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  1. A New Puzzle About Aristotelian Accidents.Tyler Huismann - 2021 - Metaphysics 4 (1):1-17.
    Aristotle gives a surprisingly broad menu of examples of something being accidental to something else. But the breadth of these examples seems to threaten a basic feature of accidentality, namely its asymmetry. ‘Accident’ has different senses, and one might think that that fact offers a way out, but some examples resist such an understanding. The best way forward, I argue, is to take accidentality to be contextual: relative to some context or condition, something might be accidental to something else; relative (...)
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  2. Secondary Substance and Quod Quid Erat Esse: Aquinas on Reconciling the Divisions of "Substance" in the Categories and Metaphysics.Elliot Polsky - forthcoming - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly.
    Modern commentators recognize the irony of Aristotle’s Categories becoming a central text for Platonic schools. For similar reasons, these commentators would perhaps be surprised to see Aquinas’s In VII Metaphysics, where he apparently identifies the secondary substance of Aristotle’s Categories with a false Platonic sense of “substance” as if, for Aristotle, only Platonists would say secondary substances are substances. This passage in Aquinas’s commentary has led Mgr. Wippel to claim that, for Aquinas, secondary substance and essence are not the same (...)
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  3. Aristotle on Geometrical Potentialities.Naoya Iwata - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (3):371-397.
  4. On the Epistemological Significance of Arguments From Non Transitive Similarity.Friedrich Wilhelm Grafe - 2021 - Archive.Org.
    This paper aims to argue for, else illustrate the epistemological significance of the use of non transitive similarity relations, mapping only to "types", as methodologically being on a par with the use of transitive similarity relations (equivalence relations), mapping as well to "predicates". -/- In this paper the sketch of an exact but simple geometrical model of the above construct is followed by mentioning respective use cases for non transitive similarity relations from science and humanities. A well known metaphysics example (...)
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  5. Biology and Theology in Aristotle's Theoretical and Practical Sciences.Monte Johnson - 2021 - In Sophia Connell (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Aristotle's Biology. Cambridge, UK: pp. 12-29.
    Biology and theology are interdependent theoretical sciences for Aristotle. In prominent discussions of the divine things (the stars and their unmoved movers) Aristotle appeals to the science of living things, and in prominent discussions of the nature of plants and animals Aristotle appeals to the nature of the divine. There is in fact a single continuous series of living things that includes gods, humans, animals, and plants, all of them in a way divine. Aristotle has this continuum of divine beings, (...)
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  6. Ancient.Phil Corkum - 2020 - In Michael J. Raven (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Metaphysical Grounding. New York: pp. 20-32.
    Is there grounding in ancient philosophy? To ask a related but different question: is grounding a useful tool for the scholar of ancient philosophy? These questions are difficult, and my goal in this paper is not so much to give definitive answers as to clarify the questions. I hope to direct the student of contemporary metaphysics towards passages where it may be fruitful to look for historical precedent. But I also hope to offer the student of ancient philosophy some guidance (...)
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  7. The Texture of Aristotle's Ontology.Tyler Huismann - forthcoming - Apeiron.
    The place of accidental unities in Aristotle’s ontology is often understood in terms of our concept of identity, with such unities held to be either identical with substances or not. I argue that this approach is misleading: Aristotle characterizes how they stand to one another using a different relation altogether, namely sameness. Once we take him at his word, a philosophically satisfying middle-path emerges.
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  8. Aristotle on Substance as Primary in Time.Wolfgang Sattler - forthcoming - Phronesis:1-19.
    In a notoriously obscure passage in Metaphysics 7.1 Aristotle claims that substance is primary in time. The only concrete literal interpretation suggested so far of this controversial claim is in terms of existing before and after in time. I argue that this interpretation faces serious problems. I then present a novel literal interpretation, in terms of being an appropriate subject of temporal predications, that is immune to these problems and strongly supported by philosophical and contextual considerations.
