Results for 'Rebecca Howes-Mischel'

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  1.  23
    'Show Me Your Original Face Before You Were Born': The Convergence of Public Fetuses and Sacred DNA.Scott F. Gilbert & Rebecca Howes-Mischel - 2004 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 26 (3/4):377 - 479.
    Embryology is an intensely visual field, and it has provided the public with images of human embryos and fetuses. The responses to these images can be extremely powerful and personal, and the images (as well as our reactions to them) are conditioned by social and political agendas. The image of the 'autonomous fetus' abstracts the fetus from the mother, the womb, and from all social contexts, thereby emphasizing 'individuality'. The image of 'sacred DNA' emphasizes DNA as the unmoved mover, the (...)
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  2. Performative Force, Convention, and Discursive Injustice.Rebecca Kukla - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (2):440-457.
    I explore how gender can shape the pragmatics of speech. In some circumstances, when a woman deploys standard discursive conventions in order to produce a speech act with a specific performative force, her utterance can turn out, in virtue of its uptake, to have a quite different force—a less empowering force—than it would have if performed by a man. When members of a disadvantaged group face a systematic inability to produce a specific kind of speech act that they are entitled (...)
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  3. Social kinds are essentially mind-dependent.Rebecca Mason - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 178 (12):3975-3994.
    I defend a novel view of how social kinds (e.g., money, women, permanent residents) depend on our mental states. In particular, I argue that social kinds depend on our mental states in the following sense: it is essential to them that they exist (partially) because certain mental states exist. This analysis is meant to capture the very general way in which all social kinds depend on our mental states. However, my view is that particular social kinds also depend on our (...)
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  4. Trust, Testimony, and Reasons for Belief.Rebecca Wallbank & Andrew Reisner - 2020 - In Kevin McCain & Scott Stapleford (eds.), Epistemic Duties: New Arguments, New Angles. Routledge.
    This chapter explores two kinds of testimonial trust, what we call ‘evidential trust’ and ‘non-evidential trust’ with the aim of asking how testimonial trust could provide epistemic reasons for belief. We argue that neither evidential nor non-evidential trust can play a distinctive role in providing evidential reasons for belief, but we tentatively propose that non-evidential trust can in some circumstances provide a novel kind of epistemic reason for belief, a reason of epistemic facilitation. The chapter begins with an extensive discussion (...)
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  5. Against Social Kind Anti-Realism.Rebecca Mason - forthcoming - Metaphysics 3 (1):55-67.
    The view that social kinds (e.g., money, migrant, marriage) are mind-dependent is a prominent one in the social ontology literature. However, in addition to the claim that social kinds are mind-dependent, it is often asserted that social kinds are not real because they are mind-dependent. Call this view social kind anti-realism. To defend their view, social kind anti-realists must accomplish two tasks. First, they must identify a dependence relation that obtains between social kinds and our mental states. Call this the (...)
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  6.  37
    Unrequited.Rebecca Bamford - 2015 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (3):355-360.
    Abstract:I raise several concerns with Earp and colleagues' analysis of enhancement through neurochemical modulation of love as a key issue in contemporary neuroethics. These include: (i) strengthening their deflation of medicalization concerns by showing how the objection that love should be left outside of the scope of medicine would directly undermine the goal of medicine; (ii) developing stronger analysis of the social and political concerns relevant to neurochemical modulation of love, by exploring and suggesting possible counters to ways in which (...)
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  7.  5
    How Clinical Trial Data Sharing Platforms Can Advance the Study of Biomarkers.Rebecca Li & Ida Sim - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (3):369-373.
    Although data sharing platforms host diverse data types the features of these platforms are well-suited to facilitating biomarker research. Given the current state of biomarker discovery, an innovative paradigm to accelerate biomarker discovery is to utilize platforms such as Vivli to leverage researchers' abilities to integrate certain classes of biomarkers.
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  8.  91
    White Self-Criticality Beyond Anti-Racism: How Does It Feel to Be a White Problem?Rebecca Aanerud, Barbara Applebaum, Alison Bailey, Steve Garner, Robin James, Crista Lebens, Steve Martinot, Nancy McHugh, Bridget M. Newell, David S. Owen, Alexis Sartwell & Karen Teel - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    George Yancy gathers white scholarship that dwells on the experience of whiteness as a problem without sidestepping the question’s implications for Black people or people of color. This unprecedented reversion of the “Black problem” narrative challenges contemporary rhetoric of a color-evasive world in a critically engaging and persuasive study.
