of a broad range of philosophers, including Confucius, Mencius, Xunzi, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Charles Peirce, William James, and Josiah Royce, Foust traces direct lines of influence from early translations of Confucian texts and brings to light conceptual affinities that have been previously overlooked. Combining resources (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  12.  19
    Teaching Confucianism.Jeffrey L. Richey (ed.) - 2008 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Even the most casual observer of Chinese society is aware of the tremendous significance of Confucianism as a linchpin of both ancient and modern Chinese identity. Furthermore, the Confucian tradition has exercised enormous influence over the values and institutions of the other cultures of East Asia, an influence that continues to be important in the global Asian diaspora. If forecasters are correct in labeling the 21st century 'the Chinese century,' teachers and scholars of religious studies and theology will be (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  19
    Confucianism and Ecology: The Interrelation of Heaven, Earth, and Humans.John Berthrong & Mary Evelyn Tucker (eds.) - 1998 - Harvard Univ Ctr for The.
    Indeed, nearly one quarter of the world's population has been influenced by Confucianism in some way, especially in family structures and values. The challenge, as Tu Weiming suggests, is to ensure the continuance of tradition in modernity, thereby achieving an effective counterpoint to the destruction of both human communities and the Earth community.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  14. Confucianism and Democracy: Four Models of Compatibility.Sophia Gao & Aaron J. Walayat - 2021 - Journal of Chinese Humanities 6 (2-3):213-234.
    In recent years, Philosophy Departments at universities in China and worldwide have experienced a renaissance in discussion on Confucian thought. As the country draws from indigenous traditions, rather than leaning completely on the importation of Western liberalism and Marxism, Confucianism has critical implications for politics, ethics, and law in modern China. At the same time, democracy never left the conversation. Democratic concepts cannot be ignored and must be disposed of, acknowledged, or incorporated. The relationship between Confucianism and democracy (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  28
    Political Confucianism and the Politics of Confucian Studies.Eske J. Møllgaard - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (3):391-402.
    Through the 1980s Confucian studies in the United States tended to present Confucianism as compatible with liberal democratic values. Since the 1990s, after the rise of China as a global power, Confucianism is increasingly defended as a political alternative to liberal and democratic values. This essay argues that Confucianism is not compatible with liberal democratic values, and that the rise of political Confucianism opposed to liberal democracy is a return to a more authentic Confucianism. Furthermore, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  16.  21
    Confucianism's Challenge to Western Bioethics.Lisa M. Rasmussen - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (4):73-74.
    What about Confucian bioethics should compel our interest? Apart from the fact that Confucianism grounds the belief system of a great number of people, a Confucian bioethics poses a profound challe...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  17.  91
    Confucianism and ethics in the western philosophical tradition II: A comparative analysis of personhood.Mary I. Bockover - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (4):317-325.
    This Philosophy Compass article continues the comparison between Confucian and mainstream Western views of personhood and their connection with ethics begun in Confucianism and Ethics in the Western Philosophical Tradition I: Fundamental Concepts , by focusing on the Western self conceived as an independent agent with moral and political rights. More specifically, the present article briefly accounts for how the more strictly and explicitly individualistic notion of self dominating Western philosophy has developed, leading up to a recent debate in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  18.  16
    Confucianism as Religion: Controversies and Consequences by Yong Chen.Clemens Büttner - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):569-571.
    In Confucianism as Religion: Controversies and Consequences, Yong Chen takes an interesting approach to the subject of Confucian religiosity: he concentrates on analyzing the intellectual and academic debate about the question of whether Confucianism is a religion and highlights its cultural as well as socio-political implications for contemporary China, assuming that this debate coincided with a transition from the predominance of Confucian paradigms to those of modernity. Without this paradigmatic shift, argues Chen, the past and ongoing controversy about (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  5
    Confucianism in the Heart, Buddhist Traces—a Study on Stele Inscriptions by Scholars in the Silla Period.Ying Qin & Hailong Sun - 2023 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 15 (3):239-256.
