Results for 'Derk Pereboom'

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  1. Precis of Derk Perebooms Free Will, Agency, and Meaning in Life.Gregg D. Caruso - 2014 - Science Religion and Culture 1 (3):178-201.
    Derk Perebooms Free Will, Agency, and Meaning in Life (2014) provides the most lively and comprehensive defense of free will skepticism in the literature. It contains a reworked and expanded version of the view he first developed in Living without Free Will (2001). Important objections to the early book are answered, some slight modifications are introduced, and the overall account is significantly embellished—for example, Pereboom proposes a new account of rational deliberation consistent with the belief that one’s actions (...)
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  2. Derk Pereboom, Ed., Free Will. [REVIEW]Clifford Williams - 1998 - Philosophy in Review 18:240-242.
     
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  3.  15
    Derk Pereboom, Free Will, Agency and Meaning in Life. [REVIEW]Sofia Jeppsson - 2018 - Utilitas 30 (2):241-244.
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  4. Derk Pereboom, Ed., Free Will Reviewed By.Clifford Williams - 1998 - Philosophy in Review 18 (4):240-242.
  5.  23
    An Evaluation of Derk Pereboom's Four-Case Argument.Mostofa N. Mansur - 2018 - Copula 35:16.
    Hard incompatibilism is a view which asserts that determinism and free will are inconsistent and given the facts of our best sciences determinism is true; and hence, free will does not exist. Not only that, it also claims that if the world were indeterministic and our actions were caused by states or events, still we would lack free will. In this way, it denies the truth of any libertarian account of free will based on event causation. In that sense, this (...)
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  6.  19
    Derk Pereboom, Consciousness and the Prospects of Physicalism. Reviewed By.Kevin Morris - 2012 - Philosophy in Review 32 (2):124-126.
  7.  6
    A Defense of Derk Pereboom’s Containment Policy.Jeremy Scharoun & Neil Campbell - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (5):1291-1307.
    Derk Pereboom disagrees with P.F. Strawson that abandoning the reactive attitudes associated with praise and blame would come at the price of exiting our personal relationships. According to Pereboom, we can contain or modify our attitudes in ways that preserve, and perhaps even enrich interpersonal relationships. In a recent article, Seth Shabo defends “the inseparability thesis” in order to undermine Pereboom’s containment policy. Drawing on David Goldman’s work on non-antagonistic responses to wrongdoing, we defend Pereboom (...)
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  8. Précis of Derk Pereboom’s Free Will, Agency, and Meaning in Life.Gregg Caruso - 2014 - Science, Religion and Culture 1 (3):178-201.
    Derk Pereboom’s Free Will, Agency, and Meaning in Life provides the most lively and comprehensive defense of free will skepticism in the literature. It contains a reworked and expanded version of the view he first developed in Living without Free Will. Important objections to the early book are answered, some slight modifications are introduced, and the overall account is significantly embellished—for example, Pereboom proposes a new account of rational deliberation consistent with the belief that one’s actions are (...)
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  9.  89
    Manipulation Arguments, Basic Desert, and Moral Responsibility: Assessing Derk Pereboom’s Free Will, Agency, and Meaning in Life.Michael McKenna - 2017 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 11 (3):575-589.
    In this paper I critically assess Derk Pereboom’s book, Free Will, Agency, and Meaning in Life. In it, I resist Pereboom’s manipulation argument for incompatibilism and his indictment of desert-based accounts of moral responsibility.
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  10. Hard Theological Determinism and the Illusion of Free Will: Sri Ramakrishna Meets Lord Kames, Saul Smilansky, and Derk Pereboom.Ayon Maharaj - 2018 - Journal of World Philosophies 3 (2):24-48.
