Results for 'stem cell research'

1000+ found
Order:
See also
  1. Stem Cell Research and Same Sex Reproduction.Thomas Douglas, Catherine Harding, Hannah Bourne & Julian Savulescu - 2012 - In Muireann Quigley, Sarah Chan & John Harris (eds.), Stem Cells: New Frontiers in Science and Ethics. World Scientific.
    Recent advances in stem cell research suggest that in the future it may be possible to create eggs and sperm from human stem cells through a process that we term in vitro gametogenesis (IVG). IVG would allow treatment of some currently untreatable forms of infertility. It may also allow same-sex couples to have genetically-related children. For example, cells taken from one man could potentially be used to create an egg, which could then be fertilised using naturally (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  56
    Embryo Stem Cell Research: Ten Years of Controversy.John A. Robertson - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):191-203.
    Embryonic stem cell research has been a source of ethical, legal, and social controversy since the first successful culturing of human ESCs in the laboratory in 1998. The controversy has slowed the pace of stem cell science and shaped many aspects of its subsequent development. This paper assesses the main issues that have bedeviled stem cell progress and identifies the ethical fault lines that are likely to continue.The time is appropriate for such an (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  3. Stem Cell Research and the Problem of Embryonic Identity.Phillip Montague - 2011 - The Journal of Ethics 15 (4):307-319.
    A basic component of moral objections to embryonic stem cell research is the claim that human embryos have the same moral status as typical adult human beings. There is no reason to accept this claim, however, unless adult humans once existed as embryos—that is, unless the developmental history of adult humans contains embryos to which the adults are numerically identical. The purpose of this paper is to argue that there are no such identities, and hence that no (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4. Stem cell research, personhood and sentience.Lisa Bortolotti & John Harris - 2005 - Reproductive Biomedicine Online 10:68-75.
    In this paper the permissibility of stem cell research on early human embryos is defended. It is argued that, in order to have moral status, an individual must have an interest in its own wellbeing. Sentience is a prerequisite for having an interest in avoiding pain, and personhood is a prerequisite for having an interest in the continuation of one's own existence. Early human embryos are not sentient and therefore they are not recipients of direct moral consideration. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  5.  28
    Stem Cell Research as Innovation: Expanding the Ethical and Policy Conversation.Rebecca Dresser - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):332-341.
    In 1998, researchers established the first human embryonic stem cell line. Their scientific triumph triggered an ethics and policy argument that persists today. Bioethicists, religious leaders, government officials, patient advocates, and scientists continue to debate whether this research poses a promise, a threat, or a mixed ethical picture for society.Scientists are understandably excited about the knowledge that could come from studying human embryonic stem cells. Most of them believe these cells offer a precious opportunity to learn (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  6.  63
    Stem Cell Research and Economic Promises.Timothy Caulfield - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):303-313.
    In the context of stem cell research, the promise of economic growth has become a common policy argument for adoption of permissive policies and increased government funding. However, declarations of economic and commercial benefit, which can be found in policy reports, the scientific literature, public funding policies, and the popular press, have arguably created a great deal of expectation. Can stem cell research deliver on the economic promise? And what are the implications of this (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  7.  12
    Stem Cell Research and Economic Promises.Timothy Caulfield - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):303-313.
    Policy arguments in support of stem cell research often use economic benefit as a key rationale for permissive policies and increased government funding. Economic growth, job creation, improved productivity, and a reduction in the burden of disease are all worthy goals and, as such, can be used as powerful rhetorical tools in efforts to sway voters, politicians, and funding agencies. However, declarations of economic and commercial benefit — which can be found in policy reports, the scientific literature, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  8.  67
    Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: Ethical Views of Buddhist, Hindu and Catholic Leaders in Malaysia.Mathana Amaris Fiona Sivaraman & Siti Nurani Mohd Noor - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (2):467-485.
    Embryonic Stem Cell Research raises ethical issues. In the process of research, embryos may be destroyed and, to some, such an act entails the ‘killing of human life’. Past studies have sought the views of scientists and the general public on the ethics of ESCR. This study, however, explores multi-faith ethical viewpoints, in particular, those of Buddhists, Hindus and Catholics in Malaysia, on ESCR. Responses were gathered via semi-structured, face-to-face interviews. Three main ethical quandaries emerged from (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  9. Stem Cell Research as Innovation: Expanding the Ethical and Policy Conversation.Rebecca Dresser - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):332-341.