    Little is known about the Korean Peninsula before 12 th century, due to which potentially biased assessments of its social, cultural, and political history exist. This study attempted to unearth the history of the Korean Peninsula since the late 10th century through the Buddhist inscriptions. These inscriptions unveil the authentic social environment, religious beliefs, and political ecology of late Silla and delve into the political motives and life philosophies of Silla scholars who studied the Tang Dynasty, especially their approach of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  25
    Does Confucianism Reduce Minority Shareholder Expropriation? Evidence from China.Xingqiang Du - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (4):661-716.
    Using a sample of 12,061 firm-year observations from the Chinese stock market for the period of 2001–2011 and geographic-proximity-based Confucianism variables, this study provides strong evidence that Confucianism is significantly negatively associated with minority shareholder expropriation, implying that Confucianism does mitigate agency conflicts between the controlling shareholder and minority shareholders. This finding suggests that Confucianism has important influence on business ethics, and thus can serve as an important ethical philosophy or social norm to mitigate the controlling (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  21. Is confucianism compatible with care ethics? A critique.Ranjoo Seodu Herr - 2003 - Philosophy East and West 53 (4):471-489.
    This essay critically examines a suggestion proposed by some Confucianists that Confucianism and Care Ethics share striking similarities and that feminism in Confucian societies might take “a new form of Confucianism.” Aspects of Confucianism and Care Ethics that allegedly converge are examined, including the emphasis on human relationships, and it is argued that while these two perspectives share certain surface similarities, moral injunctions entailed by their respective ideals of ren and caring are not merely distinctive but in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  22.  43
    Does Confucianism Reduce Board Gender Diversity? Firm-Level Evidence from China.Xingqiang Du - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (2):399-436.
    This study extends previous literature on the association between Confucianism and corporate decisions by examining Confucianism’s influence on board gender diversity. Using a sample of Chinese listed firms during the period of 2001–2011 and geographic-proximity-based Confucianism variables, I provide strong and consistent evidence to show that Confucianism is significantly negatively associated with board gender diversity, suggesting that the proportion of women directors in the boardroom is significantly lower for firms surrounded by strong Confucianism atmosphere than (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  23.  41
    Reconciling Confucianism and Nationalism.Daniel A. Bell - 2014 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 41 (1-2):33-54.
    Confucianism has made a comeback in mainland China over the last two decades or so. Politically minded Confucian revivalists see Confucianism as the core of national identity that differs from “foreign” traditions such as liberalism and they argue for replacing Marxism with Confucianism as the core ideology of the one-party state. But is the ancient tradition of Confucianism compatible with the modern tradition of nationalism? And is it possible to defend a morally appealing form of “Confucian (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24. Is Confucianism Good for Business Ethics in China?Po Keung Ip - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S3):463-476.
    This article examines whether and to what extent Confucianism as a resilient Chinese cultural tradition can be used as a sound basis of business practice and management model for Chinese corporations in the twenty-first century. Using the core elements of Confucianism, the article constructs a notion of a Confucian Firm with its concepts of the moral person ( Junzi ), core human morality ( ren, yi, li ) and relationships ( guanxi ), as well as benign social structure (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  25. Confucianism for the Modern World.Daniel A. Bell & Hahm Chaibong (eds.) - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    While Confucian ideals continue to inspire thinkers and political actors, discussions of concrete Confucian practices and institutions appropriate for the modern era have been conspicuously absent from the literature thus far. This volume represents the most cutting edge effort to spell out in meticulous detail the relevance of Confucianism for the contemporary world. The contributors to this book - internationally renowned philosophers, lawyers, historians, and social scientists - argue for feasible and desirable Confucian policies and institutions as they attempt (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  26.  26
    Boston Confucianism: portable tradition in the late-modern world.Robert C. Neville - 2000 - Albany, N.Y.: State University of New York Press.
    Promoting multiculturalism through renewed East-West and Confucian-Christian dialogue, Neville (philosophy, religion, and theology, Boston U.) fosters the idea ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  27.  57
    Confucianism, Democracy, and the Virtue of Deference.Aaron Stalnaker - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (4):441-459.
