Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Philosophical Anthropology and the Interpersonal Theory of the Affect of Shame.Matthew Stewart Rukgaber - 2018 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 49 (1):83-112.
    This article argues that shame is fundamentally interpersonal. It is opposed to the leading interpretation of shame in the field of moral psychology, which is the cognitivist, morally rationally, autonomous view of shame as a negative judgment about the self. That view of shame abandons the social and interpersonal essence of shame. I will advance the idea, as developed by the tradition of philosophical anthropology and, in particular, in the works of Helmuth Plessner, Erwin Straus, F. J. J. Buytendijk, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Thinking and Feeling: A Buddhist Perspective.Padmasiri de Silva - 2011 - Sophia 50 (2):253-263.
    The work ‘Thinking and Feeling’ edited by Robert C. Solomon may be considered as a landmark in the history of the philosophy of the emotions. The work also has assembled together some of the best minds in the Anglo American Traditions. The central focus in this work is to mediate between the physiological arousal theories of emotions and the cognitive appraisal theories of emotions. My article is an attempt to mediate from my Asian background and in specific terms using the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Metaethical Problems for Ethical Egoism, Reconsidered.Benjamin Bayer - manuscript
    Until recently it has been conventional to assume that ethical egoism is "ethical" is name, alone, and that no account that considers one's own interests as the standard of moral obligation could count as seriously "ethical." In recent years, however, philosophers have shown increasing respect for more sophisticated forms of ethical egoism which attempt to define self-interest in enriched terms characterizing self-interest as human flourishing in both material and psychological dimensions. But philosophers are still skeptical that any conception of self-interest (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Desired Moral Attitude of the Physician: (I) Empathy. [REVIEW]Petra Gelhaus - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (2):103-113.
    In professional medical ethics, the physician traditionally is obliged to fulfil specific duties as well as to embody a responsible and trustworthy personality. In the public discussion, different concepts are suggested to describe the desired underlying attitude of physicians. In this article, one of them—empathy—is presented in an interpretation that is meant to depicture (together with the two additional concepts compassion and care) this attitude. Therefore empathy in the clinical context is defined as the adequate understanding of the inner processes (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Reason to Be Cheerful.Tom Cochrane - 2021 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 12 (2):311-327.
    This paper identifies a tension between the commitment to forming rationally justified emotions and the happy life. To illustrate this tension I begin with a critical evaluation of the positive psychology technique known as ‘gratitude training’. I argue that gratitude training is at odds with the kind of critical monitoring that several philosophers have claimed is regulative of emotional rationality. More generally, critical monitoring undermines exuberance, an attitude that plays a central role in contemporary models of the happy life. Thus, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Rationalities of Emotion–Defending, Distinguishing, Connecting.Sophie Rietti - 2009 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 16 (1):38-61.
    Claims that emotions are or can be rational, and crucially enabling of rationality, are now fairly common, also outside of philosophy, but with considerable diversity both in their assumptions about emotions and their conceptions of rationality. Three main trends are worth picking out, both in themselves and for the potential tensions between them: accounts that defend a case for the rationality of emotions A) by assimilating emotions closely to beliefs or judgements; B) in terms of the very features that traditional (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Can Non-Theists Appropriately Feel Existential Gratitude?Michael Lacewing - 2016 - Religious Studies 52 (2):145-165.
    Does it make sense for non-theists to feel gratitude for their existence? The question arises because gratitude is typically thought to be directed towards a person to whom one is grateful. Hence the theist may be grateful to God for their existence, experienced as a gift. But can the non-believer feel something similar without being irrational? Can there be gratitude for existence but not to anyone? After analysing gratitude and how we can best understand the idea of non-directed gratitude, I (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Shame and Philosophy: Michael L. Morgan , On Shame. London: Routledge Philip Hutchinson , Shame and Philosophy: An Investigation in the Philosophy of Emotions and Ethics. London: Palgrave Macmillan.Richard Paul Hamilton - 2010 - Res Publica 16 (4):431-439.
    Shame is a ubiquitous and highly intriguing feature of human experience. It can motivate but it can also paralyse. It is something which one can legitimately demand of another, but is not usually experienced as a choice. Perpetrators of atrocities can remain defiantly immune to shame while their victims are racked by it. It would be hard to understand any society or culture without understanding the characteristic occasions upon which shame is expected and where it is mitigated. Yet, one can (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Introduction: Virtue and Vice.Heather Battaly - 2010 - Metaphilosophy 41 (1-2):1-21.