    Research using human embryonic stem cells raises an array of complex ethical issues, including, but by no means limited to, the moral status of developing human life. Unfortunately much of the public discussion fails to take into account this complexity. Advocacy for liberal and conservative positions on human embryonic stem cell research can be simplistic and misleading. Ethical concepts such as truth-telling, scientific integrity, and social justice should be part of the debate over federal support (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  10. stem Cell Research And Respect For Life.Ronnie Hawkins - 2001 - Florida Philosophical Review 1 (1):49-62.
    This paper queries why we are more reluctant to perform stem cell research on human than on nonhuman embryos, given their remarkable similarities together with the former's greater promise for addressing human illnesses. I begin by examining two leading arguments for prohibiting stem cell research on human embryos. The first type of argument suggests that we should not interfere with the potential for human life. This argument, advanced in different ways by both utilitarians and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  31
    Regulating stem cell research in Europe by the back door.S. Holm - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (4):203-204.
    Regulation of stem cell research in Europe should not take place without public and scholarly inputThe European Union has, at present, no jurisdiction over research carried out in the member states, or concerning the “ethics” of member states. This does not, however, mean that decisions made by the European institutions cannot influence such matters greatly.There has recently been a lot of focus on the decision not to fund embryonic stem cell research during the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  75
    Embryo Stem Cell Research: Ten Years of Controversy.John A. Robertson - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):191-203.
    This overview of 10 years of stem cell controversy reviews the moral conflict that has made ESCs so controversial and how this conflict plays itself out in the legal realm, focusing on the constitutional status of efforts to ban ESC research or ESC-derived therapies. It provides a history of the federal funding debate from the Carter to the Obama administrations, and the importance of the Raab memo in authorizing federal funding for research with privately derived ESCs (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  13.  35
    Translating Stem Cell Research: Challenges at the Research Frontier.David Magnus - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):267-276.
    There are many kinds of clinical trials. The regulatory framework within which most drug development takes place appears to be the one that is to be applied to the development of novel stem cell-based clinical trials. In the standard drug development model, appropriate pre-clinical research is conducted, and investigators or research sponsors submit an investigational new drug application to the Food and Drug Administration.If approved, typical clinical trials start with Phase I, which is usually a trial (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  14.  96
    Stem cell research in Germany: Ethics of healing vs. human dignity. [REVIEW]Fuat S. Oduncu - 2003 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (1):5-16.
    On 25 April 2002, the German Parliament has passed a strict new law referring to stem cell research. This law took effect on July 1, 2002. The so-called embryonic Stem Cell Act ( Stammzellgesetz — StZG ) permits the import of embryonic stem (ES) cells isolated from surplus IvF-embryos for research reasons. The production itself of ES cells from human blastocysts has been prohibited by the German Embryo Protection Act of 1990, with the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  15. Developments in stem cell research and therapeutic cloning: Islamic ethical positions, a review.Hossam E. Fadel - 2010 - Bioethics 26 (3):128-135.
    Stem cell research is very promising. The use of human embryos has been confronted with objections based on ethical and religious positions. The recent production of reprogrammed adult (induced pluripotent) cells does not – in the opinion of scientists – reduce the need to continue human embryonic stem cell research. So the debate continues.Islam always encouraged scientific research, particularly research directed toward finding cures for human disease. Based on the expectation of potential (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  16.  33
    Stem Cell Research: A Target Article Collection Part I - Jordan's Banks, A View from the First Years of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research.Laurie Zoloth - 2002 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (1):3-11.
    This essay will address the ethical issues that have emerged in the first considerations of the newly emerging stem cell technology. Many of us in the field of bioethics were deliberating related issues as we first learned of the new science and confronted the ethical issues it raised. In this essay, I will draw on the work of colleagues who were asked to reflect on early stages of the research as the field debated the issues of consent, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  17.  15
    Stem Cell Research: The New Lego Of Life.Ch Byk - 2001 - Global Bioethics 14 (2-3):33-46.