    Some democratic theorists have argued that contemporary people should practice only a civility that recognizes others as equal persons, and eschew any form of deference to authority as a feudalistic cultural holdover that ought to be abandoned in the modern era. Against such views, this essay engages early Confucian views of ethics and society, including their analyses of different sorts of authority and status, in order to argue that, properly understood, deference is indeed a virtue of considerable importance for contemporary (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  28.  3
    Neo-Confucianism in Korea.Chai-Shin Yu (ed.) - 2016 - Fremont, California: Asian Humanities Press, an imprint of Jain Publishing Company.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Confucianism and the Liturgy: An Analectical Argument for the High Church Traditions.Joseph Blado & Tyler Dalton McNabb - 2020 - TheoLogica: An International Journal for Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology 4 (1).
    In Confucian thought, there exists a functional view of rituals in which the participation in ritualistic practices brings about human flourishing. Call this the Confucian Ritual Principle (CRP). Utilizing contemporary psychology, in this paper, we argue for CRP. After linking rituals to human flourishing, we argue that on the hypothesis that Christianity is true, we would expect God to establish highly ritualistic and dogmatic liturgies. Put slightly differently, we argue that we should expect what we call 'high church' on the (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Confucianism and Human Rights.Justin Tiwald - 2011 - In Thomas Cushman (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Human Rights. Routledge. pp. 244-254.
    One of the most high-profile debates in Chinese philosophy concerns the compatibility of human and individual rights with basic Confucian doctrines and practices. Defenders of the incompatibilist view argue that rights are inconsistent with Confucianism because rights are (necessarily) role-independent obligations and entitlements, whereas Confucians think that all obligations and entitlements are role-dependent. Two other arguments have to do with the practice of claiming one's own rights, holding (a) that claiming one's rights undercuts family-like community bonds and (b) that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  31.  9
    Confucianism and the Philosophy of Well-Being.Richard Kim - 2020 - New York: Routledge.
    Well-being is topic of perennial concern. It has been of significant interest to scholars across disciplines, culture, and time. But like morality, conceptions of well-being are deeply shaped and influenced by one's particular social and cultural context. We ought to pursue, therefore, a cross-cultural understanding of well-being and moral psychology by taking seriously reflections from a variety of moral traditions. This book develops a Confucian account of well-being, considering contemporary accounts of ethics and virtue in light of early Confucian thought (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  32. Confucianism, Puritanism, and the Transcendental.Thorsten Botz-Bornstein - 2011 - ProtoSociology 28:153-172.
    Max Weber examined Chinese society and European Puritanism at the beginning of the Twentieth Century in order to find out why capitalism did not develop in China. He found that Confucianism and Puritanism are mutually exclusive, which enabled him to oppose both in the form of two different kinds of rationalism. I attempt neither to refute nor to confirm the Weberian thought model. Instead I show that a similar model applies to Jean Baudrillard’s vision of American culture, a culture (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  11
    Confucianism and Deweyan pragmatism: resources for a new geopolitics of interdependence.Roger T. Ames, Chen Yajun & Peter D. Hershock (eds.) - 2021 - Honolulu: University of Hawaiʻi Press.
    Over the past generation, the rise of East Asia and especially China, has brought about a sea change in the economic and political world order. At the same time, global warming, environmental degradation, food and water shortages, population explosion, and income inequities have created a perfect storm that threatens the very survival of humanity. It is clear now that the Westphalian model of individual sovereign states seeking their own self-interest will not be able to respond effectively to this win-win or (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  3
    Confucianism for the contemporary world: global order, political plurality, and social action.Tze-Ki Hon (ed.) - 2017 - Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.
    Discusses contemporary Confucianism's relevance and its capacity to address pressing social and political issues of twenty-first-century life. Condemned during the Maoist era as a relic of feudalism, Confucianism enjoyed a robust revival in post-Mao China as China’s economy began its rapid expansion and gradual integration into the global economy. Associated with economic development, individual growth, and social progress by its advocates, Confucianism became a potent force in shaping politics and society in mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  44
    Confucianism between tradition and modernity, religion, and secularization: Questions to Tu Weiming.Heiner Roetz - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (4):367-380.