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  9. Relativity, Categories and Principles in the Divisio Aristotelea 67M/32DL.Roberto Granieri - forthcoming - Journal of Hellenic Studies.
    The Divisio Aristotelea 67M/32DL establishes a distinction between two categories of beings, per se and relatives. I defend three main theses. First, the relation of dependence characterizing the members of the πρός τι category is modal and symmetrical in nature and, accordingly, the per se-relatives contrast cannot be equivalent to the substance-accidents contrast. Second, the type of relativity relevant to this divisio is both ontological and semantic in nature (but with different emphases depending on the version of the divisio considered). (...)
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  10. Xenocrates and the Two-Category Scheme.Roberto Granieri - 2021 - Apeiron 54 (3):261-285.
    Simplicius reports that Xenocrates and Andronicus reproached Aristotle for positing an excessive number of categories, which can conveniently be reduced to two: τὰ καθ᾽αὑτά and τὰ πρός τι. Simplicius, followed by several modern commentators, interprets this move as being equivalent to a division into substance and accidents. I aim to show that, as far as Xenocrates is concerned, this interpretation is untenable and that the substance-accidents contrast cannot be equivalent to Xenocrates’ per se-relative one. Rather, Xenocrates aimed to stress the (...)
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  11. Relation is Not a Category: A Sketch of Relation as a Transcendental.Christopher V. Mirus - forthcoming - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association.
    Working within the Aristotelian tradition, I argue that relation is not a category but a transcendental property of being. By this I mean that all substances are actualized, and hence defined, relationally: all actuality is interactuality. Interactuality is the locus for the relational categories of substance, action, being-affected, number, and most types of quality. The interactuality of corporeal beings is further conditioned by relations of setting; here we find the relational categories of place (where), quantity in the sense of size, (...)
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  12. Aristotle’s Criticism of Pre-Socratic Natural Philosophy.Abduljaleel Alwali - 2006 - Amman, Jordan: Dar Al-Warraq.
    Aristotle (384-322 B.C), a well know Greek philosopher, physician, scientist and politician. A variety of identifying researches have been written on him. It is therefore a considerable pride for the researcher to write something about him when even mentioning his name and his father's name is a point of prestige in the Greek Language. His name means the preferable sublimity whereas Nicomachus (his father's name) means the definable negotiator. His father's and mother's origin belongs to Asclepiade, the favorite origin in (...)
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  13. Aristotle’s Theory of Bodies by Christian Pfeiffer. [REVIEW]Sean M. Costello - 2019 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review.
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  14. Measuring the Immeasurable Mind: Where Contemporary Neuroscience Meets the Aristotelian Tradition.Matthew Owen - 2021 - Lexington Books (Rowman & Littlefield).
    In Measuring the Immeasurable Mind: Where Contemporary Neuroscience Meets the Aristotelian Tradition, Matthew Owen argues that despite its nonphysical character, it is possible to empirically detect and measure consciousness. -/- Toward the end of the previous century, the neuroscience of consciousness set its roots and sprouted within a materialist milieu that reduced the mind to matter. Several decades later, dualism is being dusted off and reconsidered. Although some may see this revival as a threat to consciousness science aimed at measuring (...)
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  15. Two Dogmas That Many Readers of Aristotle’s Metaphysics Share.Sonderegger Erwin - manuscript
    Our everyday knowledge and the knowledge of the sciences are based on presuppositions of different fundamentality. The most general framework includes opinions about being, then the way a particular language sorts reality, precepts of logic, what Husserl called the natural attitude. Furthermore, specific content-related prerequisites and convictions are decisive in the individual sciences. Also modern readers of Aristotelian texts share some such specific convictions. I would like to speak of two of them here, since they are evidently false and considerably (...)
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  16. Speusippus, Teleology and the Metaphysics of Value: Theophrastus’ Metaphysics 11a18–26.Wei Cheng - 2020 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 140:143-175.