    Although the prohibition of human cloning for reproductive purposes has been proclaimed internationally, embryo stem cell research is progressively considered as a positive field for future therapeutical developments. Implicitly cloning is then becoming a tool which allows the creation of new forms of life, including human life.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  23
    Stem Cell Research: The Ethical Issues.Lori Gruen, Laura Grabel & Peter Singer (eds.) - 2008 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    In this timely collection, some of the world's leading ethicists grapple with the variety of issues posed by human embryonic stem cell research. Investigates the moral status of the embryo including the creation of chimeras and paying for gametes (eggs and sperm) and embryos for research purposes Provides a thorough evaluation of the ethics and politics of regulating hESC research, and the privacy, confidentiality, and informed consent in the conduct of research and clinical investigations (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19. Stem cell research in the U.s. After the president's speech of August 2001.Cynthia B. Cohen - 2004 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (1):97-114.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14.1 (2004) 97-114 [Access article in PDF] Stem Cell Research in the U.S. after the President's Speech of August 2001 Cynthia B. Cohen On 9 August 2001, in a nationally televised speech, President Bush addressed the contentious question of whether to provide federal funds for human embryonic stem cell research (White House 2001).1 This research involves taking (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20.  33
    Embryonic Stem Cell Research and Therapy: The Need for a Common European Legal Framework.Carlos M. Romeo–Casabona - 2002 - Bioethics 16 (6):557-567.
    The possibility of obtaining stem cells from human embryos has given rise to an intensive legal and ethical debate. In this paper, attention is paid to the normative disparity and ambiguity in Europe. An argument for the need for a minimal legal harmonization is made; and a prudent and flexible way to reach this successfully is suggested. Establishing a common legal framework seems to be the only way to guarantee true competitiveness for the European scientific community.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  21.  95
    Embryonic Stem Cell Research: A Pragmatic Roman Catholic's Defense.R. Whittington - 2012 - Christian Bioethics 18 (3):235-251.
    The potential benefits of embryonic stem cell research have been clarified by the last ten years of research so that it is necessary to re-examine the foundations for the restrictions imposed on this research. Those who believe that life begins at the moment of fertilization and is imbued with a full complement of human rights have opposed all embryonic research. As one who accepts this premise, I will demonstrate that there are certain limited circumstances (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22.  52
    Animal Eggs for Stem Cell Research: A Path Not Worth Taking.Françoise Baylis - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (12):18-32.
    In January 2008, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority issued two 1-year licenses for cytoplasmic hybrid embryo research. This article situates the HFEA's decision in its wider scientific and political context in which, until quite recently, the debate about human embryonic stem cell research has focused narrowly on the moral status of the developing human embryo. Next, ethical arguments against crossing species boundaries with humans are canvassed. Finally, a new argument about the risks of harm to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  23. Stem Cell Research on Embryonic Persons Is Just.Aaron Rizzieri - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (2):195-203.
    I argue that embryonic stem cell research is fair to the embryo, even on the assumption that the embryo has attained full personhood and an attendant right to life at conception. This is because the only feasible alternatives open to the embryo are to exist briefly in an unconscious state and be killed or to not exist at all. Hence, one is neither depriving the embryo of an enduring life it would otherwise have had nor is one (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24.  57
    Human embryonic stem cell research: Why the discarded-created-distinction cannot be based on the potentiality argument.Katrien Devolder - 2005 - Bioethics 19 (2):167-186.
    Discussions about the use and derivation of pluripotent human embryonic stem cells are a stumbling block in developing public policy on stem cell research. On the one hand there is a broad consensus on the benefits of these cells for science and biomedicine; on the other hand there is the controversial issue of killing human embryos. I will focus on the compromise position that accepts research on spare embryos, but not on research embryos ('discarded-created-distinction', (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  25.  58
    Stem cell research on other worlds, or why embryos do not have a right to life.R. Blackford - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (3):177-180.
