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  1. Enhancing Evolution: The Ethical Case for Making Better People.John Harris - 2007 - Princeton University Press.
    In Enhancing Evolution, leading bioethicist John Harris dismantles objections to genetic engineering, stem-cell research, designer babies, and cloning and makes an ethical case for biotechnology that is both forthright and rigorous. Human enhancement, Harris argues, is a good thing--good morally, good for individuals, good as social policy, and good for a genetic heritage that needs serious improvement. Enhancing Evolution defends biotechnological interventions that could allow us to live longer, healthier, and even happier lives by, for example, providing us with immunity (...)
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  2. Moral enhancement and freedom.John Harris - 2010 - Bioethics 25 (2):102-111.
    This paper identifies human enhancement as one of the most significant areas of bioethical interest in the last twenty years. It discusses in more detail one area, namely moral enhancement, which is generating significant contemporary interest. The author argues that so far from being susceptible to new forms of high tech manipulation, either genetic, chemical, surgical or neurological, the only reliable methods of moral enhancement, either now or for the foreseeable future, are either those that have been in human and (...)
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  3. The value of life.John Harris - 1985 - Boston: Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    This book, like the practice of medicine itself, is about the value of life. Health care is one of the clearest and most visible expressions of a society's ...
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  4.  21
    How to Be Good: The Possibility of Moral Enhancement.John Harris - 2016 - Oxford: Oxford University Press UK.
    Knowing how to be good, or knowing how to go about trying to be good, is of immense theoretical and practical importance. And what goes for trying to be good oneself, goes also for trying to provide others with ways of being good, and for trying to make them good whether they like it or not. This is what is meant by 'moral enhancement'. John Harris explores the many proposed methodologies or technologies for moral enhancement: traditional ones like good parenting (...)
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  5. Towards responsible use of cognitive-enhancing drugs by the healthy.Henry Greely, Barbara Sahakian, John Harris, Ronald Kessler, Gazzaniga C., Campbell Michael, Farah Philip & J. Martha - 2008 - Nature 456:702-705.
  6. The Survival Lottery.John Harris - 1975 - Philosophy 50 (191):81 - 87.
  7. The Value of Life.John Harris - 1985 - Mind 95 (380):533-535.
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  8. Clones, Genes, and Immortality: Ethics and the Genetic Revolution.John Harris - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
    In this retitled and revised version of Harris's original text Wonderwoman and Superman, the author discusses the ethics of human biotechnology and its implications relative to human evolution and destiny.
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  9. Wonderwoman and Superman: the ethics of human biotechnology.John Harris - 1992 - Oxford University Press.
    Since the birth of the first test-tube baby, Louise Brown, in 1977, we have seen truly remarkable advances in biotechnology. We can now screen the fetus for Down Syndrome, Spina Bifida, and a wide range of genetic disorders. We can rearrange genes in DNA chains and redirect the evolution of species. We can record an individual's genetic fingerprint. And we can potentially insert genes into human DNA that will produce physical warning signs of cancer, allowing early detection. In fact, biotechnology (...)
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  10.  12
    The Value of Life: An Introduction to Medical Ethics.John Harris - 1985 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 49 (4):699-700.
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  11. The Value of Life: An Introduction to Medical Ethics.John Harris - 1985 - Boston: Routledge.
    First published in 1985. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
  12. ‘Ethics is for bad guys!’ Putting the ‘moral’ into moral enhancement.John Harris - 2012 - Bioethics 27 (3):169-173.
  13. Germline Manipulation and Our Future Worlds.John Harris - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (12):30-34.
    Two genetic technologies capable of making heritable changes to the human genome have revived interest in, and in some quarters a very familiar panic concerning, so-called germline interventions. These technologies are: most recently the use of CRISPR/Cas9 to edit genes in non-viable IVF zygotes and Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy the use of which was approved in principle in a landmark vote earlier this year by the United Kingdom Parliament. The possibility of using either of these techniques in humans has encountered the (...)
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  14.  91
    Germline Modification and the Burden of Human Existence.John Harris - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (1):6-18.
  15.  37
    Why Kill the Cabin Boy?John Harris - 2021 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 30 (1):4-9.
    The task of combatting and defeating Covid-19 calls for drastic measures as well as cool heads. It also requires that we keep our nerve and our moral integrity. In the fight for survival, as individuals and as societies, we must not lose our grip on the values and the compassion that make individual and collective survival worth fighting for, or indeed worth having.1.
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  16. Enhancements Are A Moral Obligation.John Harris - 2010 - In Julian Savulescu & Nick Bostrom (eds.), Human Enhancement. Oxford University Press.