    This paper reexamines Theophrastus’ Metaphysics 11a18–26, an obscure testimony about Speusippus, the second head of the Platonic Academy. As opposed to the traditional interpretation, which takes this passage as Theophrastus’ polemic against Speusippus’ doctrine of value, I argue that he here dialectically takes advantage of, rather than launches an attack on, the Platonist. Based on this new reading, I further propose a revision and a reassessment of the ‘gloomy metaphysics’ of Speusippus which will shed new light on his ethics.
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  17. Aristole's Presuppositions About Change.George Boas - 1947 - American Journal of Philology 68 (4):404.
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  18. Presuppositions of Aristotle's Metaphysics.George Boas - 1934 - American Journal of Philology 55 (1):36.
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  19. Heidegger on the Unity of Metaphysics and the Method of Being and Time.Gilad Nir - 2021 - Review of Metaphysics 74 (3):361-396.
    The fundamental error of the metaphysical tradition, according to Heidegger, is the subordination of general ontology to the ontology of a special, exemplary entity (God, the soul, etc.). But Being and Time itself treats one kind of entity as exemplary, namely Dasein. Does this mean that Heidegger fails to free himself from the kind of metaphysics that he sought to criticize? To show how he avoids this charge I propose to examine the parallels between the methodology of Being and Time (...)
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  20. Hegel And Schelling on the Path of Aristotelian Ascent.Chandler D. Rogers - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (5):763-774.
    This essay argues that Schelling's late transition from Negative to Positive Philosophy constitutes a pointed inversion of the path of systematic ascent mapped by Hegel for the first time in the Phenomenology's Preface, which itself establishes Hegel's development out of and beyond Schelling's early philosophy; that a key notion to inspire the Hegelian vision articulated in the Preface returns to cap off the critique implicit in Schelling's late inversion, where this notion emerges from their divergent readings of Aristotle's Metaphysics; and (...)
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  21. Aristotle on Motion in Incomplete Animals.Daniel Coren - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (3):285-314.
    I explain what Aristotle means when, after puzzling about the matter of motion in incomplete animals, he suggests in De Anima III 11.433b31–434a5 that just as incomplete animals are moved indeterminately, desire and phantasia are present in those animals, but present indeterminately. I argue that self-motion and its directing faculties in incomplete animals differ in degree but not in kind from those of complete animals. I examine how an object of desire differs for an incomplete animal. Using a comparison with (...)
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  22. Mediated Predication in Aristotle's Categories.Patrick Grafton-Cardwell - forthcoming - Ancient Philosophy.
    I argue there are two ways predication relations can hold according to the Categories: they can hold directly or they can hold mediately. The distinction between direct and mediated predication is a distinction between whether or not a given prediction fact holds in virtue of another predication fact’s holding. We can tell Aristotle endorses this distinction from multiple places in the text where he licenses an inference from one predication fact’s holding to another predication fact’s holding. The best explanation for (...)
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  23. The Force of Existence. Looking for Spinoza in Heidegger.Kasper Lysemose - 2020 - Sophia 59 (1):139-172.
    In the perhaps most decisive reopening of philosophy in the twentieth century, Heidegger presented an existential analytic. This can be viewed as the highly complex analysis of one simple action: being-there. In the paper at hand, a Spinozist interpretation of this action is proposed. This implies a shift in the Aristotelian conceptuality, which, to a large extent, informs Heidegger’s analysis. The action of being-there is not a movement from potentiality to actuality. It is a force of existence. However, this force (...)
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  24. On the Intrinsic Value of Everything. [REVIEW]Edward N. Martin - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 84:251-261.
  25. On What There 'Is': Aristotle and the Aztecs on Being and Existence.Lynn Sebastian Purcell - 2018 - APA Newsletter on Hispanic/Latino Issues in Philosophy 18 (1):11-23.
    A curious feature of Aztec philosophy is that the basic metaphysical question of the “Western” tradition cannot be formulated in their language, in Nahuatl. This did not, however, prevent the Aztecs from developing an account of 'reality', or whatever it is that might exist. The article is the first of its kind to compare the work of Aristotle on ousia (being) and the Aztecs on teotl and ometeotl. Through this analysis, it suggests that both of the Nahuatl terms are fundamental (...)