    Anxieties about the creation and destruction of human embryos for the purpose of scientific research on embryonic stem cells have given a new urgency to the question of whether embryos have moral rights. This article uses a thought experiment involving two possible worlds, somewhat removed from our own in the space of possibilities, to shed light on whether early embryos have such rights as a right not to be destroyed or discarded . It is argued that early embryos (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26.  16
    Embryonic Stem Cell Research and Therapy: The Need for a Common European Legal Framework.Carlos M. Romeo&Ndashcasabona - 2002 - Bioethics 16 (6):557-567.
    The possibility of obtaining stem cells from human embryos has given rise to an intensive legal and ethical debate. In this paper, attention is paid to the normative disparity and ambiguity in Europe. An argument for the need for a minimal legal harmonization is made; and a prudent and flexible way to reach this successfully is suggested. Establishing a common legal framework seems to be the only way to guarantee true competitiveness for the European scientific community.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  27.  83
    Donating Embryos to Stem Cell Research: The “Problem” of Gratitude.Jackie Leach Scully, Erica Haimes, Anika Mitzkat, Rouven Porz & Christoph Rehmann-Sutter - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):19-28.
    This paper is based on linked qualitative studies of the donation of human embryos to stem cell research carried out in the United Kingdom, Switzerland, and China. All three studies used semi-structured interview protocols to allow an in-depth examination of donors’ and non-donors’ rationales for their donation decisions, with the aim of gaining information on contextual and other factors that play a role in donor decisions and identifying how these relate to factors that are more usually included (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  28.  31
    Respecting human embryos within stem cell research: Seeking harmony.Bertha Alvarez Manninen - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):226-244.
    Many medical‐ethics advisory boards have concluded that human embryonic stem cell research can be conducted in an ethical manner. Yet, almost all the recommendations of the ethics advisory boards have included a rather obscure requirement: the embryos that are to be destroyed for stem cell research must be treated with profound respect. In none of these recommendations, however, do we see an adequate explanation of what proper respect for human embryos actually entails. In this (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29. Muslim perspectives on stem cell research and cloning.Fatima Agha Al-Hayani - 2008 - Zygon 43 (4):783-795.
    In Islam, the acquisition of knowledge is a form of worship. But human achievement must be exercised in conformity with God's will. Warnings against feelings of superiority often are coupled with the command to remain within the confines of God's laws and limits. Because of the fear of arrogance and disregard of the balance created by God, any new knowledge or discovery must be applied with careful consideration to maintaining balance in the creation. Knowledge must be applied to ascertain equity (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  30.  33
    The Ethics of Embryonic Stem Cell Research.Katrien Devolder - 2015 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    Embryonic stem cell research holds great promise for biomedical research, but involves the destruction of human embryos. Katrien Devolder explores the tension between the view that embryos should never be deliberately harmed, and the view that such research must go forward. She provides an in-depth analysis of major attempts to resolve the problem.
  31.  19
    The Italian Way to Stem Cell Research: Rethinking the Role of Catholic Religion in Shaping Italian Stem Cell Research Regulations.Lorenzo Beltrame - 2017 - Developing World Bioethics 17 (3):157-166.
    Stem cell research regulations are highly variable across nations, notwithstanding shared and common ethical concerns. Dominant in political debates has been the so-called embryo question. However, the permissibility of human embryonic stem cell research varies among national regulatory frameworks. Scholars have explained differences by resorting to notions of political culture, traditions of ethical reasoning, discursive strategies and political manoeuvring of involved actors. Explanations based on the role of religion or other cultural structural variables are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  62
    Stem cell research in a catholic institution: Yes or no?Michael R. Prieur, Joan Atkinson, Laurie Hardingham, David Hill, Gillian Kernaghan, Debra Miller, Sandy Morton, Mary Rowell, John F. Vallely & Suzanne Wilson - 2006 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 16 (1):73-98.
    : Catholic teaching has no moral difficulties with research on stem cells derived from adult stem cells or fetal cord blood. The ethical problem comes with embryonic stem cells since their genesis involves the destruction of a human embryo. However, there seems to be significant promise of health benefits from such research. Although Catholic teaching does not permit any destruction of human embryos, the question remains whether researchers in a Catholic institution, or any researchers opposed (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33. Stem cell research: An ethical evaluation of policy options.Nikolaus Knoepffler - 2004 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (1):55-74.