    Sobre Filosofia clinica e Reflexões sobre o que é o humano.
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  17.  59
    One principle and three fallacies of disability studies.John Harris - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (6):383-387.
    My critics in this symposium illustrate one principle and three fallacies of disability studies. The principle, which we all share, is that all persons are equal and none are less equal than others. No disability, however slight, nor however severe, implies lesser moral, political or ethical status, worth or value. This is a version of the principle of equality. The three fallacies exhibited by some or all of my critics are the following: Choosing to repair damage or dysfunction or to (...)
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  18. Multiplex parenting: IVG and the generations to come.César Palacios-González, John Harris & Giuseppe Testa - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (11):752-758.
    Recent breakthroughs in stem cell differentiation and reprogramming suggest that functional human gametes could soon be created in vitro. While the ethical debate on the uses of in vitro generated gametes (IVG) was originally constrained by the fact that they could be derived only from embryonic stem cell lines, the advent of somatic cell reprogramming, with the possibility to easily derive human induced pluripotent stem cells from any individual, affords now a major leap in the feasibility of IVG derivation and (...)
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  19.  83
    On Cloning.John Harris - 2004 - Routledge.
    Cloning - few words have as much potential to grip our imagination or grab the headlines. No longer the stuff of science fiction or Star Wars - it is happening now. Yet human cloning is currently banned throughout the world, and therapeutic cloning banned in many countries. In this highly controversial book, John Harris does a lot more than ask why we are so afraid of cloning. He presents a deft and informed defence of human cloning, carefully exposing the rhetorical (...)
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  20.  55
    Consent and end of life decisions.John Harris - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (1):10-15.
    This paper discusses the role of consent in decision making generally and its role in end of life decisions in particular. It outlines a conception of autonomy which explains and justifies the role of consent in decision making and criticises some misapplications of the idea of consent, particular the role of fictitious or “proxy” consents.Where the inevitable outcome of a decision must be that a human individual will die and where that individual is a person who can consent, then that (...)
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  21.  76
    Moral enhancement and pro-social behaviour.Sarah Chan & John Harris - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (3):130-131.
    Moral enhancement is a topic that has sparked much current interest in the world of bioethics. The possibility of making people ‘better,’ not just in the conventional enhancement sense of improving health and other desirable qualities and capacities, but by making them somehow more moral, more decent, altogether better people, has attracted attention from both advocates 1 2 and sceptics 3 alike. The concept of moral enhancement, however, is fraught with difficult questions, theoretical and practical. What does it actually mean (...)
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  22. Wonderwoman and Superman: The Ethics of Human Biotechnology.John Harris - 1993 - Philosophy 68 (264):248-250.
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  23. Moral progress and moral enhancement.John Harris - 2012 - Bioethics 27 (5):285-290.
  24. Ignorance, information and autonomy.John Harris & Kirsty Keywood - 2001 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (5):415-436.
    People have a powerful interest in geneticprivacy and its associated claim to ignorance,and some equally powerful desires to beshielded from disturbing information are oftenvoiced. We argue, however, that there is nosuch thing as a right to remain in ignorance,where a right is understood as an entitlementthat trumps competing claims. This doesnot of course mean that information must alwaysbe forced upon unwilling recipients, only thatthere is no prima facie entitlement to beprotected from true or honest information aboutoneself. Any claims to be (...)
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  25. Organ procurement: dead interests, living needs.John Harris - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (3):130-134.
    Cadaver organs should be automatically availableThe shortage of donor organs and tissue for transplantation constitutes an acute emergency which demands radical rethinking of our policies and radical measures. While estimates vary and are difficult to arrive at there is no doubt that the donor organ shortage costs literally hundreds of thousands of lives every year. “In the world as a whole there are an estimated 700 000 patients on dialysis . . .. In India alone 100 000 new patients present (...)
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  26. What It’s Like to Be Good.John Harris - 2012 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (3):293-305.
    In this issue of CQ we introduce a new feature, in which noted bioethicists are invited to reflect on vital current issues. Our first invitee, John Harris, will subsequently assume editorship of this section.
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  27.  97
    Extending human lifespan and the precautionary paradox.John Harris & Søren Holm - 2002 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (3):355 – 368.
    This paper argues that a precautionary approach to scientific progress of the sort advocated by Walter Glannon with respect to life-extending therapies involves both incoherence and irresolvable paradox. This paper demonstrates the incoherence of the precautionary approach in many circumstances and argues that with respect to life-extending therapies we have at present no persuasive reasons for a moratorium on such research.
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  28. The ambiguity of the embryo: Ethical inconsistency in the human embryonic stem cell debate.Katrien Devolder & John Harris - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):153–169.