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  26. Advancing the Aristotelian Project in Contemporary Metaphysics: A Review Essay.Robert C. Koons - 2019 - Philosophia Christi 21 (2):435-442.
    In a recent book, Substance and the Fundamentality of the Familiar, Ross Inman demonstrates the contemporary relevance of an Aristotelian approach to metaphysics and the philosophy of nature. Inman successfully applies the Aristotelian framework to a number of outstanding problems in metaphysics, philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of physics. Inman tackles some intriguing questions about the ontological status of proper parts, questions which constitute a central focus of ongoing debate and investigation.
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  27. Aristotle on Motion in Incomplete Animals.Daniel Coren - forthcoming - Apeiron: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science.
    I explain what Aristotle means when, after puzzling about the matter of motion in incomplete animals (those without sight, smell, hearing), he suggests in De Anima III 11.433b31-434a5 that just as incomplete animals are moved indeterminately, desire and phantasia are present in those animals, but present indeterminately. I argue that self-motion and its directing faculties in incomplete animals differ in degree but not in kind from those of complete animals. I examine how an object of desire differs for an incomplete (...)
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  28. Aristotle on Self-Change in Plants.Daniel Coren - 2019 - Rhizomata 7 (1):33-62.
    A lot of scholarly attention has been given to Aristotle’s account of how and why animals are capable of moving themselves. But no one has focused on the question, whether self-change is possible in plants on Aristotle’s account. I first give some context and explain why this topic is worth exploring. I then turn to Aristotle’s conditions for self-change given in Physics VIII.4, where he argues that the natural motion of the elements does not count as self-motion. I apply those (...)
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  29. Coming-to-Know as a Way of Coming-to-Be: Aristotle’s De Anima III.5.Michael Baur - 2011 - In Michael Baur & Robert Wood (eds.), Person, Being, and History: Essays in Honor of Kenneth L. Schmitz. Washington, DC, USA: pp. 77-102.
    This chapter argues that it is possible to identify, in the coming to be of knowledge, the three elements that Aristotle says are involved in any kind of coming to be whatsoever (viz., matter, form, and the generated composite object). Specifically, it is argued that in this schema the passive intellect (pathetikos nous) corresponds to the matter, the active intellect (poetikos nous) corresponds to the form, and the composite object corresponds to the mind as actually knowing.
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  30. Aristotle's Metaphysics; a Revised Text with Introduction and Commentary. By W. D. Ross. Vol. I, Pp. Clxvi + 366. Vol. II, Pp. 1–528. Clarendon Press, 1924. 48s. [REVIEW]B. H. - 1925 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 45 (1):141-142.
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  31. Die Philosophie des Aristoteles. Von Dr.Theol. E. Rolfes. Pp. vii + 380. Leipzig, Meiner: 1923. - Aristoteles Lehre vom Schiuse oder Erste Analytik. Pp. x + 209. Lehre vom Beweis oder Zweite Analytik. Pp. xviii + 164. Politik . Pp. xxxi + 341. Neu übersetzt von Dr.Theol. E. Rolfes. Leipzig: Meiner, 1922. - Aristoteles Über die Dichtkunst. Neu übersetzt von Alfred Gudeman. Pp. xxiv + 91. Leipzig: Meiner, 1921. [REVIEW]L. S. J. - 1924 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 44 (1):114-115.
  32. Graham Aristotle's Two Systems. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1987. Pp. Xv + 359. £33.00.William Charlton - 1989 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 109:234-235.
  33. The Doctrine of Being in the Aristotelian Metaphysics: A Study in the Greek Background of Mediaeval Thought. By J. Owens. Pp. Xii + 461. Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Thought, 1951. $5. [REVIEW]L. Minio-Paluello - 1953 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 73:159-159.
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  34. Bos Cosmic and Meta-Cosmic Theology in Aristotle's Lost Dialogues. Tr. A.P.Runia. Leiden: Brill, 1989. Pp. Xx + 242. Fl.120. [REVIEW]Stephen R. L. Clark - 1994 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 114:194-195.
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  35. Aristotle's Anthropology.Nora Kreft & Geert Keil (eds.) - 2019 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first collection of essays devoted specifically to the nature and significance of Aristotle's anthropological philosophy, covering the full range of his ethical, metaphysical and biological works. The book is organised into four parts, two of which deal with the metaphysics and biology of human nature and two of which discuss the anthropological foundations and implications of Aristotle's ethico-political works. The essay topics range from human nature and morality to friendship and politics, including original discussion and fresh perspectives (...)
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  36. Walter Leszl: Aristotle's Conception of Ontology. Pp. Xii + 558. Padua: Antenore, 1975. Paper.Pamela Huby - 1977 - The Classical Review 27 (2):291-291.
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  37. L. Delatte, C. Rutten, S. Govaerts, J. Denooz: Aristoteles, Metaphysica, Index Verborum, Listes de Fréquence. Pp. Xiii + 521. Hildesheim: Olms–Weidmann, 1984. DM. 118. [REVIEW]J. L. Ackrill - 1985 - The Classical Review 35 (2):386-386.
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  38. Die Formen des Guten nach Aristoteles.Falk Hamann - 2019 - In Falk Hamann & Peter Heuer (eds.), Die ontologischen Grundlagen der aristotelischen Ethik. Leipzig, Germany: pp. 153–177.
    In diesem Aufsatz diskutiere ich eine der Grundideen des aristotelischen Naturalismus – die auf Peter Geach zurückgehende These, dass der Ausdruck ‚gut‘ nur attributiv sinnvoll verwendet werden könne. Dieses Verständnis des Guten fokussiert einseitig auf den Kontext von Evaluationen und lässt damit den Zusammenhang von Güte und Streben außer Acht. Ich zeige, dass Aristoteles durchaus eine Klasse absoluter Güter kennt, die begrifflich nicht auf eine bestimmte Art von Lebewesen begrenzt sind und von denen mithin nicht nur im attributiven Sinn gesprochen (...)
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  39. Metaphysics Z.L1.1036b28: Αἰσθητόν or Αἰσθητικόν?Herbert Granger - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (2):415-423.
    MetaphysicsZ.ll has in recent years received considerable attention, because of its importance for the exposition of Aristotle's psychology, which for some time now has been an immensely popular topic among Aristotelian scholars. Z.ll has proved contentious, however, especially over its statement of Aristotle's criticism of Socrates the Younger, who was wont to make a certain ‘comparison’ in the case of animals. Virtually nothing is known about this Socrates the Younger, nor is it known exactly what ‘comparison’ he made with animals. (...)
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  40. M. Sim : The Crossroads of Norm and Nature: Essays on Aristotle’s Ethics and Metaphysics. Pp. Xxii + 343. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 1995. Cased, $55.00 . ISBN: 0-8476- 7939-X . - G. Freudenthal: Aristotle’s Theory of Material Substance: Heat and Pneuma, Form and Soul. Pp. Xii + 235. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1995. Cased, £30. ISBN: 0-19-824093-7. [REVIEW]Lucas Siorvanes - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (2):626-628.
  41. Politis Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Aristotle and the Metaphysics. Pp. X + 344. London and New York: Routledge, 2004. Paper, £10.99. ISBN: 0-415-25148-6. [REVIEW]Andrea Falcon - 2006 - The Classical Review 56 (2):303-306.
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  42. Gerson Aristotle and Other Platonists. Pp. Xii + 335. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 2005. Cased, US$49.95, £27.50. ISBN: 0-8014-4164-1. [REVIEW]George Boys-Stones - 2006 - The Classical Review 56 (1):61-62.
