Results for 'Velma Newton'

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  1. Lawyers, Should Thou Advertise?: A Bibliography of Materials on Legal Ethics and Lawyer Advertising.Velma Newton - 1982 - Faculty of Law Library, University of the West Indies.
     
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  2. Isaac Newton's Papers and Letters on Natural Philosophy.Isaac Newton, I. Bernard Cohen & Robert E. Schofield - 1959 - Science and Society 23 (3):279-282.
     
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  3. The Correspondence of Isaac Newton.Isaac Newton & H. W. Turnbull - 1961 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 12 (47):255-258.
     
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  4.  58
    Newton's Philosophy of Nature: Selections From His Writings.Isaac Newton - 1953 - Dover Publications.
    Aside from the Principia and occasional appearances of the Opticks , Newton' writings have remained largely inaccessible to students of philosophy, science, and literature as well as to other readers. This book provides a remedy with wide representation of the interests, problems, and diverse philosophic issues that preoccupied the greatest scientific mind of the seventeenth century. Grouped in sections corresponding to methods, principles, and theological considerations, these selections feature explanatory notes and cross-references to related essays.
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  5. Isaac Newton.Ivo Schneider, Kolumban Hutter, Isaac Newton & Friedrich Steinle - 1993 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 24 (1):169-185.
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  6. The Correspondence of Isaac Newton.A. Rupert Hall, Isaac Newton & Laura Tilling - 1979 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 30 (2):173-177.
     
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  7. Unpublished Scientific Papers of Isaac Newton.Isaac Newton, A. Rupert Hall & Marie Boas Hall - 1963 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 13 (52):344-345.
     
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  8.  35
    Newton's Astronomical Apprenticeship: Notes of 1664/5.J. Mcguire, Martin Tamny & Isaac Newton - 1985 - Isis 76:349-365.
  9.  32
    Newton on Rotating Bodies.J. W. Herivel & Isaac Newton - 1962 - Isis 53 (2):212-218.
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  10. Professor Newton CA da Costa Awarded Nicholas Copernicus University Medal of Merit.Newton C. A. da Costa, Jean-Yves Béziau & Otávio Bueno - 1999 - Logic and Logical Philosophy 7:7-10.
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  11.  17
    Newton on Rotating Bodies.J. Herivel & Isaac Newton - 1962 - Isis 53:212-218.
  12.  15
    Newton's Clavis as Starkey's Key.William Newman & Isaac Newton - 1987 - Isis 78:564-574.
  13. Franklin and Newton an Inquiry Into Speculative Newtonian Experimental Science and Franklin's Work in Electricity as an Example Thereof.I. Bernard Cohen, Isaac Newton & Benjamin Franklin - 1956 - American Philosophical Society.
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  14. The Correspondence of Isaac Newton, Vol. IV: 1694-1709.J. F. Scott & Isaac Newton - 1968 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 19 (3):268-269.
     
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  15.  13
    Newton's Clavis as Starkey's Key.William Newman & Issac Newton - 1987 - Isis 78 (4):564-574.
  16. The Compass of Philosophy an Essay in Intellectual Orientation [by] Newton P. Stallknecht [and] Robert S. Brumbaugh.Newton Phelps Stallknecht & Robert Sherrick Brumbaugh - 1954 - Longmans, Green.
     
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  17. The Spirit of Western Philosophy a Historical Interpretation Including Selections From the Major European Philosophers [by] Newton P. Stallknecht [and] Robert S. Brumbaugh.Newton Phelps Stallknecht & Robert Sherrick Brumbaugh - 1964 - D. Mckay Co.
     
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  18. The Correspondence of Isaac Newton. Vol. III: 1688-1694.Isaac Newton & H. W. Turnbull - 1963 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 13 (52):332-334.
     
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  19. Newton and the Reality of Force.Andrew Janiak - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):127-147.
    : Newton's critics argued that his treatment of gravity in the Principia saddles him with a substantial dilemma. If he insists that gravity is a real force, he must invoke action at a distance because of his explicit failure to characterize the mechanism underlying gravity. To avoid distant action, however, he must admit that gravity is not a real force, and that he has therefore failed to discover the actual cause of the phenomena associated with it. A reinterpretation of (...)
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  20. The Mathematical Papers of Isaac Newton, Volume VIII: 1697-1722.D. T. Whiteside & Isaac Newton - 1984 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 35 (3):303-307.
     