    : In February 2004, South Korean researchers became the first in the world to successfully harvest stem cells and establish a stem cell line from a cloned human embryo. This is just one of eight possible policy options concerning human embryonic stem cell research. In practice, every kind of stem cell research can be done in one country or another. This paper evaluates the eight policy options concerning human embryonic stem (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  34. Killing embryos for stem cell research.Jeff Mcmahan - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):170–189.
    The main objection to human embryonic stem cell research is that it involves killing human embryos, which are essentially beings of the same sort that you and I are. This objection presupposes that we once existed as early embryos and that we had the same moral status then that we have now. This essay challenges both those presuppositions, but focuses primarily on the first. I argue first that these presuppositions are incompatible with widely accepted beliefs about both (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  35.  72
    Stem cell research: A target article collection part I - Jordan's Banks, a view from the first years of human embryonic stem cell research.Laurie Zoloth - 2002 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (1):3 – 11.
    This essay will address the ethical issues that have emerged in the first considerations of the newly emerging stem cell technology. Many of us in the field of bioethics were deliberating related issues as we first learned of the new science and confronted the ethical issues it raised. In this essay, I will draw on the work of colleagues who were asked to reflect on early stages of the research (members of the IRBs, the Geron Ethicist Advisory (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36.  60
    Stem cell research: A target article collection part II - what's in a name: Embryos, clones, and stem cells.Jane Maienschein - 2002 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (1):12 – 19.
    In 2001, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the "Human Cloning Prohibition Act" and President Bush announced his decision to allow only limited research on existing stem cell lines but not on "embryos." In contrast, the U.K. has explicitly authorized "therapeutic cloning." Much more will be said about bioethical, legal, and social implications, but subtleties of the science and careful definitions of terms have received much less consideration. Legislators and reporters struggle to discuss "cloning," "pluripotency," "stem (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  37.  78
    “Just one animal among many?” Existential phenomenology, ethics, and stem cell research.Norman K. Swazo - 2010 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (3):197-224.
    Stem cell research and associated or derivative biotechnologies are proceeding at a pace that has left bioethics behind as a discipline that is more or less reactionary to their developments. Further, much of the available ethical deliberation remains determined by the conceptual framework of late modern metaphysics and the correlative ethical theories of utilitarianism and deontology. Lacking, to any meaningful extent, is a sustained engagement with ontological and epistemological critiques, such as with “postmodern” thinking like that of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  54
    Muslim Perspectives on Stem Cell Research and Cloning.Fatima Agha Al-Hayani, Jacques Arnould, Ian G. Barbour, Marc Bekoff, Sjoerd L. Bonting, David Bradnick, Don Browning, John J. Carvalho Iv, Philip Clayton & Joseph K. Cosgrove - 2008 - Zygon 43 (4):783-795.
    Abstract.In Islam, the acquisition of knowledge is a form of worship. But human achievement must be exercised in conformity with God's will. Warnings against feelings of superiority often are coupled with the command to remain within the confines of God's laws and limits. Because of the fear of arrogance and disregard of the balance created by God, any new knowledge or discovery must be applied with careful consideration to maintaining balance in the creation. Knowledge must be applied to ascertain equity (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  39.  20
    Stem Cell Research: A Target Article Collection Part II - What's in a Name: Embryos, Clones, and Stem Cells.Jane Maienschein - 2002 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (1):12-19.
    In 2001, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the "Human Cloning Prohibition Act" and President Bush announced his decision to allow only limited research on existing stem cell lines but not on "embryos." In contrast, the U.K. has explicitly authorized "therapeutic cloning." Much more will be said about bioethical, legal, and social implications, but subtleties of the science and careful definitions of terms have received much less consideration. Legislators and reporters struggle to discuss "cloning," "pluripotency," "stem (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40.  41
    Stem cell research: A target article collection part III - determining moral status.Ronald M. Green - 2002 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (1):20 – 30.
    In this chapter, I review some of the background thinking concerning matters of moral status that I had developed in previous years and that I would now bring to the work of the Human Embryo Research Panel. Two ideas were at the forefront of my thinking. First, that biology usually offers not decisive "events" but only continuous processes of development. Second, in making status determinations we do not so much "identify" a point on a developmental continuum where moral respect (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  41.  37
    An Ethical Framework for Stem Cell Research in the European Union.John Harris, Lisa Bortolotti & Louise Irving - 2005 - Health Care Analysis 13 (3):157-162.