  43. Aristotle Metaphysics.Mirjam E. Kotwick - 2018 - Ancient Philosophy 38 (2):467-472.
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  44. Exploring Common Ground Between Integrated Information Theory and Aristotelian Metaphysics.Matthew Owen - 2019 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 26 (1-2):163-187.
    A leading contemporary theory of consciousness in theoretical neuroscience apparently shares significant common ground with a philosophical system of thought from Antiquity. Although chronologically disparate, the integrated information theory of consciousness and Aristotelian metaphysics seem to be akin with regards to fundamental ontology, epistemic priority, and causal powers. In this article, I explore these areas of common ground. Additionally, I consider an apparent dissimilarity regarding panpsychism and suggest that an Aristotelian understanding of powers provides a natural way for IIT to (...)
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  45. Critical Notice for Michail Peramatzis's Priority in Aristotle's Metaphysics, Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2011.Phil Corkum - 2013 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 43 (1):136-156.
    I discuss Peramatzis's argument that the form of a natural substance is essentially enmattered and so contains a material component.
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  46. Aristotle on Secondary Substance.John Robert Mahlan - 2019 - Apeiron 52 (2):167-197.
    At the beginning of Categories 5, Aristotle distinguishes between two kinds of substance: primary substance and secondary substance. Primary substances include particular living organisms, inanimate objects, and their parts. Secondary substances are the species and genera of these. This distinction is unique to the Categories, which raises the question of why Aristotle treats species and genera as substances. I argue that Aristotle has two distinct reasons for doing so, and contrast my interpretation with recent alternatives. On my view, species and (...)
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  47. The Razor Argument of Metaphysics A.9.José Edgar González-Varela - 2018 - Phronesis 63 (4):408-448.
    I discuss Aristotle’s opening argument against Platonic Forms in _Metaphysics_ A.9, ‘the Razor’, which criticizes the introduction of Forms on the basis of an analogy with a hypothetical case of counting things. I argue for a new interpretation of this argument, and show that it involves two interesting objections against the introduction of Forms as formal causes: one concerns the completeness and the other the adequacy of such an explanatory project.
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  48. Aristotle Against (Unqualified) Self-Motion: Physics VII 1 Α241b35-242a49 / Β241b25-242a15.Daniel Coren - forthcoming - Ancient Philosophy.
    It is well known that Aristotle tries to make room for self-motion – an idea he inherits to some extent from Plato – within his other commitments to causal determinism while at the same time modifying the idea. However, one argument in Physics VII 1 seems to pose a problem for the bare possibility of self-motion; in it he seems to argue that everything that moves must be moved by something else. The text in which this argument appears is itself (...)
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  49. The Causal Structure of Emotions in Aristotle: Hylomorphism, Causal Interaction Between Mind and Body, and Intentionality.Gabriela Rossi - 2018 - In Marcelo Boeri, Yasuhira Y. Kanayama & Jorge Mittelmann (eds.), Soul and Mind in Greek Thought. Psychologial Issues in Plato and Aristotle. Springer. pp. 177-198.
    Recently, a strong hylomorphic reading of Aristotelian emotions has been put forward, one that allegedly eliminates the problem of causal interaction between soul and body. Taking the presentation of emotions in de An. I 1 as a starting point and basic thread, but relying also on the discussion of Rh. II, I will argue that this reading only takes into account two of the four causes of emotions, and that, if all four of them are included into the picture, then (...)
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  50. Aristotle’s Resolution of the Aporia About Coming-To-Be in Physics I 8.Gabriela Rossi - 2017 - Eirene 53 (1):247-271.
    In Physica I,8 Aristotle endeavors to show that a long-term Eleatic puzzle about coming-to-be can be resolved by appealing to his own ontological principles of change (substratum, privation, and form). In this paper, I posit that the key to Aristotle’s resolution lies in the introduction of aspectual distinctions within numerical unities. These distinctions within the terminus a quo and the terminus as quem of coming-to-be made it possible for Aristotle to maintain, while answering the puzzle, that there is no coming-to-be (...)
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