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  9.  50
    How Do I Code for Black Fingernail Polish? Finding the Missing Adolescent in Managed Mental Health Care.Rebecca J. Lester - 2011 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 39 (4):481-496.
  10.  8
    Residency Requirements for Medical Aid in Dying.Rebecca Dresser - 2024 - Hastings Center Report 54 (3):3-5.
    In 1997, when Oregon became the first U.S. jurisdiction authorizing medical aid in dying (MAID), its law included a requirement that patients be legal residents of the state. Other U.S. jurisdictions legalizing MAID followed Oregon in adopting residency requirements. Recent litigation challenges the legality, as well as the justification, for such requirements. Facing such challenges, Oregon and Vermont eliminated their MAID residency requirements. More states could follow this move, for, in certain circumstances, the U.S. Constitution's privileges and immunities clause protects (...)
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  11.  21
    The Impact of Transmissible Microbes: How the Cystic Fibrosis Community Mobilized Against Cepacia.Rebecca Mueller - 2023 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 66 (1):89-106.
    Abstractabstract:Long before COVID-19 made social distancing familiar, people with cystic fibrosis (CF) already practiced such behaviors. CF is held up as a classic example of genetic disease, yet people with CF are also susceptible to bacteria from the environment and from other CF patients. Starting in the 1980s, a bacterial epidemic in the CF population highlighted clashing priorities of connection, physical safety, and environmental protection. Policymakers ultimately called for the physical separation of people with CF from one another via recommendations (...)
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  12. How do patients know?Rebecca Kukla - 2007 - Hastings Center Report 37 (5):27-35.
    : The way patients make health care decisions is much more complicated than is often recognized. Patient autonomy allows both that patients will sometimes defer to clinicians and that they should sometimes be active inquirers, ready to question their clinicians and do some independent research. At the same time, patients' active inquiry requires clinicians' support.
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  13.  86
    How can you patent genes?Rebecca S. Eisenberg - 2002 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (3):3 – 11.
    What accounts for the continued lack of clarity over the legal procedures for the patenting of DNA sequences? The patenting system was built for a "bricks-and-mortar" world rather than an information economy. The fact that genes are both material molecules and informational systems helps explain the difficulty that the patent system is going to continue to have.
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  14.  71
    Motivated proofs: What they are, why they matter and how to write them.Rebecca Lea Morris - 2020 - Review of Symbolic Logic 13 (1):23-46.
    Mathematicians judge proofs to possess, or lack, a variety of different qualities, including, for example, explanatory power, depth, purity, beauty and fit. Philosophers of mathematical practice have begun to investigate the nature of such qualities. However, mathematicians frequently draw attention to another desirable proof quality: being motivated. Intuitively, motivated proofs contain no "puzzling" steps, but they have received little further analysis. In this paper, I begin a philosophical investigation into motivated proofs. I suggest that a proof is motivated if and (...)
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  15. Just how cognitive is emotion? The continuing importance of the philosophy of emotion in enhancement ethics.Rebecca Bamford - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics-Neuroscience 4 (1):18-19.
  16. How constitutional theory found its soul : The contributions of Ronald Dworkin.Rebecca L. Brown - 2006 - In Scott Hershovitz (ed.), Exploring Law's Empire: The Jurisprudence of Ronald Dworkin. Oxford University Press.
     
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  17.  44
    Serial Participation and the Ethics of Phase 1 Healthy Volunteer Research.Rebecca L. Walker, Marci D. Cottingham & Jill A. Fisher - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (1):83-114.
    Phase 1 healthy volunteer clinical trials—which financially compensate subjects in tests of drug toxicity levels and side effects—appear to place pressure on each joint of the moral framework justifying research. In this article, we review concerns about phase 1 trials as they have been framed in the bioethics literature, including undue inducement and coercion, unjust exploitation, and worries about compromised data validity. We then revisit these concerns in light of the lived experiences of serial participants who are income-dependent on phase (...)
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  18.  26
    Plato at the Googleplex: why philosophy won't go away.Rebecca Goldstein - 2014 - New York: Pantheon.