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  21.  38
    The Blue and Brown Books.Newton Garver - 1961 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 21 (4):576-577.
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  22.  54
    Newton as Philosopher.Andrew Janiak - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    Newton's philosophical views are unique and uniquely difficult to categorise. In the course of a long career from the early 1670s until his death in 1727, he articulated profound responses to Cartesian natural philosophy and to the prevailing mechanical philosophy of his day. Newton as Philosopher presents Newton as an original and sophisticated contributor to natural philosophy, one who engaged with the principal ideas of his most important predecessor, René Descartes, and of his most influential critic, G. (...)
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  23.  4
    Epistemic anxiety and epistemic risk.Lilith Newton - 2022 - Synthese 200 (4):1-23.
    In this paper, I provide an account of epistemic anxiety as an emotional response to epistemic risk: the risk of believing in error. The motivation for this account is threefold. First, it makes epistemic anxiety a species of anxiety, thus rendering psychologically respectable a notion that has heretofore been taken seriously only by epistemologists. Second, it illuminates the relationship between anxiety and risk. It is standard in psychology to conceive of anxiety as a response to risk, but psychologists – very (...)
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  24.  64
    Popper, Science and Rationality: W. H. Newton-Smith.W. H. Newton-Smith - 1995 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 39:13-30.
    We all think that science is special. Its products—its technological spin-off—dominate our lives which are thereby sometimes enriched and sometimes impoverished but always affected. Even the most outlandish critics of science such as Feyerabend implicitly recognize its success. Feyerabend told us that science was a congame. Scientists had so successfully hood-winked us into adopting its ideology that other equally legitimate forms of activity—alchemy, witchcraft and magic—lost out. He conjured up a vision of much enriched lives if only we could free (...)
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  25. Paradise Regain'd, a Poem. To Which is Added Samson Agonistes: And Poems Upon Several Occasions. From the Text of T. Newton[REVIEW]John Milton & Thomas Newton - 1758
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  26. Newton's Regulae Philosophandi.Zvi Biener - 2018 - In Chris Smeenk & Eric Schliesser (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Isaac Newton. Oxford University Press.
    Newton’s Regulae philosophandi—the rules for reasoning in natural philosophy—are maxims of causal reasoning and induction. This essay reviews their significance for Newton’s method of inquiry, as well as their application to particular propositions within the Principia. Two main claims emerge. First, the rules are not only interrelated, they defend various facets of the same core idea: that nature is simple and orderly by divine decree, and that, consequently, human beings can be justified in inferring universal causes from limited (...)
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  27.  15
    Isaac Newton's Scientific Method: Turning Data Into Evidence About Gravity and Cosmology.William L. Harper - 2011 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Isaac Newton's Scientific Method examines Newton's argument for universal gravity and his application of it to resolve the problem of deciding between geocentric and heliocentric world systems by measuring masses of the sun and planets. William L. Harper suggests that Newton's inferences from phenomena realize an ideal of empirical success that is richer than prediction. Any theory that can achieve this rich sort of empirical success must not only be able to predict the phenomena it purports to (...)
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  28. Newton on Active and Passive Quantities of Matter.Adwait A. Parker - 2020 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 84:1-11.
    Newton published his deduction of universal gravity in Principia (first ed., 1687). To establish the universality (the particle-to-particle nature) of gravity, Newton must establish the additivity of mass. I call ‘additivity’ the property a body's quantity of matter has just in case, if gravitational force is proportional to that quantity, the force can be taken to be the sum of forces proportional to each particle's quantity of matter. Newton's argument for additivity is obscure. I analyze and assess (...)
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  29. Paradise Lost, a Poem. From the Text of T. Newton.John Milton & Thomas Newton - 1758
     
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  30. George Eliot, Romantic Humanist a Study of the Philosophical Structure of Her Novels /K.M. Newton. --. --.K. M. Newton - 1981 - Barnes & Noble Books, 1981.
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  31. I NTRODUCCIÓN M ucha gente tiende a pensar que con la teoría de la relatividad de Einstein, el concepto de tiempo absoluto de Isaac Newton quedó totalmente refutado. 1 En este trabajo nos proponemos explorar la idea de que, al.Einstein Y. La Noción De Newton - 2001 - Signos Filosóficos 5:65-81.
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  32. Principes mathématiques de la philosophie naturelle, t. I, Préfaces, suivies des Livres 1 et 2 de Newton : Du Mouvement des Corps, t. II : Livre 3 de Newton : Du système du monde. [REVIEW]Isaac Newton & Marquise du Chastellet - 1968 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 73 (3):378-382.
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  33.  12
    Newton and Empiricism.Zvi Biener & Eric Schliesser (eds.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    This is the first volume of original commissioned papers on the subject of Newton and empiricism. The chapters, contributed by a leading team of both established and younger international scholars, explore the nature and extent of Newton's relationship to a variety of empiricisms and empiricists.
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  34.  7
    The Principia: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy.Isaac Newton - 1999 - University of California Press.
    Presents Newton's unifying idea of gravitation and explains how he converted physics from a science of explanation into a general mathematical system.
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  35. Velma Bourgeois Richmond, The Legend of Guy of Warwick. (Garland Studies in Medieval Literature, 14; Garland Reference Library of the Humanities, 1929.) New York and London: Garland, 1996. Pp. Xv, 551; Black-and-White Frontispiece and 75 Black-and-White Illustrations. $95. [REVIEW]Joanne A. Charbonneau - 1998 - Speculum 73 (4):1165-1167.
     