    This essay reconstructs the sophisticated views on free will and determinism of the nineteenth-century Hindu mystic Sri Ramakrishna and brings them into dialogue with the views of three western philosophers—namely, the Scottish Enlightenment philosopher Lord Kames and the contemporary analytic philosophers Saul Smilansky and Derk Pereboom. Sri Ramakrishna affirms hard theological determinism, the incompatibilist view that God determines everything we do and think. At the same time, however, he claims that God, in His infinite wisdom, has endowed ordinary (...)
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  11.  17
    Review of Derk Pereboom, Living Without Free Will. [REVIEW]Timothy O'Connor - 2003 - Philosophical Quarterly 53 (210):308-310.
    Review of Derk Pereboom, Living Without Free Will.
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  12.  28
    Review of Derk Pereboom's Free Will, Agency, and Meaning in Life. [REVIEW]David Shoemaker - 2015 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews:xxx.
  13. Critical Notice: Consciousness and the Prospects of Physicalism, by Derk Pereboom.Derek Ball - 2014 - Analytic Philosophy 55 (1):118-129.
    Critical notice of Derk Pereboom's "Consciousness and the Prospects of Physicalism". Discusses Pereboom's idea that conscious states might be misrepresented in introspection, and his idea that instantiations of mental properties are composed of instantiations of physical properties.
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  14. Four Views on Free Will.John Martin Fischer, Robert Kane & Derk Pereboom Y. Manuel Vargas - 2007 - Critica 39 (117):96-109.
     
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  15. Book Review. Living Without Free Will. Derk Pereboom[REVIEW]Carl Ginet - 2002 - The Journal of Ethics 6 (3):305-309.
  16.  26
    Michael McKenna E Derk Pereboom, Free Will – A Contemporary Introduction, New York: Routledge, 2016, 330 Pp., ISBN 9781315621548. [REVIEW]José Guilherme B. A. Sutil - 2019 - Revista Filosófica de Coimbra 28 (56):500-510.
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  17. Living Without Free Will - Derk Pereboom[REVIEW]Giuliano Torrengo - 2011 - Humana Mente 4 (15).
  18.  20
    Living Without Free Will by Derk Pereboom.Carl Ginet - 2002 - The Journal of Ethics 6 (3):305-309.
  19.  58
    Review of Derk Pereboom Consciousness and the Prospects of Physicalism. [REVIEW]Tom McClelland - 2013 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (9-10):193-200.
  20. Free Will, Agency, and Meaning in Life.Derk Pereboom - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Derk Pereboom articulates and defends an original, forward-looking conception of moral responsibility. He argues that although we may not possess the kind of free will that is normally considered necessary for moral responsibility, this does not jeopardize our sense of ourselves as agents, or a robust sense of achievement and meaning in life.
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  21.  94
    Consciousness and The Prospects of Physicalism. By Derk Pereboom.Sam Coleman - 2013 - Philosophical Quarterly 63 (253):824-827.
    © 2013 The Editors of The Philosophical QuarterlyThis is a very good, very helpful book. In describing two possible outgrowths of contemporary physicalism, Pereboom performs a feat of time‐travel: he takes us forward to see the fruits ultimately to be produced by current seeds of thought. One of these branches—based on the ‘qualitative inaccuracy’ thesis—almost represents a parody of prevailing physicalist epistemic treatments of consciousness, to the extent that I can't shake the feeling that the book's first half may (...)
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  22.  19
    Review of Derk Pereboom's Living Without Free Will[REVIEW]Alfred R. Mele - 2003 - Mind 112 (446):375-378.
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  23.  28
    Review of Derk Pereboom, Living Without Free Will[REVIEW]Erik Carlson - 2002 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (1).
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  24.  37
    Four Views on Free Will. By John Martin Fischer, Robert Kane, Derk Pereboom, and Manuel Vargas.Hugo Meynell - 2011 - Heythrop Journal 52 (2):342-343.