    From the acclaimed writer and thinker--whose award-winning books include both fiction and non-fiction--a dazzlingly original plunge into the drama of philosophy, revealing its hidden but essential role in today's debates on love, religion, politics, and science. Imagine that Plato came to life in the 21st century and set out on a multi-city speaking tour: How would he handle a host on Fox News who challenges him on religion and morality? How would he mediate a debate on the best way to (...)
  19.  25
    “The Uncertain Method of Drops”: How a Non-Uniform Unit Survived the Century of Standardization.Rebecca L. Jackson - 2021 - Perspectives on Science 29 (6):802-841.
    . This paper follows the journey of two small fluid units throughout the nineteenth century in Anglo-American medicine and pharmacy, explaining how the non-uniform “drop” survived while the standardized minim became obsolete. I emphasize two roles these units needed to fulfill: that of a physical measuring device, and that of a rhetorical communication device. First, I discuss the challenges unique to measuring small amounts of fluid, outlining how the modern medicine dropper developed out of an effort to resolve problems with (...)
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  20.  16
    The Neural Basis of Individual Face and Object Perception.Rebecca Watson, Elisabeth M. J. Huis in ’T. Veld & Beatrice de Gelder - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10:171072.
    We routinely need to process the identity of many faces around us, and how the brain achieves this is still the subject of much research in cognitive neuroscience. To date, insights on face identity processing have come from both healthy and clinical populations. However, in order to directly compare results across and within participant groups, and across different studies, it is crucial that a standard task is utilised which includes different exemplars (for example, non-face stimuli along with faces), is memory-neutral, (...)
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  21.  28
    Diversity in agricultural technology adoption: How are automatic milking systems used and to what end?Rebecca L. Schewe & Diana Stuart - 2015 - Agriculture and Human Values 32 (2):199-213.
    Adoption of technology in agriculture can significantly reorganize production and relationships amongst humans, animals, technology, and the natural environment. However, the adoption of agricultural technology is not homogenous, and diversity in integration leads to a diversity of outcomes and impacts. In this study, we examine the adoption of automated milking systems in small and midsize dairy farms in the US Midwest, the Netherlands, and Denmark. In contrast to technological determinism, we find significant variation amongst adopters in the implementation of AMS (...)
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  22. Social Ontology.Rebecca Mason & Katherine Ritchie - 2020 - In Ricki Bliss & James Miller (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Metametaphysics. New York, NY: Routledge.
    Traditionally, social entities (i.e., social properties, facts, kinds, groups, institutions, and structures) have not fallen within the purview of mainstream metaphysics. In this chapter, we consider whether the exclusion of social entities from mainstream metaphysics is philosophically warranted or if it instead rests on historical accident or bias. We examine three ways one might attempt to justify excluding social metaphysics from the domain of metaphysical inquiry and argue that each fails. Thus, we conclude that social entities are not justifiably excluded (...)
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  23.  26
    How happy have you felt lately? Two diary studies of emotion recall in older and younger adults.Rebecca E. Ready, Mark I. Weinberger & Kelly M. Jones - 2007 - Cognition and Emotion 21 (4):728-757.
  24.  25
    Aquinas's Ethics: Metaphysical Foundations, Moral Theory, and Theological Context.Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung, Colleen McCluskey & Christina van Dyke - 2009 - University of Notre Dame Press. Edited by Colleen McCluskey & Christina van Dyke.
    The purpose of __Aquinas's Ethics__ is to place Thomas Aquinas's moral theory in its full philosophical and theological context and to do so in a way that makes Aquinas readily accessible to students and interested general readers, including those encountering Aquinas for the first time. Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung, Colleen McCluskey, and Christina Van Dyke begin by explaining Aquinas's theories of the human person and human action, since these ground his moral theory. In their interpretation, Aquinas's theological commitments crucially shape (...)
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  25.  29
    Correction to: Moral Burden of Bottom-Line Pursuits: How and When Perceptions of Top Management Bottom-Line Mentality Inhibit Supervisors’ Ethical Leadership Practices.Rebecca L. Greenbaum, Mayowa T. Babalola, Matthew J. Quade, Liang Guo & Yun Chung Kim - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (1):125-125.
    The name of the first author was incorrect in the initial online publication. The original article has been corrected.
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  26.  16
    Facebook and Me, or How I Spent My Summer Vacation.Rebecca A. Martusewicz - 2010 - Educational Studies: A Jrnl of the American Educ. Studies Assoc 46 (5):447-449.
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  27. That’s What She Said: The Language of Sexual Negotiation.Rebecca Kukla - 2018 - Ethics 129 (1):70-97.
    I explore how we negotiate sexual encounters with one another in language and consider the pragmatic structure of such negotiations. I defend three theses: Discussions of consent have dominated the philosophical and legal discourse around sexual negotiation, and this has distorted our understanding of sexual agency and ethics. Of central importance to good-quality sexual negotiation are sexual invitations and gift offers, as well as speech designed to set up safe frameworks and exit conditions. Sexual communication that goes well does not (...)
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  28.  9
    Social (in)justice: why many popular answers to important questions of race, gender, and identity are wrong-and how to know what's right: a reader-friendly remix of Cynical theories.Rebecca Christiansen - 2021 - Durham, North Carolina: Pitchstone Publishing. Edited by Helen Pluckrose & James A. Lindsay.
    Argues that many popular approaches to questions of social justice are illiberal and offers an alternative vision for social justice based on liberal principles, adapted from the Wall Street Journal bestseller Cynical Theories.
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  29.  20
    Sophia Roosth, Synthetic: How Life Got Made: The University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London, 2017, 256 pp., 16 b&w illus., $35.00 Paper, ISBN: 9780226440460.Rebecca Wilbanks - 2019 - Journal of the History of Biology 52 (2):349-352.
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  30. Expressions of emotion as perceptual media.Rebecca Rowson - 2023 - Synthese 201 (6):1-23.
    Expressions of emotion pose a serious challenge to the view that we perceive other people’s emotions directly. If we must perceive expressions in order to perceive emotions, then it is only ever the expressions that we are directly aware of, not emotions themselves. This paper develops a new response to this challenge by drawing an analogy between expressions of emotion and perceptual media. It is through illumination and sound, the paradigmatic examples of perceptual media, that we can see and hear (...)
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  31. Glittering Vices: A New Look at the Seven Deadly Sins.Rebecca DeYoung - 2009 - Grand Rapids: Brazos Press.
    Contemporary culture trivializes the "seven deadly sins," or vices, as if they have no serious moral or spiritual implications. Glittering Vices clears this misconception by exploring the traditional meanings of gluttony, sloth, lust, and others. It offers a brief history of how the vices were compiled and an eye opening explication of how each sin manifests itself in various destructive behaviors. Readers gain practical understanding of how the vices shape our culture today and how to correctly identify and eliminate the (...)
     
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  32.  19
    L’Antiquité politique de Jean-Jacques Rousseau: entre exemples et modèles L’Antiquité politique de Jean-Jacques Rousseau: entre exemples et modèles, by Flora Champy. Paris, Classiques Garnier, 2022, 632 pp., 32€(pb), ISBN 978-2-406-12530-3. [REVIEW]Rebecca Wilkin - 2024 - Intellectual History Review 34 (2):506-509.
    Flora Champy shows how Rousseau developed his political philosophy by reference to ancient examples, intertexts, and interlocutors. Her literary methodology involves close readings of published tex...
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  33.  20
    Feminism and Popular Culture: Investigating the Postfeminist Mystique.Rebecca Munford, Melanie Waters & Imelda Whelehan - 2014 - New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press. Edited by Melanie Waters.
    When the term “postfeminism” entered the media lexicon in the 1990s, it was often accompanied by breathless headlines about the “death of feminism.” Those reports of feminism’s death may have been greatly exaggerated, and yet contemporary popular culture often conjures up a world in which feminism had never even been born, a fictional universe filled with suburban Stepford wives, maniacal career women, alluring amnesiacs, and other specimens of retro femininity. In _Feminism and Popular Culture_, Rebecca Munford and Melanie Waters (...)
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  34.  29
    How is theory of mind useful? Perhaps to enable social pretend play.Rebecca A. Dore, Eric D. Smith & Angeline S. Lillard - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  35.  13
    INSPIRED but Tired: How Medical Faculty’s Job Demands and Resources Lead to Engagement, Work-Life Conflict, and Burnout.Rebecca S. Lee, Leanne S. Son Hing, Vishi Gnanakumaran, Shelly K. Weiss, Donna S. Lero, Peter A. Hausdorf & Denis Daneman - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    BackgroundPast research shows that physicians experience high ill-being but also high well-being.ObjectiveTo shed light on how medical faculty’s experiences of their job demands and job resources might differentially affect their ill-being and their well-being with special attention to the role that the work-life interface plays in these processes.MethodsQualitative thematic analysis was used to analyze interviews from 30 medical faculty at a top research hospital in Canada.FindingsMedical faculty’s experiences of work-life conflict were severe. Faculty’s job demands had coalescing effects on their (...)
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  36.  11
    Getting Developmental Science Back Into Schools: Can What We Know About Self-Regulation Help Change How We Think About “No Excuses”?Rebecca Bailey, Emily A. Meland, Gretchen Brion-Meisels & Stephanie M. Jones - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
  37.  31
    How to get an interpretivist committed.Rebecca Kukla - 2000 - ProtoSociology 14:180-221.
    I argue that interpretivists ought to broaden and enrich the constitutive standards of interpretability and epistemic agency that they have inherited from classic Davidsonian theory. Drawing heavily upon John Haugeland’s recent account of objective truth- telling, I claim that in order to be an interpretable epistemic agent at all, a being must have various kinds of practical commitments that cannot be reduced to combinations of beliefs and desires.On the basis of this claim, I argue that radical interpreters must appeal to (...)
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  38.  16
    Just How Cognitive Is Emotion? The Continuing Importance of the Philosophy of Emotion in Enhancement Ethics.Rebecca Bamford - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 4 (1):18-19.
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  39.  21
    Studying Human Behavior: How Scientists Investigate Aggression and Sexuality by Helen Longino (review).Rebecca Kukla - 2014 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (1):97-103.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Studying Human Behavior: How Scientists Investigate Aggression and Sexuality by Helen LonginoRebecca KuklaReview: Helen Longino, Studying Human Behavior: How Scientists Investigate Aggression and Sexuality, University of Chicago Press, 2013In Studying Human Behavior: How Scientists Investigate Aggression and Sexuality, Helen Longino meticulously examines a wide variety of research programs devoted to studying human behavior, specifically aggression and sexual orientation. She teases apart the methodologies of the various approaches, examining (...)
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  40.  12
    Moral Burden of Bottom-Line Pursuits: How and When Perceptions of Top Management Bottom-Line Mentality Inhibit Supervisors’ Ethical Leadership Practices.Rebecca L. Greenbaum, Mayowa Babalola, Matthew J. Quade, Liang Guo & Yun Chung Kim - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (1):109-123.
    Drawing on theoretical work on humans’ adaptive capacity, we propose that supervisors’ perception of top management’s high bottom-line mentality (BLM) has a dysfunctional effect on their ethical leadership practices. Specifically, we suggest that these perceptions hinder supervisors’ empathy, which eventuates in less ethical leadership practices. We also investigate, in a first-stage moderated mediation model, how supervisors high in trait mindfulness are resistant to the ill effects of perceptions of top management’s high BLM. Supervisors high (versus low) in this trait are (...)
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  41.  12
    Moral Burden of Bottom-Line Pursuits: How and When Perceptions of Top Management Bottom-Line Mentality Inhibit Supervisors’ Ethical Leadership Practices.Rebecca L. Greenbaum, Mayowa Babalola, Matthew J. Quade, Liang Guo & Yun Chung Kim - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 174 (1):109-123.
    Drawing on theoretical work on humans’ adaptive capacity, we propose that supervisors’ perception of top management’s high bottom-line mentality (BLM) has a dysfunctional effect on their ethical leadership practices. Specifically, we suggest that these perceptions hinder supervisors’ empathy, which eventuates in less ethical leadership practices. We also investigate, in a first-stage moderated mediation model, how supervisors high in trait mindfulness are resistant to the ill effects of perceptions of top management’s high BLM. Supervisors high (versus low) in this trait are (...)
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  42.  19
    From potential to practice: Compelling questions as an impetus for curricular and instructional change.Rebecca G. W. Mueller - 2018 - Journal of Social Studies Research 42 (3):249-260.
    Despite arguments that successful inquiry hinges on an engaging question, relatively little attention has been paid to how teachers craft such questions. This study examined how six high school civics teachers defined and developed compelling questions and evaluated the potential of compelling questions to influence curriculum and instruction. This study used qualitative research methods and generated data through interviews, verbal reports, and content analysis of teacher-completed materials. Findings suggest that teachers are hopeful that compelling questions will prompt challenging instruction that (...)
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  43.  16
    Dependent masculinity and political culture in pro-mountaintop removal discourse: Or, how I learned to stop worrying and love the dragline.Rebecca R. Scott - 2007 - Feminist Studies 33 (3):484-509.
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  44.  15
    How to Protect Children? A Pragmatic Approach: On State Intervention and Children’s Welfare.Rebecca Gutwald & Michael Reder - 2023 - The Journal of Ethics 27 (1):77-95.
    If a child’s well-being is at risk of considerable harm within their own family, state institutions usually intervene. In severe cases, the parents’ right to rear is suspended. Cases of risk assessment and potential state intervention are decided within a conflict between parents’ rights and claims of children for protection. There is, we argue, a standard model of normative assessment underlying these decisions: It rests on premises rooted in classic liberal political philosophy, which is prevalent in many Western societies, such (...)
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  45. OBO Foundry in 2021: Operationalizing Open Data Principles to Evaluate Ontologies.Rebecca C. Jackson, Nicolas Matentzoglu, James A. Overton, Randi Vita, James P. Balhoff, Pier Luigi Buttigieg, Seth Carbon, Melanie Courtot, Alexander D. Diehl, Damion Dooley, William Duncan, Nomi L. Harris, Melissa A. Haendel, Suzanna E. Lewis, Darren A. Natale, David Osumi-Sutherland, Alan Ruttenberg, Lynn M. Schriml, Barry Smith, Christian J. Stoeckert, Nicole A. Vasilevsky, Ramona L. Walls, Jie Zheng, Christopher J. Mungall & Bjoern Peters - 2021 - BioaRxiv.
    Biological ontologies are used to organize, curate, and interpret the vast quantities of data arising from biological experiments. While this works well when using a single ontology, integrating multiple ontologies can be problematic, as they are developed independently, which can lead to incompatibilities. The Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies Foundry was created to address this by facilitating the development, harmonization, application, and sharing of ontologies, guided by a set of overarching principles. One challenge in reaching these goals was that the (...)
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  46.  23
    How does psychotherapy work? A case study in multilevel explanation.Rebecca Roache - 2015 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38:e23.
    Multilevel explanations abound in psychiatry. However, formulating useful such explanations is difficult or (some argue) impossible. I point to several ways in which Lane et al. successfully use multilevel explanations to advance understanding of psychotherapeutic effectiveness. I argue that the usefulness of an explanation depends largely on one's purpose, and conclude that this point has been inadequately recognised in psychiatry.
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  47.  11
    Nietzsche's Orphans: Music, Metaphysics, and the Twilight of the Russian Empire.Rebecca Mitchell - 2015 - Yale University Press.
    A prevailing belief among Russia’s cultural elite in the early twentieth century was that the music of composers such as Sergei Rachmaninoff, Aleksandr Scriabin, and Nikolai Medtner could forge a shared identity for the Russian people across social and economic divides. In this illuminating study of competing artistic and ideological visions at the close of Russia’s “Silver Age,” author Rebecca Mitchell interweaves cultural history, music, and philosophy to explore how “Nietzsche’s orphans” strove to find in music a means to (...)
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  48.  40
    Pragmatic aspects of explanation.Theodore Mischel - 1966 - Philosophy of Science 33 (1/2):40-60.
    How can reasons explain actions? What is the force of "because" in "He did this because..." followed by a statement of the agent's intentions? The answer involves some concept of what can count as explanation, and the history of science indicates that the acceptability of explanations depends, in part, on a scientific community which has decided to pursue its inquiries in one direction rather than another. The first part of this paper examines this pragmatic aspect of explanations; the second part (...)
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  49.  26
    The Fading Light of Advaita Acarya: Three Hagiographies.Rebecca J. Manring - 2012 - Oup Usa.
    Rebecca J. Manring offers a hagiographical treatment of Advaita Acarya, a fifteenth century leader in a new devotional school of Vaisnavism. She uses the Bengali material as a case study of how to read and understand hagiographical literature.
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  50.  14
    ‘A fruit of every clime’? Rousseau’s environmental politics.Rebecca Aili Ploof - 2023 - Contemporary Political Theory 22 (3):307-329.
    An important branch of environmental theory frames the climate crisis as a moral problem in need of a moral solution: human hubris is responsible for environmental degradation and must be atoned for through humility. Politically indeterminate, however, such argumentation is vulnerable to de-politicizing and mal-politicizing capture. In an effort to fend off the threat of either, this paper turns to the history of political thought and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, who theorized the environment as both a moral and a political domain. I (...)
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