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  36.  27
    On the Theory of Inconsistent Formal Systems.Newton C. A. Costa - 1972 - Recife, Universidade Federal De Pernambuco, Instituto De Matemática.
  37.  83
    Rethinking Newton’s Principia.Simon Saunders - 2013 - Philosophy of Science 80 (1):22-48.
    It is widely accepted that the notion of an inertial frame is central to Newtonian mechanics and that the correct space-time structure underlying Newton’s methods in Principia is neo-Newtonian or Galilean space-time. I argue to the contrary that inertial frames are not needed in Newton’s theory of motion, and that the right space-time structure for Newton’s Principia requires the notion of parallelism of spatial directions at different times and nothing more. Only relative motions are definable in this (...)
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  38.  95
    Newton’s Substance Monism, Distant Action, and the Nature of Newton’s Empiricism: Discussion of H. Kochiras “Gravity and Newton’s Substance Counting Problem”.Eric Schliesser - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):160-166.
    This paper is a critical response to Hylarie Kochiras’ “Gravity and Newton’s substance counting problem,” Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 40 267–280. First, the paper argues that Kochiras conflates substances and beings; it proceeds to show that Newton is a substance monist. The paper argues that on methodological grounds Newton has adequate resources to respond to the metaphysical problems diagnosed by Kochiras. Second, the paper argues against the claim that Newton is committed to two (...)
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  39.  31
    Newton’s Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica "Jesuit" Edition: The Tenor of a Huge Work.Raffaele Pisano & Paolo Bussotti - 2014 - Rendiconti Accademia Dei Lincei Matematica E Applicazioni 25 (4):413-444.
    This paper has the aim to provide a general view of the so called Jesuit Edition (hereafter JE) of Newton’s Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (1739–1742). This edition was conceived to explain all Newton’s methods through an apparatus of notes and commentaries. Every Newton’s proposition is annotated. Because of this, the text – in four volumes – is one of the most important documents to understand Newton’s way of reasoning. This edition is well known, but systematic works (...)
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  40. Newton’s Challenge to Philosophy: A Programmatic Essay.Eric Schliesser - 2011 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 1 (1):101-128.
    I identify a set of interlocking views that became (and still are) very influential within philosophy in the wake of Newton’s success. These views use the authority of natural philosophy/mechanics to settle debates within philosophy. I label these “Newton’s Challenge.”.
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  41.  6
    The Role of Interests in Science: W. Newton-Smith.W. Newton-Smith - 1984 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 18:59-73.
    A series of lectures organized in part by the Society for Applied Philosophy and entitled ‘Philosophy and Practice’ is presumably aimed at displaying the practical implications of philosophical doctrines and/or applying philosophical skills to practical questions. The topic of this paper, the role of interests in science, certainly meets the first condition. For as will be argued there are a number of theses concerning the role of interests in science which have considerable implications for how one should see the scientific (...)
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  42.  22
    The Philosophy of Logic of Francisco Miró Quesada Cantuarias.Newton da Costa, José Carlos Cifuentes & Luis Felipe Bartolo Alegre - 2020 - South American Journal of Logic 6 (2):189-208.
    In this historical article, Newton da Costa discusses Francisco Miró Quesada’s philosophical ideas about logic. He discusses the topics of reason, logic, and action in Miró Quesada’s work, and in the final section he offers his critical view. In particular, he disagrees with Miró Quesada’s stance on the historicity of reason, for whom “reason is essentially absolute”, whereas for da Costa it “is being constructed in the course of history”. Da Costa concludes by emphasizing the importance of Miró Quesada’s (...)
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  43. Newton's Ontology of Omnipresence and Infinite Space.J. E. McGuire & Edward Slowik - 2013 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 6:279-308.
    This essay explores the role of God’s omnipresence in Newton’s natural philosophy, with special emphasis placed on how God is related to space. Unlike Descartes’ conception, which denies the spatiality of God, or Gassendi and Charleton’s view, which regards God as completely whole in every part of space, it is argued that Newton accepts spatial extension as a basic aspect of God’s omnipresence. The historical background to Newton’s spatial ontology assumes a large part of our investigation, but (...)
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  44.  1
    Isaac Newton's Scientific Method: Turning Data Into Evidence About Gravity and Cosmology.William L. Harper - 2011 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Isaac Newton's Scientific Method examines Newton's argument for universal gravity and his application of it to resolve the problem of deciding between geocentric and heliocentric world systems by measuring masses of the sun and planets. William L. Harper suggests that Newton's inferences from phenomena realize an ideal of empirical success that is richer than prediction. Any theory that can achieve this rich sort of empirical success must not only be able to predict the phenomena it purports to (...)
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  45. Newton's Scaffolding: The Instrumental Roles of His Optical Hypotheses.Kirsten Walsh - 2019 - In Peter R. Anstey & Alberto Vanzo (eds.), Experiment, Speculation and Religion in Early Modern Philosophy. New York: Routledge.
    Early modern experimental philosophers often appear to commit to and utilise corpuscular and mechanical hypotheses. This is somewhat mysterious, for such hypotheses frequently appear to be simply assumed, which is odd for a research program which emphasises the careful experimental accumulation of facts. Isaac Newton was one such experimental philosopher, and his optical work is considered a clear example of the experimental method. Focusing on his optical investigations, Walsh identifies three roles for hypotheses. First, Newton introduces a hypothesis (...)
     