  25. Living Without Free Will.Derk Pereboom - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    Most people assume that, even though some degenerative or criminal behavior may be caused by influences beyond our control, ordinary human actions are not similarly generated, but rather are freely chosen, and we can be praiseworthy or blameworthy for them. A less popular and more radical claim is that factors beyond our control produce all of the actions we perform. It is this hard determinist stance that Derk Pereboom articulates in Living Without Free Will. Pereboom argues that (...)
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  26. Four Views on Free Will. By John Martin Fischer, Robert Kane, Derk Pereboom, and Manuel Vargas.Anthony Dardis - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (1):147-153.
    Summary and brief critical evaluation of 4 views on free will (Kane, Fischer, Pereboom, Vargas).
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  27.  90
    Consciousness and the Prospects of Physicalism.Derk Pereboom - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    In this book, Derk Pereboom explores how physicalism might best be formulated and defended against the best anti-physicalist arguments. Two responses to the knowledge and conceivability arguments are set out and developed. The first exploits the open possibility that introspective representations fail to represent mental properties as they are in themselves; specifically, that introspection represents phenomenal properties as having certain characteristic qualitative natures, which these properties might actually lack. The second response draws on the proposal that currently unknown (...)
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  28.  36
    Free Will, Agency, and Meaning in Life, by Derk Pereboom: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, Pp. Vii + 219, £30.Soraj Hongladarom - 2015 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (2):411-412.
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  29.  39
    Review of John Martin Fischer, Robert Kane, Derk Pereboom, Manuel Vargas, Four Views on Free Will[REVIEW]Daniel Speak - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (5).
  30. Consciousness and the Prospects of Physicalism, by Derk Pereboom.T. Alter - 2012 - Mind 121 (484):1115-1122.
  31.  95
    Alternative Possibilities and Causal Histories.Derk Pereboom - 2000 - Philosopical Perspectives 14 (s14):119-138.
  32.  24
    Free Will, Agency, and Meaning in Life, by Derk Pereboom. New York: Oxford University Press.Matthew Talbert - 2016 - Mind 125 (497):248-252.
  33. Free Will Skepticism and Obligation Skepticism: Comments on Derk Pereboom’s Free Will Skepticism, Agency, and Meaning in Life.Dana Kay Nelkin - 2014 - Life, Science, Religion, Culture 1 (1).
     
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  34.  7
    Free Will, Agency, and Meaning in Life, Written by Derk Pereboom.David Rocheleau-Houle - 2017 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 14 (1):120-123.
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  35. John Martin Fischer, Robert Kane, Derk Pereboom y Manuel Vargas "Four Views on Free Will".Carlos G. Patarroyo Gutiérrez - 2007 - Critica 39 (117):96-109.
     
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  36.  21
    Free Will, Agency, and Meaning in Life, by Derk Pereboom[REVIEW]Leigh Vicens - 2015 - Faith and Philosophy 32 (2):230-235.
  37. John Martin Fischer, Robert Kane, Derk Pereboom, and Manuel Vargas, Four Views on Free Will. [REVIEW]Jason S. Miller - 2009 - Philosophical Review 118 (3):409-413.
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  38. Defending Hard Incompatibilism.Derk Pereboom - 2005 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 29 (1):228-247.
    In _Living Without Free Will_, I develop and argue for a view according to which our being morally responsible would be ruled out if determinism were true, and also if indeterminism were true and the causes of our actions were exclusively events.1 Absent agent causation, indeterministic causal histories are as threatening to moral responsibility as deterministic histories are, and a generalization argument from manipulation cases shows that deterministic histories indeed undermine moral responsibility. Agent causation has not been ruled out as (...)
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  39.  17
    Free Will.Derk Pereboom - 2013 - In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter analyses the problem of free will and moral responsibility, to which the history of philosophy records three standard reactions. Compatibilists maintain that it is possible for us to have the free will required for moral responsibility if determinism is true. Others contend that determinism is not compossible with our having the free will required for moral responsibility – they are incompatibilists – but they resist the reasons for determinism and claim that we do possess free will of this (...)
