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  1. Virtue Ethics.Rosalind Hursthouse & Glen Pettigrove - 2022 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Virtue ethics is currently one of three major approaches in normative ethics. It may, initially, be identified as the one that emphasizes the virtues, or moral character, in contrast to the approach that emphasizes duties or rules (deontology) or that emphasizes the consequences of actions (consequentialism). Suppose it is obvious that someone in need should be helped. A utilitarian will point to the fact that the consequences of doing so will maximize well-being, a deontologist to the fact that, in doing (...)
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  2. On Virtue Ethics.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1999 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Virtue ethics is perhaps the most important development within late twentieth-century moral philosophy. Rosalind Hursthouse, who has made notable contributions to this development, here presents a full exposition and defense of her neo-Aristotelian version of virtue ethics. She shows how virtue ethics can provide guidance for action, illuminate moral dilemmas, and bring out the moral significance of the emotions.
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  3. Virtue Theory and Abortion.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1991 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 20 (3):223-246.
    The sort of ethical theory derived from Aristotle, variously described as virtue ethics, virtue-based ethics, or neo-Aristotelianism, is becoming better known, and is now quite widely recognized as at least a possible rival to deontological and utilitarian theories. With recognition has come criticism, of varying quality. In this article I shall discuss nine separate criticisms that I have frequently encountered, most of which seem to me to betray an inadequate grasp either of the structure of virtue theory or of what (...)
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  4. Arational actions.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1991 - Journal of Philosophy 88 (2):57-68.
    According to the standard account of actions and their explanations, intentional actions are actions done because the agent has a certain desire/belief pair that explains the action by rationalizing it. Any explanation of intentional action in terms of an appetite or occurrent emotion is hence assumed to be elliptical, implicitly appealing to some appropriate belief. In this paper, I challenge this assumption with respect to the " arational " actions of my title---a significant subset of the set of intentional actions (...)
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  5.  27
    Virtue Theory and Abortion.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1997 - In Roger Crisp & Michael Slote (eds.), Virtue Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    The sort of ethical theory derived from Aristotle, variously described as virtue ethics, virtue-based ethics, or neo-Aristotelianism, is becoming better known, and is now quite widely recognized as at least a possible rival to deontological and utilitarian theories. With recognition has come criticism, of varying quality. In this article I shall discuss nine separate criticisms that I have frequently encountered, most of which seem to me to betray an inadequate grasp either of the structure of virtue theory or of what (...)
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  6. Virtue Ethics and the Treatment of Animals.Rosalind Hursthouse - 2011 - In Beauchamp Tom & Frey R. G. (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Animal Ethics,. Oxford University Press.
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  7. Practical wisdom: A mundane account.Rosalind Hursthouse - 2006 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 106 (3):283–307.
    The prevailing accounts of Aristotle's view of practical wisdom pay little attention to all the intellectual capacities discussed in Nicomachean Ethics Book 6. They also contrast the phronimos with the wicked, the continent or the incontinent, rather than with those who have 'natural virtue' (innate or habituated), and thereby they neglect the importance of experience, through which those capacities are acquired. When we consider them, we can see what sort of experience is needed and hence what sort aspirants to full (...)
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  8. Applying virtue ethics.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1995 - In Rosalind Hursthouse, Gavin Lawrence & Warren Quinn (eds.), Virtues and Reasons: Philippa Foot and Moral Theory: Essays in Honour of Philippa Foot. Oxford: Clarendon Press. pp. 57--75.
     
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  9. Environmental virtue ethics.Rosalind Hursthouse - 2007 - In Rebecca L. Walker & Philip J. Ivanhoe (eds.), Working virtue: virtue ethics and contemporary moral problems. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 155--172.
  10. The central doctrine of the mean.Rosalind Hursthouse - 2006 - In Richard Kraut (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 96--115.
    The prelims comprise: The Doctrine of the Mean outside Aristotle's Ethical Works The “Mean” in Action and Feeling The Central Doctrine of the Mean Virtue as a Mean Disposition and the Moral Education of the Passions Acknowledgments References Further reading.
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  11. IV*—A False Doctrine of the Mean.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1981 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 81 (1):57-72.
    Rosalind Hursthouse; IV*—A False Doctrine of the Mean, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Volume 81, Issue 1, 1 June 1981, Pages 57–72, https://doi.org/10.
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  12. Human Nature and Aristotelian Virtue Ethics.Rosalind Hursthouse - 2012 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 70:169-188.