    Weiming’s program of overcoming the enlightenment mentality and throws a critical light on his conceptions of religious or spiritual Confucianism, of a Confucian modernity, and of the multiple modernities theory in general. It defends a unitary rather than multiple concept of modernity in terms of the realization of a morally controlled principle of free subjectivity and tries to show how Confucianism, understood as a secular ethics, could contribute to this goal.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  36.  18
    Confucianism, Commerce, Capitalism.Henrique Schneider - 2020 - Culture and Dialogue 8 (2):295-322.
    This paper discusses commerce in Early Confucianism. It argues that the virtuous Confucian agent engages with the world in different ways, including in commerce – it is another way of acting with virtue. This conception is compared with two roughly contemporary approaches in economics, the thought of Wilhelm Röpke and the Humanomics project by Vernon Smith. In both, virtue is constitutive to commerce. However, they differ substantially in the exact relationship between virtue and commerce. While in Early Confucianism (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  94
    Confucianism and Neo-Confucianism.Justin Tiwald - 2018 - In Nancy E. Snow (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Virtue. New York, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 171-89.
    In this chapter the author defends the view that the major variants of Confucian ethics qualify as virtue ethics in the respects that matter most, which concern the focus, investigative priority, and explanatory priority of virtue over right action. The chapter also provides short summaries of the central Confucian virtues and then explains how different Confucians have understood the relationship between these and what some regard as the chief or most comprehensive virtue, ren (humaneness or benevolence). Finally, it explicates what (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  38. Confucianism, Curiosity, and Moral Self-Cultivation.Ian James Kidd - 2018 - In Ilhan Inan, Lani Watson, Dennis Whitcomb & Safiye Yigit (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Curiosity. Rowman & Littlefield International. pp. 97-116.
    I propose that Confucianism incorporates a latent commitment to the closely related epistemic virtues of curiosity and inquisitiveness. Confucian praise of certain people, practices, and dispositions is only fully intelligible if these are seen as exercises and expressions of epistemic virtues, of which curiosity and inquisitiveness are the obvious candidates. My strategy is to take two core components of Confucian ethical and educational practice and argue that each presupposes a specific virtue. To have and to express a ‘love of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39. Confucianism and the idea of equality.A. T. Nuyen - 2001 - Asian Philosophy 11 (2):61 – 71.
    It is often supposed that Confucianism is opposed to the idea of equality insofar as the key ideals to which it is committed, such as meritocracy and li , are incompatible with equality. Sympathetic commentators typically defend Confucianism by saying that (a) the Confucian person is not a free-standing individual but a social being embedded in a social structure with different and unequal roles, and (b) social inequality has to be traded in for other values. This paper argues (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  40.  19
    Confucianism, Rule‐Consequentialism, and the Demands of Filial Obligations.William Sin - 2019 - Journal of Religious Ethics 47 (2):377-393.
    Why should I take care of my aging parents? How far will morality require me to sacrifice for this cause? I will study these questions from the perspectives of Confucianism and rule‐consequentialism. Confucians believe that the continuity of families and the interactions between members of different generations can enhance the integrity of society in the long run. However, since Confucianism may impose extreme demands on its followers, this theory may be problematic. In this paper, I argue that despite (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  35
    Confucianism as an Ethical Foundation for Total Quality Management.Gavriel Meirovich & Edward J. Romar - 2004 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 23 (3):25-44.
  42.  9
    Understanding “Confucianism Becoming the Dominant School of Thought”.Fukagawa Maki - 2020 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 51 (2):123-139.
    Editor’sThis essay is a comprehensive review of the ‘jukyo kokkyoka’ controversy in Japanese academia. It introduces Japanese scholarship on the topic to the Chinese academic community and addresses critical remarks on the scholarly community’s research framework and the connotations of its terminology. Fukagawa also argues that the Japanese, the English, and the Chinese labels are all misleading. He therefore proposes to use the expression “Confucianism becoming the dominant school of thought.”.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  25
    Confucianism as Anthropological Machine.Eske Møllgaard - 2010 - Asian Philosophy 20 (2):127-140.