    We argue in this essay that (1) the embryo is an irredeemably ambiguous entity and its ambiguity casts serious doubt on the arguments claiming its full protection or, at least, its protection against its use as a means fo research, (2) those who claim the embryo should be protected as "one of us" are committed to a position even they do not uphold in their practices, (3) views that defend the protection of the embryo in virtue of its potentiality to (...)
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  29.  70
    Moral Blindness – The Gift of the God Machine.John Harris - 2016 - Neuroethics 9 (3):269-273.
    The continuing debate between Persson and Savulescu and myself over moral enhancement concerns two dimensions of a very large question. The large question is: what exactly makes something a moral enhancement? This large question needs a book length study and this I provide in my How to be Good, Oxford 2016.. In their latest paper Moral Bioenhancement, Freedom and Reason take my book as their point of departure and the first dimension of the big question they address is one that (...)
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  30.  73
    Taking liberties with free fall.John Harris - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (6):371-374.
    In his ‘Moral Enhancement, Freedom, and What We Value in Moral Behaviour’,1 David DeGrazia sets out to defend moral bioenhancement from a number of critics, me prominently among them. Here he sets out his stall: "Many scholars doubt what I assert: that there is nothing inherently wrong with MB. Some doubt this on the basis of a conviction that there is something inherently wrong with biomedical enhancement technologies in general. Chief among their objections are the charges that biomedical enhancement is (...)
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  31. Is Gene therapy a form of eugenics?John Harris - 1993 - Bioethics 7 (2-3):178-187.
  32.  20
    Red herrings, circuit-breakers and ageism in the COVID-19 debate.David R. Lawrence & John Harris - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (9):645-646.
    In their recent paper ‘Why lockdown of the elderly is not ageist and why levelling down equality is wrong’ Savulescu and Cameron attempt to argue the case for subjecting the ‘elderly’ to limits not imposed on other generations. We argue that selective lockdown of the elderly is unnecessary and cruel, as well as discriminatory, and that this group may suffer more than others in similar circumstances. Further, it constitutes an unjustifiable deprivation of liberty.
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  33. ‘Pass the Cocoamone, Please’: Causal Impotence, Opportunistic Vegetarianism and Act-Utilitarianism.John Richard Harris & Richard Galvin - 2012 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (3):368 - 383.
    It appears that utilitarian arguments in favor of moral vegetarianism cannot justify a complete prohibition of eating meat. This is because, in certain circumstances, forgoing meat will prevent no pain, and so, on utilitarian grounds, we should be opportunistic carnivores rather than moral vegetarians. In his paper, ‘Puppies, pigs, and people: Eating meat and marginal cases,’ Alastair Norcross argues that causal impotence arguments like these are misguided. First, he presents an analogous situation, the case of chocolate mousse a-la-bama, in order (...)
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  34.  95
    The Immoral Machine.John Harris - 2020 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 29 (1):71-79.
    :In a recent paper in Nature1 entitled The Moral Machine Experiment, Edmond Awad, et al. make a number of breathtakingly reckless assumptions, both about the decisionmaking capacities of current so-called “autonomous vehicles” and about the nature of morality and the law. Accepting their bizarre premise that the holy grail is to find out how to obtain cognizance of public morality and then program driverless vehicles accordingly, the following are the four steps to the Moral Machinists argument:1)Find out what “public morality” (...)
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  35.  18
    Violence and Responsibility.John Harris - 1980 - Philosophy 56 (216):273-274.
  36. A Debate about Moral Enhancement.John Harris & Julian Savulescu - 2015 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (1):8-22.
  37.  31
    Combatting covid-19. Or, “all persons are equal but some persons are more equal than others”?John Harris - forthcoming - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics:1-9.
    Vaccines, when available, will prove to be crucial in the fight against Covid-19. All societies will face acute dilemmas in allocating scarce lifesaving resources in the form of vaccines for Covid-19. The author proposes The Value of Lives Principle as a just and workable plan for equitable and efficient access. After describing what the principle entails, the author contrasts the advantage of this approach with other current proposals such as the Fair Priority Model.
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  38. The concept of the person and the value of life.John Harris - 1999 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 9 (4):293-308.
    : The concept of the person has come to be intimately connected with questions about the value of life. It is applied to those sorts of beings who have some special value or moral importance and where we need to prioritize the needs or claims of different sorts of individuals. "Person" is a concept designating individuals like us in some important respects, but possibly including individuals who are very unlike us in other respects. What are these respects and why are (...)
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  39.  16
    Ethical Solutions to the Problem of Organ Shortage.Aksel Braanen Sterri, Sadie Regmi & John Harris - 2022 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 31 (3):297-309.