    Abstract: This introduction to the collection Virtue and Vice, Moral and Epistemic addresses three main questions: (1) What is a virtue theory in ethics or epistemology? (2) What is a virtue? and (3) What is a vice? (1) It suggests that a virtue theory takes the virtues and vices of agents to be more fundamental than evaluations of acts or beliefs, and defines right acts or justified beliefs in terms of the virtues. (2) It argues that there are two important (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Feeling Without Thinking: Lessons From the Ancients on Emotion and Virtue-Acquisition.Amy Coplan - 2010 - Metaphilosophy 41 (1-2):132-151.
    By briefly sketching some important ancient accounts of the connections between psychology and moral education, I hope to illuminate the significance of the contemporary debate on the nature of emotion and to reveal its stakes. I begin the essay with a brief discussion of intellectualism in Socrates and the Stoics, and Plato's and Posidonius's respective attacks against it. Next, I examine the two current leading philosophical accounts of emotion: the cognitive theory and the noncognitive theory. I maintain that the noncognitive (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Moral Value of Envy.Krista K. Thomason - 2015 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):36-53.
    It is common to think that we would be morally better people if we never felt envy. Recently, some philosophers have rejected this conclusion by arguing that envy can often be directed toward unfairness or inequality. As such, they conclude that we should not suppress our feelings of envy. I argue, however, that these defenses only show that envy is sometimes morally permissible. In order to show that we would not be better off without envy, we must show how envy (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Cosmopolitan Anger and Shame.Joshua Hobbs - 2019 - Journal of Global Ethics 16 (1):58-76.
    Sentimental cosmopolitans argue that cultivating empathy for distant others is necessary in order to motivate action to address global injustices. This paper accepts the basic premises of the senti...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • On the Social Dimensions of Moral Psychology.John D. GreenwooD - 2011 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 41 (4):333-364.
    Contemporary moral psychology has been enormously enriched by recent theoretical developments and empirical findings in evolutionary biology, cognitive psychology and neuroscience, and social psychology and psychopathology. Yet despite the fact that some theorists have developed specifically “social heuristic” (Gigerenzer, 2008) and “social intuitionist” (Haidt, 2007) theories of moral judgment and behavior, and despite regular appeals to the findings of experimental social psychology, contemporary moral psychology has largely neglected the social dimensions of moral judgment and behavior. I provide a brief sketch (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • A Passionate Buddhist Life.Emily McRae - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (1):99-121.
    This paper addresses the ways that we can understand and transform our strong emotions and how this project contributes to moral and spiritual development. To this end, I choose to think with two Tibetan Buddhist thinkers, both of whom take up the question of how passionate emotions can fit into spiritual and moral life: the famous, playful yogin Shabkar Tsodruk Rangdrol (1781–1851) and the wandering, charismatic master Patrul Rinpoche (1808–1887). Shabkar's The Autobiography of Shabkar provides excellent examples of using one's (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Death as a Social Harm.Lori Gruen - 2014 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 52 (S1):53-65.
    Lately there has been increased attention to the philosophical issues that death raises, but the focus remains individualistic. Death is philosophically puzzling. Death is thought to be bad for the individual who dies, but there is no one there to experience death as a harm. In this paper I argue that the harm of death is a social harm. Of course, social relationships are fundamentally changed when any member of a social group dies. Death is harmful for those left behind. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Double Intentionality of Emotional Experience.Tom Cochrane - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):1454-1475.
    I argue that while the feeling of bodily responses is not necessary to emotion, these feelings contribute significant meaningful content to everyday emotional experience. Emotional bodily feelings represent a ‘state of self’, analysed as a sense of one's body affording certain patterns of interaction with the environment. Recognising that there are two sources of intentional content in everyday emotional experience allows us to reconcile the diverging intuitions that people have about emotional states, and to understand better the long-standing debate between (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • A Dispositional Theory of Love.Hichem Naar - 2013 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 94 (3):342-357.
    On a naive reading of the major accounts of love, love is a kind of mental event. A recent trend in the philosophical literature on love is to reject these accounts on the basis that they do not do justice to the historical dimension of love, as love essentially involves a distinctive kind of temporally extended pattern. Although the historicist account has advantages over the positions that it opposes, its appeal to the notion of a pattern is problematic. I will (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • Self-Deception About Emotion.Lisa Damm - 2011 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (3):254-270.