    Given that it relies on claims about human nature, has Aristotelian virtue ethics been undermined by evolutionary biology? There are at least four objections which are offered in support of the claim that this is so, and I argue that they all fail. The first two maintain that contemporary AVE relies on a concept of human nature which evolutionary biology has undercut and I show this is not so. In Part 2, I try to make it clear that Foot's Aristotelian (...)
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  13. Ethics, Humans and Other Animals: An Introduction with Readings.Rosalind Hursthouse - 2000 - New York: Routledge.
    This introductory textbook is ideally suited to newcomers to philosophy and ethical problems. Rosalind Hursthouse carefully introduces the three standard approaches in current ethical theory: utilitarianism, rights, and virtue ethics. She links each chapter to readings from key exponents such as Peter Singer and Mary Midgley and asks students to think critically about these readings for themselves. Key features include clear activities and activities, chapter summaries and guides to further reading.
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  14. Environmental Virtue Ethics.Rosalind Hursthouse - 2006 - In Rebecca L. Walker & Philip J. Ivanhoe (eds.), Working Virtue: Virtue Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems. New York: Oxford University Press UK.
  15. Are virtues the proper starting point for morality?Rosalind Hursthouse - 2006 - In James Lawrence Dreier (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Moral Theory. Blackwell. pp. 99--112.
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  16. Virtue Ethics and Human Nature.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1999 - Hume Studies 25 (1):67-82.
    In this paper, I begin by outlining some basic features of the version of virtue ethics I espouse, and then turn to exploring what light may be shed on our understanding and interpretation of Hume when he is viewed from that perspective.
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  17. Virtues and Reasons: Philippa Foot and Moral Theory: Essays in Honour of Philippa Foot.Rosalind Hursthouse, Gavin Lawrence & Warren Quinn (eds.) - 1995 - Oxford: Clarendon Press.
    Philippa Foot is one of the most original and widely respected philosophers of our time; her work has exerted a lasting influence on the development of moral philosophy. In tribute to her, twelve leading philosophers from both sides of the Atlantic have contributed essays exploring the various topics in moral philosophy to which she has made a distinctive contribution--virtue ethics, naturalism, non-cognitivism, relativism, categorical requirements, and the role of rationality in morality.
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  18.  26
    Neo-Aristotelian Ethical Naturalism.Rosalind Hursthouse - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Hoboken, NJ: Blackwell.
    The proponents of neo-Aristotelian ethical naturalism (henceforth “Aristotelian naturalism” for short) include Foot (2001), Geach (1956, 1977), Hursthouse (1999), McDowell (1995), MacIntyre (1999), Nussbaum (1993, 1995), and Thompson (1995); and also Anscombe because her work has influenced so many others. (Gaut [1997, 2002] should also be known as a significant contributor.) Their views are so unlike those of other proponents of ethical naturalism (see Naturalism, Ethical), and they occupy such an unfamiliar position in philosophy, that they are simultaneously criticized on (...)
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  19. Normative Virtue Ethics.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1996 - In Roger Crisp (ed.), How Should One Live?: Essays on the Virtues. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 19-33.
     
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  20. Moral habituation.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1988 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 6:201-19.
  21.  24
    Two Ways of Doing the Right Thing.Rosalind Hursthouse - 2008 - In Colin Patrick Farrelly & Lawrence Solum (eds.), Virtue jurisprudence. Palgrave-Macmillan.
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  22.  15
    Virtue Theory and Abortion.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1997 - In Daniel Statman (ed.), Virtue Ethics: A Critical Reader. Edinburgh University Press. pp. 227-244.
    The sort of ethical theory derived from Aristotle, variously described as virtue ethics, virtue-based ethics, or neo-Aristotelianism, is becoming better known, and is now quite widely recognized as at least a possible rival to deontological and utilitarian theories. With recognition has come criticism, of varying quality. In this article I shall discuss nine separate criticisms that I have frequently encountered, most of which seem to me to betray an inadequate grasp either of the structure of virtue theory or of what (...)
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  23.  87
    Plato on Commensurability and Desire.Martha C. Nussbaum & Rosalind Hursthouse - 1984 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 58 (1):55 - 96.
  24. Virtue Ethics vs. Rule-Consequentialism: A Reply to Brad Hooker: Rosalind Hursthouse.Rosalind Hursthouse - 2002 - Utilitas 14 (1):41-53.