    Organ shortage is a major survival issue for millions of people worldwide. Globally 1.2 million people die each year from kidney failure. In this paper, we critically examine and find lacking extant proposals for increasing organ supply, such as opting in and opt out for deceased donor organs, and parochial altruism and paired kidney exchange for live organs. We defend two ethical solutions to the problem of organ shortage. One is to make deceased donor organs automatically available for transplant without (...)
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  40. Stem Cells, Sex, and Procreation.John Harris - 2003 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (4):353-371.
    Sex is not the answer to everything, though young men think it is, but it may be the answer to the intractable debate over the ethics of human embryonic stem cell research. In this paper, I advance one ethical principle that, as yet, has not received the attention its platitudinous character would seem to merit. If found acceptable, this principle would permit the beneficial use of any embryonic or fetal tissue that would, by default, be lost or destroyed. More important, (...)
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  41. Popper's definitions of ‘verisimilitude’1.John H. Harris - 1974 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 25 (2):160-166.
  42.  93
    What is the harm in harmful conception? On threshold harms in non-identity cases.Nicola J. Williams & John Harris - 2014 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (5):337-351.
    Has the time come to put to bed the concept of a harm threshold when discussing the ethics of reproductive decision making and the legal limits that should be placed upon it? In this commentary, we defend the claim that there exist good moral reasons, despite the conclusions of the non-identity problem, based on the interests of those we might create, to refrain from bringing to birth individuals whose lives are often described in the philosophical literature as ‘less than worth (...)
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  43.  96
    Free riders and pious sons – why science research remains obligatory.Sarah Chan & John Harris - 2008 - Bioethics 23 (3):161-171.
    John Harris has previously proposed that there is a moral duty to participate in scientific research. This concept has recently been challenged by Iain Brassington, who asserts that the principles cited by Harris in support of the duty to research fail to establish its existence. In this paper we address these criticisms and provide new arguments for the existence of a moral obligation to research participation. This obligation, we argue, arises from two separate but related principles. The principle of fairness (...)
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  44.  88
    Taking the “Human” Out of Human Rights.John Harris - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (1):9-20.
    Human rights are universally acknowledged to be important, although they are, of course, by no means universally respected. This universality has helped to combat racism and sexism and other arbitrary and vicious forms of discrimination. Unfortunately, as we shall see, the universality of human rights is both too universal and not universal enough. It is time to take the “human” out of human rights. Indeed, it is very probable that in the future there will be no more humans as we (...)
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  45.  38
    Causal Impotence and Complicity.Richard Galvin & John R. Harris - 2023 - Public Affairs Quarterly 37 (1):47-63.
    Moral problems such as climate change and global poverty result from widespread human action, and hence, are unaffected by changes in any individual's behavior—for instance, the harms of climate change will obtain whether I drive my car or not. This problem of causal impotence seems potentially devastating for consequentialists, but more easily addressed by deontologists. The deontologist can argue that (e.g.) even if our acts will have no effect on climate change, our using fossil fuels makes us complicit in, and (...)
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  46. Wonderwoman and Superman.John Harris & Max Charlesworth - 1994 - Bioethics 8 (2):187-188.
     
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  47.  59
    Ethics and Synthetic Gametes.Giuseppe Testa & John Harris - 2005 - Bioethics 19 (2):146-166.
    The recent in vitro derivation of gamete‐like cells from mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells is a major breakthrough and lays down several challenges, both for the further scientific investigation and for the bioethical and biolegal discourse. We refer here to these cells as gamete‐like (sperm‐like or oocyte‐like, respectively), because at present there is still no evidence that these cells behave fully like bona fide sperm or oocytes, lacking the fundamental proof, i.e. combination with a normally derived gamete of the opposite (...)
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  48.  39
    Bioethics.John Harris (ed.) - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    Framed with a substantial introduction by the editor, this new book brings together the key articles written on bioethics over recent years. Subjects covered include the beginnings of life, the end of life, quality of life, value of life, future generations, and professional ethics.
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  49.  27
    The future of human reproduction : ethics, choice, and regulation.John Harris & Søren Holm (eds.) - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
    The Future of Human Reproduction brings together new work, by an international group of contributors from various fields and perspectives, on ethical, social, and legal issues raised by recent advances in reproductive technology. These advances have put us in a position to choose what kindsof children and parents there should be; the aim of the essays is to illuminate how we should deal with these possibilities for choice. Topics discussed include gender and race selection, genetic engineering, fertility treatment, ovarian tissue (...)
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  50. Williams on negative responsibility and integrity.John Harris - 1974 - Philosophical Quarterly 24 (96):265-273.
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