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  1. H. Cherniss: L'énigme de l'Ancienne Académie Pp. 231. Paris, J. Vrin, 1993. Paper, 150 FF.Jonathan Barnes - 1995 - The Classical Review 45 (1):178-178.
  2. Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity.Harold Tarrant, Danielle A. Layne, Dirk Baltzly & François Renaud (eds.) - 2017 - Leiden: Brill.
    31 chapters covering the Old Academy to Late Antiquity. See attached TOC.
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  3. ΔΙΑΝΟΗΜΑΤΑ. Kleine Schriften Zu Platon Und Zum Platonismus.Peter Lautner - 2001 - Ancient Philosophy 21 (2):498-501.
  4. Speusippus of Athens: A Critical Study with a Collection of the Related Texts and Commentary.Leonardo Tarán (ed.) - 1981 - Brill.
    CHAPTER ONE LIFE The extant evidence about Speusippus' life is scanty, and little of it is reliable. The reasons are not difficult to discover : the greater ...
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Speusippus
  1. Speusippus, Teleology and the Metaphysics of Value: Theophrastus’ Metaphysics 11a18–26.Wei Cheng - 2020 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 140:143-175.
    This paper reexamines Theophrastus’ Metaphysics 11a18–26, an obscure testimony about Speusippus, the second head of the Platonic Academy. As opposed to the traditional interpretation, which takes this passage as Theophrastus’ polemic against Speusippus’ doctrine of value, I argue that he here dialectically takes advantage of, rather than launches an attack on, the Platonist. Based on this new reading, I further propose a revision and a reassessment of the ‘gloomy metaphysics’ of Speusippus which will shed new light on his ethics.
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  2. Aristotle and Eudoxus on the Argument From Contraries.Wei Cheng - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (4):588-618.
    The debate over the value of pleasure among Eudoxus, Speusippus, and Aristotle is dramatically documented by the Nicomachean Ethics, particularly in the dialectical pros-and-cons concerning the so-called argument from contraries. Two similar versions of this argument are preserved at EN VII. 13, 1153b1–4, and X. 2, 1172b18–20. Many scholars believe that the argument at EN VII is either a report or an appropriation of the Eudoxean argument in EN X. This essay aims to revise this received view. It will explain (...)
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  3. Speusippus and Xenocrates on the Pursuit and Ends of Philosophy.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2018 - In Harold Tarrant, Danielle Lane, Dirk Baltzly & François Tanguay Renaud (eds.), Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity. Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 29-45.
    The philosophical practices undertaken in Plato's Academy remain, in the words of Cherniss, a 'riddle'. Yet surviving accounts of the views of the first two scholarchs of Plato's Academy after his death, Speusippus and Xenocrates, reveal a sophisticated engagement with their teacher's ideas concerning the pursuit of knowledge and the ends of philosophy. Speusippus and Xenocrates transform Plato's views on epistemology and happiness, and thereby help to lay the groundwork for the transformation of philosophy in the Hellenistic era.
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  4. Dyschereia and Aporia: The Formation of a Philosophical Term.Wei Cheng - 2018 - TAPA 148 (1):75-110.
    Plato’s nephew Speusippus has been widely accepted as the historical person behind the mask of the anti-hedonists in Phlb. 42b–44c. This hypothesis is supported by, inter alia, the link between Socrates’ char- acterization of them as δυσχερεῖς and the frequent references of δυσχέρεια as ἀπορία to Speusippus in Aristotle’s Metaphysics MN. This study argues against assigning any privileged status to Speusippus in the assimilation of δυσχέρεια with ἀπορία. Instead, based on a comprehensive survey of how δυσχερ- words were used in (...)
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  5. Speusippus. Speusippus of Athens: A Critical Study with a Collection of the Related Texts and Commentary. By Tarán. Leiden: Brill. 1981. Pp. Xxvii + 521. Fl. 244. [REVIEW]J. D. G. Evans - 1984 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 104:208-209.
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  6. Греческая арифмология: Пифагор или платон?Leonid Zhmud - 2017 - Schole 11 (2):428-459.
    This essay considers the origins of the arithmological genre, the first specimen of which was an anonymous Neopythagorean treatise of the first century BCE. Arithmology as a special genre of philosophical writings dealing with the properties of the first ten numbers should be distinguished from number symbolism, which is a universal cultural phenomenon related to individual significant numbers. As our analysis shows, the philosophical foundations of arithmology were laid down in the treatise of Plato’s successor Speusippus On Pythagorean Numbers, who (...)
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  7. Plato and Pythagoreanism.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2013 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Was Plato a Pythagorean? Plato's students and earliest critics thought so, but scholars since the nineteenth century have been more skeptical. With this probing study, Phillip Sidney Horky argues that a specific type of Pythagorean philosophy, called "mathematical" Pythagoreanism, exercised a decisive influence on fundamental aspects of Plato's philosophy. The progenitor of mathematical Pythagoreanism was the infamous Pythagorean heretic and political revolutionary Hippasus of Metapontum, a student of Pythagoras who is credited with experiments in harmonics that led to innovations in (...)