    In this paper, I address an ignored topic in the literature on self-deception—instances in which one is self-deceived about their emotions. Most discussions of emotion and self-deception address either the contributory role of emotion to instances of self-deception involving beliefs or assume what I argue is an outdated view of emotion according to which emotions just are beliefs or some other type of propositional attitude. In order to construct an account of self-deception about emotion, I draw a distinction between two (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Aeschynē in Aristotle's Conception of Human Nature.Melissa Marie Coakley - unknown
    This dissertation provides a thorough examination of the role of aeschynē in Aristotle’s conception of human nature by illuminating the political and ethical implications of shame and shamelessness and the effect of these implications in his treatises. It is crucial, both to one’s own personhood and eudaimonia as well as to the existence of a just and balanced state, that aeschynē be understood and respected because of the self-evaluating ability that it maintains. The aim of this work is to show (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Organic Intimacy: Emotional Practices at an Organic Store.Jón Þór Pétursson - 2018 - Agriculture and Human Values 35 (3):581-594.
    The article tells the story of the rise and fall of the organic store Yggdrasill in Iceland. That story features humble founders, caring customers, dedicated staff, as well as anonymous investment funds, and it describes the conversion of organics from a niche market to mainstream consumption. Through an ethnographic account of everyday life at the organic store, the article analyzes how intimacy within the modern food chain is established through emotional practices. Staff and customers share feelings of reciprocity, not only (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Extending the Extended Mind: The Case for Extended Affectivity.Giovanna Colombetti & Tom Roberts - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (5):1243-1263.
    The thesis of the extended mind (ExM) holds that the material underpinnings of an individual’s mental states and processes need not be restricted to those contained within biological boundaries: when conditions are right, material artefacts can be incorporated by the thinking subject in such a way as to become a component of her extended mind. Up to this point, the focus of this approach has been on phenomena of a distinctively cognitive nature, such as states of dispositional belief, and processes (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  • Emotion, the Bodily, and the Cognitive.Rick Anthony Furtak - 2010 - Philosophical Explorations 13 (1):51 – 64.
    In both psychology and philosophy, cognitive theories of emotion have met with increasing opposition in recent years. However, this apparent controversy is not so much a gridlock between antithetical stances as a critical debate in which each side is being forced to qualify its position in order to accommodate the other side of the story. Here, I attempt to sort out some of the disagreements between cognitivism and its rivals, adjudicating some disputes while showing that others are merely superficial. Looking (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • On Being Attached.Monique Wonderly - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (1):223-242.
    We often use the term “attachment” to describe our emotional connectedness to objects in the world. We become attached to our careers, to our homes, to certain ideas, and perhaps most importantly, to other people. Interestingly, despite its import and ubiquity in our everyday lives, the topic of attachment per se has been largely ignored in the philosophy literature. I address this lacuna by identifying attachment as a rich “mode of mattering” that can help to inform certain aspects of agency (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • The Other From an Educational Perspective: Beyond Fear, Dependence.Miriam Prieto - 2015 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (3):297-309.
    In this article I explore the implications of the educational use of diversity in current discourse and practice. I argue that the current recognition of differences through the emphasis on social identity is just the continuity of the logic that traditionally has responded to otherness through suppression or possession. The central idea is that the category of diversity, even if it is used in the educational sphere as a purveyor of recognition of otherness, hides in reality a fear of the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On Music’s Subtle Expressiveness.Myriam Albor - 2016 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 7 (1):37-65.
    I suggest that emotions are not the primary affective attitude towards music. If we are to explain music’s expressiveness according to the Resemblance Theory, that theory should be extended to include feelings. Because of the lack of intentionality in music and the dearth of universal emotional gestures to explain the subtlety of music’s expressive power, explaining this expressiveness by making recourse to music’s relationships with emotions is bound to face challenges. I will argue that, even though the movements in music (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Emoce: Primitivní a Kognitivní Složka.Michal Polák - 2012 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 19:180-198.
    No categories
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Self and Its Emotions.Frances Bottenberg - 2013 - Philosophical Psychology 26 (3):480-484.
  • Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Janet Etzi - 2007 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 38 (2):284-287.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On Emotions: Philosophical Essays.Aaron Kagan - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (5):742-746.
  • Emotional Intelligence and Moral Agency: Some Worries and a Suggestion.Sophie Rietti - 2009 - Philosophical Psychology 22 (2):143 – 165.
    Emotional intelligence (EI) has been put forward as a distinctive kind of intelligence and, by popularizers such as Daniel Goleman, as an indicator of moral and life skills. Critics, however, have been concerned EI-testing measures conformity or the ability to manipulate own or others' emotions, and relies on a problematic assumption that there are definitive, universal “right” answers when it comes to feelings. Such worries have also been raised about the original concept developed by Peter Salovey and John D. Mayer; (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation