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Alfred J. Freddoso [46]Alfred Freddoso [14]Alfred Joseph Freddoso [1]
  1.  42
    God's general concurrence with secondary causes: Why conservation is not enough.Alfred J. Freddoso - 1991 - Philosophical Perspectives 5:553-585.
    After an exposition of some key concepts in scholastic ontology, this paper examines four arguments presented by Francisco Suarez for the thesis, commonly held by Christian Aristotelians, that God's causal contribution to effects occurring in the ordinary course of nature goes beyond His merely conserving created substances along with their active and passive causal powers. The postulation of a further causal contribution, known as God's general concurrence (or general concourse), can be viewed as an attempt to accommodate an element of (...)
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  2.  49
    Maximal Power.Thomas P. Flint & Alfred J. Freddoso - 1983 - In Alfred J. Freddoso (ed.), The Existence and Nature of God. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 81--114.
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  3.  4
    Introduction.Alfred Freddoso - 1988
    Some contemporary theologians dismiss the classical discussions of the existence and nature of God as out of step with and unworthy of serious consideration by so-called "modern man." Others contend that even though the historical giants of philosophical theology generally had an intimate acquaintance with Sacred Scripture, their philosophical biases beguiled them unwittingly into forming conceptions of God that are wholly foreign to as well as incompatible with the biblical conception of God. These two distinct lines of criticism sometimes converge (...)
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  4.  17
    Accidental necessity and logical determinism.Alfred J. Freddoso - 1983 - Journal of Philosophy 80 (5):257-278.
    This paper attempts to construct a systematic and plausible account of the necessity of the past. The account proposed is meant to explicate the central ockhamistic thesis of the primacy of the pure present and to vindicate Ockham's own non-Aristotelian response to the challenge of logical determinism.
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  5.  18
    Medieval Aristotelianism and the Case against Secondary Causation in Nature.Alfred J. Freddoso - 1988 - In Thomas V. Morris (ed.), Divine and human action: essays in the metaphysics of theism. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press. pp. 74-118.
    Central to the western theistic understanding of divine providence is the conviction that God is the sovereign Lord of nature. He created the physical universe and continually conserves it in existence. What's more, He is always and everywhere active in it by His power. The operations of nature, be they minute or catastrophic, commonplace or unprecedented, are the work of His hands, and without His constant causal influence none of them would or could occur.
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  6.  24
    God’s General Concurrence with Secondary Causes: Pitfalls and Prospects.Alfred J. Freddoso - 1994 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 68 (2):131-156.
    My topic is God's activity in the ordinary course of nature. The precise mode of this activity has been the subject of prolonged debates within every major theistic intellectual tradition, though it is within the Catholic tradition that the discussion has been carried on with the most philosophical sophistication. The problem, in its simplest form, is this: Given the fundamental theistic tenet that God is the provident Lord of nature, the First Efficient Cause who creates the universe, sustains it in (...)
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  7. On Divine Foreknowledge: Part IV of the Concordia.Alfred J. Freddoso (ed.) - 1988 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    Luis de Molina was a leading figure in the remarkable sixteenth-century revival of Scholasticism on the Iberian peninsula.
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  8.  47
    God’s General Concurrence with Secondary Causes.Alfred J. Freddoso - 1994 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 68 (2):131-156.
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  9.  8
    The Existence and Nature of God.Alfred J. Freddoso (ed.) - 1983 - Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press.
    These original essays offer evidence that a growing number of Anglo-American philosophers are finding in the classical discussion of God's existence and nature fertile sources for critical reflection on issues in the philosophy of religion. Nelson Pike challenges Aquinas' claim that God is not responsible for evil and shows how the rejection of this claim bears on the problem of evil. Richard Swinburne defends the classical Christian understanding of heaven and hell, arguing that it is both philosophically plausible and compatible (...)
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  10.  6
    Human Nature, Potency and the Incarnation.Alfred J. Freddoso - 1986 - Faith and Philosophy 3 (1):27-53.
    According to the Christian doctrine of the Incarnation, the Son of God is truly but only contingently a human being. But is it also the case that Christ’s individual human nature is only contingently united to a divine person? The affirmative answer to this question, explicitly espoused by Duns Scotus and William of Ockham, turns out to be philosophically untenable, while the negative answer, which is arguably implicit in St. Thomas Aquinas, explication of the Incarnation, has some surprising and significant (...)
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  11.  54
    On Efficient Causality: Metaphysical Disputations 17, 18, and 19.Robert Pasnau, Francisco Suarez & Alfred J. Freddoso - 1996 - Philosophical Review 105 (4):533.
    A quick scan of the leading figures in western philosophy reveals that relatively few have made a name for themselves by defending intuitive, natural, and sensible positions. Aristotle is one, and perhaps Aquinas is another. Francisco Suarez, the sixteenth-century Spanish scholastic, would be a third. His invariable working procedure is to give copious consideration to the various ancient and medieval views, and then to find some sensible compromise position. But today Suarez can hardly claim to have a broad readership. Of (...)
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  12.  13
    The Necessity of Nature.Alfred J. Freddoso - 1986 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 11 (1):215-242.
    This paper lays out the main contours of an objectivistic account of natural necessity that locates its source within natural substances themselves. The key claims are that what occurs by a necessity of nature constitutes the culmination of deterministic natural tendencies and that these tendencies are themselves rooted in the natures or essences of natural substances. The paper concludes by discussing the notion of a law of nature as it emerges on this account.
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  13.  30
    John Buridan on Self-Reference: Chapter Eight of Buridan's Sophismata.Alfred J. Freddoso - 1986 - Noûs 20 (1):77-81.
  14.  20
    Abailard on collective realism.Alfred J. Freddoso - 1978 - Journal of Philosophy 75 (10):527-538.
    In the Logica Ingredientibus Abailard attacks the theory according to which universals are collections of individuals. This paper argues that Abailard's principal objection to this 'collective realism', viz, that it conflates universals with integral wholes, is actually quite strong, though it is generally overlooked by recent commentators. For implicit in this objection is the claim that the collective realist cannot provide a satisfactory account of predication. The reason for this is that integral wholes are not uniquely decomposable. In support of (...)
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  15.  28
    On Divine Foreknowledge.John Martin Fischer, Luis De Molina & Alfred J. Freddoso - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (2):387.
  16.  8
    ``Accidental Necessity and Power Over the Past".Alfred J. Freddoso - 1982 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 63 (1):54-68.
    The thesis of this paper is that an agent S has the power to bring it about that a proposition p is or will be true at a moment t only if S has at the same time the power to bring it about that it has always been the case that p would be true at t. The author first constructs a prima facie compelling argument for logical determinism and then argues that whoever accepts an Ockhamistic response to that (...)
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  17.  3
    Logic, Ontology and Ockham’s Christology.Alfred J. Freddoso - 1983 - New Scholasticism 57 (3):293-330.
    Let me begin somewhat perversely by making clear what I do not intend to do in this paper. I do not propose to offer a general defense of Ockham's resolution of the metaphysical perplexities engendered by the dogma of the Incarnation. In fact, I have argued elsewhere that his account of the hypostatic union is seriously deficient. 1..
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  18.  37
    Ockham's Theory of Truth Conditions.Alfred J. Freddoso, William of Ockham & Henry Schuurman - 1984 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 49 (1):306-308.
  19.  8
    William of ockham.Alfred J. Freddoso - unknown
    Born in England and educated at Oxford, Ockham was the preeminent Franciscan thinker of the mid-fourteenth century. Because of his role in the bitter dispute between the Franciscans and Pope John XXII over evangelical poverty, he was excommunicated in 1328. After that he abandoned philosophy and theology proper, producing instead a series of political tracts on the ecclesiastical and secular power of the papacy.
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  20.  11
    No Room at the Inn: Contemporary Philosophy of Mind Meets Thomistic Philosophical Anthropology.Alfred J. Freddoso - 2015 - Acta Philosophica 24 (1):15-30.
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  21.  16
    Maksymalna moc.Thomas P. Flint, Alfred J. Freddoso, Marcin Iwanicki & Joanna Klara Teske - 2023 - Roczniki Filozoficzne 71 (1):519-550.
    Autorzy argumentują, że Bóg może być zarówno wszechmocny, jak i wszechmocny, oraz że Bóg może być zarówno wszechmocny, jak i nieskazitelny. Proponują pięć warunków filozoficznej adekwatności dla koncepcji maksymalnej mocy i przedstawiają analizę, która spełnia wszystkie pięć warunków. Jak argumentują, analiza ta jest zarówno filozoficznie adekwatna, jak i teologicznie akceptowalna.
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  22.  53
    The Cambridge History of Later Medieval Philosophy: From the Rediscovery of Aristotle to the Disintegration of Scholasticism, 1100-1600.Alfred J. Freddoso - 1984 - Journal of Philosophy 81 (3):150-156.
    This 1982 book is a history of the great age of scholastism from Abelard to the rejection of Aristotelianism in the Renaissance, combining the highest standards of medieval scholarship with a respect for the interests and insights of contemporary philosophers, particularly those working in the analytic tradition. The volume follows on chronologically from The Cambridge History of Later Greek and Early Medieval Philosophy, though it does not continue the histories of Greek and Islamic philosophy but concentrates on the Latin Christian (...)
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  23.  23
    Good News, Your Soul Hasn’t Died Quite Yet.Alfred J. Freddoso - 2001 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 75:79-96.
    In this paper, I observe that Hobbesian physicalism on the one side, and Cartesian dualism on the other, have had a widespread cultural influence on the way we regard ourselves and on the way we behave toward one another. I argue that what we now need is a conceptual space within which we might forge a metaphysical alternative, an alternative that will give us some hope of overcoming the deleterious intellectual, moral, and social consequences of both physicalism and dualism.
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  24.  13
    Molinism.Alfred Freddoso - manuscript
    Molinism, named after Luis de Molina, is a theological system for reconciling human freedom with God's grace and providence. Presupposing a strongly libertarian account of freedom, Molinists assert against their rivals that the grace whereby God cooperates with supernaturally salvific acts is not intrinsically efficacious. To preserve divine providence and foreknowledge, they then posit "middle knowledge", through which God knows, prior to his own free decrees, how any possible rational agent would freely act in any possible situation. Beyond this, they (...)
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  25.  11
    O-propositions and Ockham's theory of supposition.Alfred J. Freddoso - 1979 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 20 (4):741-750.
  26. Angels and demons.Alfred Freddoso - unknown
    despair.” In effect, he is telling us, “There is no God or divine providence, and there is no hope for eternal life. So there!” And even though today’s..
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  27.  6
    Abstract of Comments: Ockham and the Word made Flesh.Alfred J. Freddoso - 1982 - Noûs 16 (1):76 - 77.
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  28. Concept calculus.Alfred Freddoso - manuscript
    APA Panel on Logic in Philosophy, APA Eastern Division Annual Meeting, Baltimore Maryland, January 2, 2008, 17 pages. Supercedes 1/1/2008 and earlier versions.
     
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  29.  8
    Christian faith as a way of life.Alfred J. Freddoso - 2004 - In William Mann (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Religion. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 172–197.
  30.  5
    Church tradition and the catholic university: A response.Alfred Freddoso - manuscript
    Father Sokolowski advances two theses. The first is that "faculty members who teach theology . . . have a particularly strategic role to play in working out a successful harmony between the university and the Church and between faith and reason." The second is that "in the current controversies about the university and the magisterium, the Church has put itself and its own authority at a disadvantage because of the comprehensive revision of the liturgy that was carried out after the (...)
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  31.  14
    Fides et Ratio: A 'Radical' Vision of Intellectual Inquiry.Alfred J. Freddoso - unknown
    Commentators on Pope John Paul II's encyclical Fides et Ratio(1) have not failed to notice the incongruity that envelops the Pope's defense of the powers of reason against contemporary forms of skepticism. As Nicholas Wolterstorff has put it: "How surprising and ironic that roughly two centuries after Voltaire and his cohorts mocked the church as the bastion of irrationality, the church, in the person of the pope, should be the one to put in a good word for reason." (2) In (...)
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  32.  7
    Fides et ratio.Alfred J. Freddoso - 2005 - Studia Neoaristotelica 2 (2):226-238.
  33.  12
    Fides et ratio.Alfred J. Freddoso - 2005 - Studia Neoaristotelica 2 (2):226-238.
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  34.  4
    Good News, Your Soul Hasn’t Died Quite Yet.Alfred J. Freddoso - 2001 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 75:79-96.
    In this paper, I observe that Hobbesian physicalism on the one side, and Cartesian dualism on the other, have had a widespread cultural influence on the way we regard ourselves and on the way we behave toward one another. I argue that what we now need is a conceptual space within which we might forge a metaphysical alternative, an alternative that will give us some hope of overcoming the deleterious intellectual, moral, and social consequences of both physicalism and dualism.
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  35.  4
    Isbn 0-87462-145-.Alfred Freddoso - manuscript
    In this, the Aquinas Lecture for 1980, Alvin Plantinga proposes (p. 9) to discuss three questions: (i) does God have a nature? (ii) if so, is there a conflict between God's sovereignty and his having a nature? and (iii) how is God related to properties (including his nature), propositions, states of affairs, numbers, and other denizens of the Platonic realm of necessarily existing abstract entities? Plantinga's conclusions are straightforward: (i) God has a nature distinct from himself; (ii) the claim that (...)
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  36. I feel what you think.Alfred Freddoso - manuscript
    Psychological ascriptions are most commonly understood to be Machiavellian and objective (Dennett 1987, Fodor 1987, Heal 1986, Whiten & Byrne 1988). We ascribe thoughts, feelings, and desires to others to better understand them. Since we must cooperate, compete, or simply co-exist with others, the more we know about their psychology the better. Being aimed at understanding others—in relative independence from us—psychological ascriptions are objective. Such ascriptions are also Machiavellian to the extent that their ultimate aim is to help us plan (...)
     
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  37.  13
    Molina, Luis de.Alfred Freddoso - manuscript
    A leading figure in sixteenth-century Iberian scholasticism, Molina was one of the most controversial thinkers in the history of Catholic thought. In keeping with the strongly libertarian account of human free choice that marked the early Jesuit theologians, Molina held that God's causal influence on free human acts does not by its intrinsic nature uniquely determine what those acts will be or whether they will be good or evil. Because of this, Molina asserted against his Dominican rivals that God's comprehensive (...)
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  38.  3
    On Being a Catholic University: Some Thoughts On Our Present Predicament.Alfred J. Freddoso - unknown
    At a poignant juncture early in Brideshead Revisited, Sebastian, after briefly recounting for Charles his family's rather checkered performance with regard to its Catholicism, remarks, "I wish I liked Catholics more." When Charles replies, "They seem just like other people," Sebastian rebukes him: "My dear Charles, that's exactly what they're not ... It's not just that they're a clique-- as a matter of fact, they're at least four cliques all blackguarding each other half the time--but they've got an entirely different (...)
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  39.  4
    14 Ockham on Faith and Reason.Alfred J. Freddoso - 1999 - In P. V. Spade (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ockham. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 326.
  40.  5
    Ontological Reductionism and Faith Versus Reason: A Critique of Adams on Ockham.Alfred J. Freddoso - 1991 - Faith and Philosophy 8 (3):317-339.
    The purpose of this essay is to take issue with two aspects of Marilyn Adams's monumental work William Ockham . Part I deals with Ockham's ontology, arguing (i) that Adams does not sufficiently appreciate the use Ockham makes of the prinicple of ontological parsimony in his attempt to refute the thesis that there are extramental universals or common natures and (ii) that she sets an implausibly high standard of success for Ockham's project of showing that the only singular entities are (...)
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  41.  6
    Ontological Reductionism and Faith Versus Reason.Alfred J. Freddoso - 1991 - Faith and Philosophy 8 (3):317-339.
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  42.  11
    Quodlibetal Questions: Volumes 1 and 2, Quodlibets 1-7.Alfred J. Freddoso & Francis E. Kelley (eds.) - 1991 - Yale University Press.
    This book offers the first English translation of the Quodlibetal Questions of William of Ockham --reflections on a variety of topics in logic, ontology, natural philosophy, philosophical psychology, moral theory, and theology by one of the preeminent thinkers of the Middle Ages. It is based on the recent critical edition of Ockham's theological and philosophical works.
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  43.  12
    Character, Choice, and Harry Potter.Alfred J. Freddoso, Catherine Jack Deavel, Mark Wynn & John Haldane - 2002 - Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 5 (4):49-64.
  44.  8
    Character, Choice, and Harry Potter.Alfred J. Freddoso, Catherine Jack Deavel, Mark Wynn & John Haldane - 2002 - Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 5 (4):49-64.
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  45.  53
    2. Suarez on God's Causal Involvement in Sinful Acts.Alfred Freddoso - 2001 - In Michael J. Latzer & Elmar J. Kremer (eds.), The Problem of Evil in Early Modern Philosophy. University of Toronto Press. pp. 10-34.
    In this paper I will explore certain key features of Francisco Suarez's account of God's action in the world, with an eye toward explaining his view of the precise way in which God concurs with--that is, makes an immediate causal contribution to--free action in general and sinful action in particular. Suarez agrees with his mainly Thomistic opponents that God is an immediate cause of every effect produced by creatures--including every free act and, a fortiori , every sinful act elicited by (...)
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  46.  4
    Some reflections on translating scholastic philosophy.Alfred Freddoso - manuscript
    I would be scandalously remiss were I not to preface my remarks on translation with two expressions of gratitude to the Franciscan Institute. First of all, I am very pleased to have been invited to participate in this celebration of Ockham, not merely for professional reasons but also because I have thereby been afforded the opportunity to return to the Southerntier, as this part of New York State is known to those of us who trace our roots to the Buffalo (...)
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  47.  3
    The church and art.Alfred Freddoso - manuscript
    The Holy Father first invokes the common philosophical distinction between doing and making, which underlies the further distinction, at the level of habit, between a virtue (habitual doing-well) and craft or art (habitual making-well). On the one hand, doing-well--that is, acting in accord with our ultimate end--constitutes our goodness as human persons (our..
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  48.  6
    The cambridge history of later medieval philosophy: From the rediscovery of Aristotle to the disintegration of.Alfred Freddoso - manuscript
    The Cambridge History of Later Medieval Philosophy (CHOLMP) brings together in one volume an impressively large number (47) of short essays (averaging 18 pages) by an impressively large number (41) of able scholars. The final product, sad to report, is something less than impressive.
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  49. The Existence and Nature of God.Alfred J. Freddoso - 1984 - Religious Studies 20 (4):682-685.
     
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  50.  10
    Treatise on Human Nature: The Complete Text.Alfred J. Freddoso (ed.) - 2010 - St. Augustine's Press.
    "This is the only free-standing English translation of the entire Treatise on human nature, which includes St. Thomas's account of the metaphysical status of the human soul and its relation to the human organism ; the powers of the soul, especially the higher intellective powers that distinguish humans from other animals ; and, those questions on human origins, the creation of the first man and first woman, and their status as being created in the image of God."--Cover, p. 1.
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