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Xenocrates
  1. Xenocrates and the Two-Category Scheme.Roberto Granieri - 2021 - Apeiron 54 (3):261-285.
    Simplicius reports that Xenocrates and Andronicus reproached Aristotle for positing an excessive number of categories, which can conveniently be reduced to two: τὰ καθ᾽αὑτά and τὰ πρός τι. Simplicius, followed by several modern commentators, interprets this move as being equivalent to a division into substance and accidents. I aim to show that, as far as Xenocrates is concerned, this interpretation is untenable and that the substance-accidents contrast cannot be equivalent to Xenocrates’ per se-relative one. Rather, Xenocrates aimed to stress the (...)
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  2. Speusippus and Xenocrates on the Pursuit and Ends of Philosophy.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2018 - In Harold Tarrant, Danielle Lane, Dirk Baltzly & François Tanguay Renaud (eds.), Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity. Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 29-45.
    The philosophical practices undertaken in Plato's Academy remain, in the words of Cherniss, a 'riddle'. Yet surviving accounts of the views of the first two scholarchs of Plato's Academy after his death, Speusippus and Xenocrates, reveal a sophisticated engagement with their teacher's ideas concerning the pursuit of knowledge and the ends of philosophy. Speusippus and Xenocrates transform Plato's views on epistemology and happiness, and thereby help to lay the groundwork for the transformation of philosophy in the Hellenistic era.
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  3. A New Fragment Of Xenocrates And Its Implications. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1962 - The Classical Review 12 (3):305-305.
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  4. Plato and Pythagoreanism.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2013 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Was Plato a Pythagorean? Plato's students and earliest critics thought so, but scholars since the nineteenth century have been more skeptical. With this probing study, Phillip Sidney Horky argues that a specific type of Pythagorean philosophy, called "mathematical" Pythagoreanism, exercised a decisive influence on fundamental aspects of Plato's philosophy. The progenitor of mathematical Pythagoreanism was the infamous Pythagorean heretic and political revolutionary Hippasus of Metapontum, a student of Pythagoras who is credited with experiments in harmonics that led to innovations in (...)
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  5. Theophrastus on Platonic and 'Pythagorean' Imitation.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (2):686-712.
    In the twenty-fourth aporia of Theophrastus' Metaphysics, there appears an important, if ‘bafflingly elliptical’, ascription to Plato and the ‘Pythagoreans’ of a theory of reduction to the first principles via ‘imitation’. Very little attention has been paid to the idea of Platonic and ‘Pythagorean’ reduction through the operation of ‘imitation’ as presented by Theophrastus in his Metaphysics. This article interrogates the concepts of ‘reduction’ and ‘imitation’ as described in the extant fragments of Theophrastus’ writings – with special attention to his (...)
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Old Academy, Misc
  1. Academica: Plato, Philip of Opus and the Pseudo-Platonic Epinomis.John Dillon & Leonardo Taran - 1980 - American Journal of Philology 101 (4):486.
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  2. The Context of Plato's Academy - (P.) Kalligas, (C.) Balla, (E.) Baziotopoulou-Valavani, (V.) Karasmanis (Edd.) Plato's Academy. Its Workings and its History. Pp. XII + 434, B/W & Colour Ills, B/W & Colour Maps. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020. Cased, £90, Us$120. Isbn: 978-1-108-42644-2. [REVIEW]Carol Atack - 2020 - The Classical Review 70 (2):344-347.
  3. Why the View of Intellect in De Anima I 4 Isn’T Aristotle’s Own.Caleb Cohoe - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (2):241-254.
    In De Anima I 4, Aristotle describes the intellect (nous) as a sort of substance, separate and incorruptible. Myles Burnyeat and Lloyd Gerson take this as proof that, for Aristotle, the intellect is a separate eternal entity, not a power belonging to individual humans. Against this reading, I show that this passage does not express Aristotle’s own views, but dialectically examines a reputable position (endoxon) about the intellect that seems to show that it can be subject to change. The passage’s (...)
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  4. The Platonic Origins of Stoic Theology.Francesco Ademollo - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 43:217-243.
  5. "Two Studies in the Early Academy", by R.M. Dancy. [REVIEW]John Dillon - 1993 - Ancient Philosophy 13 (2):433.
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  6. "Gott Und Das Böse in Antiken Platonismus", by Fritz-Peter Hager. [REVIEW]Lloyd P. Gerson - 1992 - Ancient Philosophy 12 (1):196.
  7. Unhinged: Kairos and the Invention of the Untimely.Robert Leston - 2013 - Atlantic Journal of Communication 21 (1):29-50.
    Traditionally, kairos has been seen as a “timely” concept, and so invention is said to emerge fromthe timeliness of a cultural and historical situation. But what if invention was thought of as thepotential to shift historical courses through the injection of something new or alien into a situation?This essay argues that kairos has not been able to free itself from its historical constraints becauseit has been bound to a human sense of temporality. By evolving along patterns different from print,the apparatus (...)
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  8. Theophrastus on Platonic and 'Pythagorean' Imitation.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (2):686-712.
    In the twenty-fourth aporia of Theophrastus' Metaphysics, there appears an important, if ‘bafflingly elliptical’, ascription to Plato and the ‘Pythagoreans’ of a theory of reduction to the first principles via ‘imitation’. Very little attention has been paid to the idea of Platonic and ‘Pythagorean’ reduction through the operation of ‘imitation’ as presented by Theophrastus in his Metaphysics. This article interrogates the concepts of ‘reduction’ and ‘imitation’ as described in the extant fragments of Theophrastus’ writings – with special attention to his (...)
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