    Paper providing an ethical framework for stem cell research in Europe.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. The ethics of embryonic stem cell research.Howard J. Curzer - 2004 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (5):533 – 562.
    In this article I rebut conservative objections to five phases of embryonic stem cell research. I argue that researchers using existing embryonic stem cell lines are not complicit in the past destruction of embryos because beneficiaries of immoral acts are not necessary morally tainted. Second, such researchers do not encourage the destruction of additional embryos because fertility clinics presently destroy more spare embryos than researchers need. Third, actually harvesting stem cells from slated-to-be-discarded embryos is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  43.  59
    Human embryonic stem cell research: Why the discarded‐created‐distinction cannot be based on the potentiality argument.Katrien Devolder - 2005 - Bioethics 19 (2):167-186.
    Discussions about the use and derivation of pluripotent human embryonic stem cells are a stumbling block in developing public policy on stem cell research. On the one hand there is a broad consensus on the benefits of these cells for science and biomedicine; on the other hand there is the controversial issue of killing human embryos. I will focus on the compromise position that accepts research on spare embryos, but not on research embryos (‘discarded‐created‐distinction’, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  44.  4
    Stem Cell Research.Glenn McGee, Arthur Caplan & Gilbert Meilaender - 2001 - Hastings Center Report 31 (5):4.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  2
    Stem cell research.Marquis Don - 2002 - Free Inquiry 23 (1):40.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46.  64
    Rescuing human embryonic stem cell research: The possibility of embryo reconstitution after stem cell derivation.Katrien Devolder & Christopher M. Ward - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):245–263.
    We discuss in this essay the alternative techniques proposed for the isolation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) that attempt to satisfy moral issues surrounding killing embryos but show that these techniques are either redundant or do not achieve their intended aim. We discuss the difficulties associated with defining a human embryo and how the lack of clarity on this issue antagonises the ethical debate and impedes hESC research. We present scientific evidence showing that isolation of hESCs does (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47. Rescuing human embryonic stem cell research: The blastocyst transfer method.S. Matthew Liao - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (6):8 – 16.
    Despite the therapeutic potential of human embryonic stem (HES) cells, many people believe that HES cell research should be banned. The reason is that the present method of extracting HES cells involves the destruction of the embryo, which for many is the beginning of a person. This paper examines a number of compromise solutions such as parthenogenesis, the use of defective embryos, genetically creating a "pseudo embryo" that can never form a placenta, and determining embryo death, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  48. Donating Fresh Versus Frozen Embryos to Stem Cell Research: In Whose Interests?Carolyn Mcleod & Françoise Baylis - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (9):465–477.
    Some stem cell researchers believe that it is easier to derive human embryonic stem cells from fresh rather than frozen embryos and they have had in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinicians invite their infertility patients to donate their fresh embryos for research use. These embryos include those that are deemed 'suitable for transfer' (i.e. to the woman's uterus) and those deemed unsuitable in this regard. This paper focuses on fresh embryos deemed suitable for transfer - hereafter 'fresh (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  49. How is the ethics of stem cell research different from the ethics of abortion?Elizabeth Harman - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):207–225.
    It seems that if abortion is permissible, then stem cell research must be as well: it involves the death of a less significant thing (an embryo rather than a fetus) for a greater good (lives saved rather than nine months of physical imposition avoided). However, I argue in this essay that this natural thought is mistaken. In particular, on the assumption that embryos and fetuses have the full moral status of persons, abortion is permissible but one form (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50. Human embryonic stem cell research: An intercultural perspective.LeRoy Walters - 2004 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (1):3-38.
    : In 1998, researchers discovered that embryonic stem cells could be derived from early human embryos. This discovery has raised a series of ethical and public-policy questions that are now being confronted by multiple international organizations, nations, cultures, and religious traditions. This essay surveys policies for human embryonic stem cell research in four regions of the world, reports on the recent debate at the United Nations about one type of such research, and reviews the positions (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000