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  40.  70
    Libertarian Accounts of Free Will (Randolph Clarke). [REVIEW]Derk Pereboom - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 74 (1):269-272.
  41.  5
    Persons and Bodies: A Constitution View.Derk Pereboom - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (3):615-622.
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  42. A Hard-Line Reply to the Multiple-Case Manipulation Argument.Derk Pereboom - 2008 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (1):160-170.
  43.  68
    Reasons-Responsiveness, Alternative Possibilities, and Manipulation Arguments Against Compatibilism: Reflections on John Martin Fischer's My Way.Derk Pereboom - 2006 - Philosophical Books 47 (3):198-212.
  44. A Compatibilist Account of the Epistemic Conditions on Rational Deliberation.Derk Pereboom - 2008 - The Journal of Ethics 12 (3-4):287 - 306.
    A traditional concern for determinists is that the epistemic conditions an agent must satisfy to deliberate about which of a number of distinct actions to perform threaten to conflict with a belief in determinism and its evident consequences. I develop an account of the sort that specifies two epistemic requirements, an epistemic openness condition and a belief in the efficacy of deliberation, whose upshot is that someone who believes in determinism and its evident consequences can deliberate without inconsistent beliefs. I (...)
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  45.  22
    Defending Hard Incompatibilism.Derk Pereboom - 2005 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 29 (1):228-247.
  46.  43
    On Baker’s Persons and Bodies. [REVIEW]Derk Pereboom - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (3):615–622.
    1. Consider first Baker’s definition of constitution. In her view, constitution is a relation between concrete individuals. Each concrete individual is fundamentally a member of exactly one primary kind. By definition, any concrete individual has its primary kind membership essentially, so that a concrete individual x’s ceasing to be a member of this kind entails that x ceases to exist. For example, David’s primary kind is statue, Piece’s primary kind is piece of marble. Suppose that x and y are concrete (...)
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  47. Frankfurt Examples, Derivative Responsibility, and the Timing Objection1.Derk Pereboom - 2012 - Philosophical Issues 22 (1):298-315.
  48. On Alfred Mele's Free Will and Luck.Derk Pereboom - 2007 - Philosophical Explorations 10 (2):163 – 172.
    I argue that agent-causal libertarianism has a strong initial rejoinder to Mele's luck argument against it, but that his claim that it has yet to be explained how agent-causation yields responsibility-conferring control has significant force. I suggest an avenue of response. Subsequently, I raise objections to Mele's criticisms of my four-case manipulation argument against compatibilism.
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  49.  92
    A Defense of Free Will Skepticism: Replies to Commentaries by Victor Tadros, Saul Smilansky, Michael McKenna, and Alfred R. Mele on Free Will, Agency, and Meaning in Life.Derk Pereboom - 2017 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 11 (3):617-636.
    This paper features Derk Pereboom’s replies to commentaries by Victor Tadros and Saul Smilansky on his non-retributive, incapacitation-focused proposal for treatment of dangerous criminals; by Michael McKenna on his manipulation argument against compatibilism about basic desert and causal determination; and by Alfred R. Mele on his disappearing agent argument against event-causal libertarianism.
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  50. Hard-Incompatibilist Existentialism: Neuroscience, Punishment, and Meaning in Life.Derk Pereboom & Gregg D. Caruso - 2018 - In Gregg D. Caruso & Owen Flanagan (eds.), Neuroexistentialism: Meaning, Morals, and Purpose in the Age of Neuroscience. Oxford University Press.
    As philosophical and scientific arguments for free will skepticism continue to gain traction, we are likely to see a fundamental shift in the way people think about free will and moral responsibility. Such shifts raise important practical and existential concerns: What if we came to disbelieve in free will? What would this mean for our interpersonal relationships, society, morality, meaning, and the law? What would it do to our standing as human beings? Would it cause nihilism and despair as some (...)
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