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  46.  44
    Opticks.Isaac Newton - 1704 - Dover Press.
    Reproduces the text of Newton's dissertation on the nature and properties of light.
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  47.  12
    Newton's Principia for the Common Reader.S. Chandrasekhar - 1995 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Newton's Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica provides a coherent and deductive presentation of his discovery of the universal law of gravitation. It is very much more than a demonstration that 'to us it is enough that gravity really does exist and act according to the laws which we have explained and abundantly serves to account for all the motions of the celestial bodies and the sea'. It is important to us as a model of all mathematical physics.Representing a decade's work (...)
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  48. Newton and Wolff: The Leibnizian Reaction to the Principia, 1716-1763.Marius Stan - 2012 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (3):459-481.
    Newton rested his theory of mechanics on distinct metaphysical and epistemological foundations. After Leibniz's death in 1716, the Principia ran into sharp philosophical opposition from Christian Wolff and his disciples, who sought to subvert Newton's foundations or replace them with Leibnizian ideas. In what follows, I chronicle some of the Wolffians' reactions to Newton's notion of absolute space, his dynamical laws of motion, and his general theory of gravitation. I also touch on arguments advanced by Newton's (...)
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  49.  74
    Huey Newton's Lessons for the Academic Left.Jim Vernon - forthcoming - Theory, Culture and Society.
    The Black Panther Party was founded to bridge the radical theorizing that swept college campuses in the mid-1960s and the lumpen proletariat abandoned by the so-called ‘Great Society’. However, shortly thereafter, Newton began to harshly criticize the academic Left in general for their drive to find ‘a set of actions and a set of principles that are easy to identify and are absolute.’ This article reconstructs Newton’s critique of progressive movements grounded primarily in academic debates, as well as (...)
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  50. Newton’s Neo-Platonic Ontology of Space.Edward Slowik - 2013 - Foundations of Science 18 (3):419-448.
    This paper investigates Newton’s ontology of space in order to determine its commitment, if any, to both Cambridge neo-Platonism, which posits an incorporeal basis for space, and substantivalism, which regards space as a form of substance or entity. A non-substantivalist interpretation of Newton’s theory has been famously championed by Howard Stein and Robert DiSalle, among others, while both Stein and the early work of J. E. McGuire have downplayed the influence of Cambridge neo-Platonism on various aspects of (...)’s own spatial hypotheses. Both of these assertions will be shown to be problematic on various grounds, with special emphasis placed on Stein’s influential case for a non-substantivalist reading. Our analysis will strive, nonetheless, to reveal the unique or forward-looking aspects of Newton’s approach, most notably, his critical assessment of substance ontologies, that help to distinguish his theory of space from his neo-Platonic contemporaries and predecessors. (shrink)
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