    In On Virtue Ethics I offered a criterion for a character trait's being a virtue according to which a virtuous character trait must conduce to, or at least not be inimical to, four ends, one of which is the continuance of the human species. I argue here that this does not commit me to homosexuality's being a vice, since homosexuality is not a character trait and hence not up for assessment as a virtue or a vice. Vegetarianism is not up (...)
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  25.  62
    On the Grounding of the Virtues in Human Nature.Rosalind Hursthouse - 2004 - In Matthias Lutz-Bachmann & Jan Szaif (eds.), Was Ist Das Für den Menschen Gute? / What is Good for a Human Being?: Menschliche Natur Und Güterlehre / Human Nature and Values. Walter de Gruyter.
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  26.  65
    Virtue Ethics and the Emotions.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1997 - In Daniel Statman (ed.), Virtue Ethics: A Critical Reader. Edinburgh University Press. pp. 99-117.
  27. A cting and Feeling in Character: Nicomachean Ethics 3.i.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1984 - Phronesis 29 (3):252-266.
  28.  95
    Fallacies and moral dilemmas.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1995 - Argumentation 9 (4):617-632.
    The continuing debate between utilitarians and deontologists often takes the form of disagreement over how particular moral dilemmas are to be resolved, but protagonists on both sides tend to overlook the possibility of resolving a dilemma “with remainder”, such as regret. The importance of “remainder” is also overlooked by critics of some “absolutist” ways of resolving or slipping between the horns of certain moral dilemmas. Moreover, deontologists, if not utilitarians, can be criticised for overlooking the possibility that, according to their (...)
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  29. Philippa Ruth Foot (Bosanquet, 1939).Rosalind Hursthouse - 2011 - Somerville College Report 1011:81-83.
    Very soon after Philippa Foot’s death, there was a flood of newspaper obituaries and ‘posts’ on blogs referring to her as one of the greatest moral philosophers of the twentieth century. She was also, though very few of the writers were in a position to say so, a particularly loyal Somervillian. She read PPE at Somerville during the war, started teaching there after war work in London in 1947, became its first Philosophy Tutorial Fellow in 1949, Vice Principal in 1967, (...)
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  30. Théorie de la vertu et avortement.Rosalind Hursthouse - 2012 - Repha 5.
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  31.  27
    The Grammar of Goodness in Foot’s Ethical Naturalism.Rosalind Hursthouse - 2018 - In John Hacker-Wright (ed.), Philippa Foot on Goodness and Virtue. Springer Verlag. pp. 25-46.
    This essay treats the development of Foot’s efforts to produce a naturalistic theory of moral judgement from her early “Moral Beliefs” to her 2001 book Natural Goodness. Although she consistently attempts to isolate and defend a notion of goodness that is grounded in goodness in living things, she is not attempting to get ethics out of biology, especially not evolutionary biology: “species/life-form” in her and Thompson is the everyday concept not the specialised evolutionary theory one. She is just making a (...)
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  32. Foot, Philippa Ruth, 1920-2010.Rosalind Hursthouse - 2012 - Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the British Academy Xi.
    PHILIPPA RUTH FOOT was born on 3 October 1920, the second daughter of William Bosanquet, who had done mathematics at Cambridge and became the manager of a steelworks in Yorkshire, and Esther Cleveland, daughter of President Grover Cleveland. She was educated mainly at home in the country by governesses, and not well. She said, many years later, that, ‘unsurprisingly’, she had been left ‘extremely ignorant’, and when the last one, ‘who actually had a degree’, suggested to her that she should (...)
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  33. Emotional Reason: Deliberation, Motivation and the Nature of Value. [REVIEW]Rosalind Hursthouse - 2002 - Mind 111 (442):418-422.
    This book has an ambitious aim—to make convincing the rejection of the hard and fast cognitive–conative divide currently so prevalent in philosophy of mind and moral psychology. Only such a rejection, Helm believes, can solve—or dissolve—the two major problems of practical reason. The ‘motivational problem’ is ‘a puzzle about the connection between our choosing something as the outcome of deliberation and our being motivated to pursue it’ (p. 1); the ‘deliberative problem’ concerns ‘how deliberation about value is possible’ (p. 11) (...)
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  34. Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1986 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 20:35-53.
    Our understanding of the moral philosophy of Aristotle is hampered by a number of modern assumptions we make about the subject. For a start, we are accustomed to thinking about ethics or moral philosophy as being concerned with theoretical questions about actions—what makes an action right or wrong? Modern moral philosophy gives two different sorts of answers to this question. One is in terms of a substantial ethical theory—what makes an action right or wrong is whether it promotes the greatest (...)