    Confucianism is a kind of humanism. Confucian humanism presupposes, however, a divisive act that separates human and nonhuman. This paper shows that the split between the human and the nonhuman is central to Mencius' moral psychology, and it argues that Confucianism is an anthropological machine in the sense of the term used by Giorgio Agamben. I consider the main points of early Daoist critique of Confucian humanism. A comparative analysis of Herman Melville's novella 'Bartleby the Scrivener' reveals the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  44.  29
    Confucianism and Human Rights.Wm Theodore de Bary & Tu Weiming (eds.) - 1998 - Columbia University Press.
    Is the Confucian tradition compatible with the Western understanding of human rights? Are there fundamental human values, regardless of cultural differences, common to all peoples of all nations? At this critical point in Communist China's history, eighteen distinguished scholars address the role of Confucianism in dealing with questions of universal human rights.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  45. Neo-Confucianism, experimental philosophy and the trouble with intuitive methods.Hagop Sarkissian - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (5):812-828.
    ABSTRACTThe proper role of intuitions in philosophy has been debated throughout its history, and especially since the turn of the twenty-first century. The context of this recent debate within analytic philosophy has been the heightened interest in intuitions as data points that need to be accommodated or explained away by philosophical theories. This, in turn, has given rise to a sceptical movement called experimental philosophy, whose advocates seek to understand the nature and reliability of such intuitions. Yet such scepticism of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  39
    Reconstructionist confucianism and health care: An asian moral account of health care resource allocation.Ruiping Fan - 2002 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (6):675 – 682.
    In this article, I offer an abridged reconstruction of the foundational elements of Confucian moral commitments, which, I will argue, still provide the background moral substance for moral reflection in mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, and Korea. The essay presents implications of Confucianism for establishing an appropriate health care system and critically assesses the features of current health polices in mainland China, Hong Kong, and Singapore. The goal is to offer a family-oriented, non-individualist account of resource allocation that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  47.  57
    Confucianism and Tokugawa culture.Peter Nosco (ed.) - 1997 - Honolulu, Hawaii: University of Hawai'i Press.
    ONE INTRODUCTION: NEO-CONFUCIANISM AND TOKUGAWA DISCOURSE BY PETER NOSCO Modern scholarship on the intellectual history of the Tokugawa period ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  48.  15
    Confucianism and Democratization in East Asia.Doh Chull Shin - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    For decades, scholars and politicians have vigorously debated whether Confucianism is compatible with democracy, yet little is known about how it affects the process of democratization in East Asia. In this book, Doh Chull Shin examines the prevalence of core Confucian legacies and their impacts on civic and political orientations in six Confucian countries: China, Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Taiwan, and Vietnam. Analyses of the Asian Barometer and World Values surveys reveal that popular attachment to Confucian legacies has mixed (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  49. Confucianism and Totalitarianism: An Arendtian Reconsideration of Mencius versus Xunzi.Lee Wilson - 2021 - Philosophy East and West 71 (4):981-1004.
    Totalitarianism is perhaps unanimously regarded as one of the greatest political evils of the last century and has been the grounds for much of Anglo-American political theory since. Confucianism, meanwhile, has been gaining credibility in the past decades among sympathizers of democratic theory in spite of criticisms of it being anti-democratic or authoritarian. I consider how certain key concepts in the classical Confucian texts of the Mencius and the Xunzi might or might not be appropriated for ‘legitimising’ totalitarian regimes. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  32
    Neo-Confucianism: Metaphysics, Mind, and Morality.JeeLoo Liu - 2017 - Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
    Solidly grounded in Chinese primary sources, Neo Confucianism: Metaphysics, Mind, and Morality engages the latest global scholarship to provide an innovative, rigorous, and clear articulation of neo-Confucianism and its application to Western philosophy. -/- Contextualizes neo-Confucianism for contemporary analytic philosophy by engaging with today’s philosophical questions and debates Based on the most recent and influential scholarship on neo-Confucianism, and supported by primary texts in Chinese and cross-cultural secondary literature Presents a cohesive analysis of neo-Confucianism by (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000