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  35.  27
    The Virtuous Agent's Reasons: A Response to Williams.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1995 - In Robert Heinaman (ed.), Aristotle and Moral Realism. Westview Press.
  36.  6
    Plato on the Emotions.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1984 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 58:81-96.
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  37.  9
    Moral Status.Rosalind Hursthouse - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Hoboken, NJ: Blackwell.
    The concept of moral status has developed from three initially independent philosophical discussions that became prominent in the 1970s. It figured in the three in rather different ways, which explains why the current concept has some of the vagaries that it has.
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  38. Aristotle for women who love too much.Rosalind Hursthouse - 2007 - Ethics 117 (2):327-334.
  39.  44
    The Uses and Abuses of Argument.Introduction to Philosophy.Key Concepts.Work, Morality and Human Nature.Oswald Hanfling, Rosalind Hursthouse & Stuart Brown - 1981 - Philosophical Quarterly 31 (123):184-187.
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  40.  9
    Aristotle: Ethics.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1979 - Open University Press.
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  41. Action, Emotion and Motive.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1975 - Dissertation, Oxford University
  42.  50
    An Interview with Rosalind Hursthouse: Philosophy in the Open University.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1998 - Cogito 12 (1):5-10.
    Rosalind Hursthouse took her undergraduate degree in New Zealand and her B. Phil. and D. Phil. at Oxford. She taught in Oxford for six years before joining the Open University in 1975. As part of her work for the O.U. she has published Beginning Lives (Blackwell, 1987) on the morality of abortion; this generated Virtue theory and abortion, Philosophy and Public Affairs, 1991) which has already been reprinted five times. She has published numerous other articles on virtue ethics, the most (...)
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  43.  3
    Aristotle.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1986 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 20:33.
    Aristotle (384–322 BC) was born in Stagira, Macedonia. He went to Athens and entered Plato's Academy when he was eighteen. He remained there until Plato's death in about 347 BC, when he left Athens to spend the next five years at Assos in Asia Minor and at Mytilene on the island of Lesbos, working on philosophy and biology. In 343 he was invited to return to Macedonia to tutor the son of Philip II of Macedonia, the future Alexander the Great. (...)
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  44. Denoting in the principles of mathematics.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1980 - Synthese 45 (1):33 - 42.
    In "the principles of mathematics" russell accepts (a) that word meaning (e.G., That 'fido' means fido) is irrelevant to logic and (b) that such sentences as 'all men are mortal' do not express quantified propositions but are about things (in this case, The class of men). If we note these confusions, And also that (b), Though not (a) has been abandoned by 'on denoting', We see what denoting is and how russell relates to frege on sinn and bedautung.
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  45.  57
    Doctor‐assisted suicide: a commentary on Lesser.Rosalind Hursthouse - 2010 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):335-336.
  46. Excessivness and Our Natural Development.Rosalind Hursthouse - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy:171-196.
  47.  5
    Formal Logic: A Workbook.Rosalind Hursthouse, Janet Radcliffe Richards, Tom Sorell & Wilfrid Hodges - 1980
  48.  5
    Foot, Philippa.Rosalind Hursthouse - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Hoboken, NJ: Blackwell.
    Philippa Foot (1920–2010) is widely regarded as one of the foremost Anglo-American moral philosophers of the twentieth century. Her published work, spanning 50 years, consisted entirely of essays until its culmination in her only monograph, Natural Goodness (2001). Although her work forms, by and large, a coherent whole, subsets of the essays relate to different areas of ethics, in each of which she made a substantial contribution. In applied ethics, most of the essays are on abortion (1967, 1970, 1985). In (...)
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  49.  28
    Hume on Justice.Rosalind Hursthouse - 2009 - In Charles R. Pigden (ed.), Hume on Motivation and Virtue. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 264.
    What motivates the benevolent or charitable agent is regard for another’s good or well-being, but talk about regard for others’ good or well- being is simply talk about benevolence or charity in different terms. Yet Hume clearly holds that the regard for another’s good is a motive to produce benevolent acts that is distinct from a sense of their benevolence. So what is the difference? ‘Well’, one might say, ‘intuitively, rights are very different from wellbeing.’ Yes indeed. And that, I (...)
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  50.  2
    Introduction to Philosophy.Rosalind Hursthouse - 1978
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