Results for 'Luke Arnott'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  1
    Unraveling Braid: Puzzle Games and Storytelling in the Imperative Mood.Luke Arnott - 2012 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 32 (6):433-440.
    “Unraveling Braid” analyzes how unconventional, non-linear narrative fiction can help explain the ways in which video games signify. Specifically, this essay looks at the links between the semiotic features of Jonathan Blow’s 2008 puzzle-platform video game Braid and similar elements in Georges Perec’s 1978 novel Life A User’s Manual, as well as in other puzzle-themed literary precursors. Blow’s game design concepts “dynamical meaning” and “game play rhetoric” are explained in relation to a number of Braid levels; along side this analysis (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  1
    Luke 24:1–11.Luke Timothy Johnson - 1992 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 46 (1):57-61.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  2
    Book Review: To Heal and to Reveal: The Prophetic Vocation According to Luke[REVIEW]Luke T. Johnson - 1977 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 31 (2):212-213.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  56
    Proposal for an Academic Association for Medical Humanities.R. Arnott - 2001 - Medical Humanities 27 (2):104-105.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  5. Conclusion, Carrithers, M., Collins, S. And Lukes, S.Steven Lukes - 1985 - In Michael Carrithers, Steven Collins & Steven Lukes (eds.), The Category of the Person: Anthropology, Philosophy, History. Cambridge University Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  24
    Marxism, Morality and Justice: Steven Lukes.Steven Lukes - 1982 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 14:177-205.
    A paradox, according to the OED, is ‘a statement seemingly self-contradictory or absurd, though possibly well-founded or essentially true’. In this article I shall try to show that the classical orthodox Marxist view of morality is a paradox. I shall seek to resolve the paradox by trying to show that it is only seemingly self-contradictory or absurd. But I shall not claim the standard Marxist view of morality to be well-founded or essentially true. On the contrary, I shall suggest that, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  74
    Combining Minds: How to Think About Composite Subjectivity.Luke Roelofs - 2019 - New York, USA: Oxford University Press.
    This book explores a neglected philosophical question: How do groups of interacting minds relate to singular minds? Could several of us, by organizing ourselves the right way, constitute a single conscious mind that contains our minds as parts? And could each of us have been, all along, a group of mental parts in close cooperation? Scientific progress seems to be slowly revealing that all the different physical objects around us are, at root, just a matter of the right parts put (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  8.  31
    The University of Birmingham Medical School and the History of Medicine.R. Arnott - 2002 - Medical Humanities 28 (1):33-34.
    The publication in 1993 by the General Medical Council of Tomorrow's Doctors—Recommendations on Undergraduate Medical Education provided the first real opportunity for many medical schools to advance the introduction of the history of medicine into the undergraduate medical curriculum. While the University of Birmingham Medical School, was not one of the first to introduce the subject, it has been at the forefront of the introduction of the history of medicine into the undergraduate medical curriculum since 1997, and can now boast (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9. Deterministic Chance.Luke Glynn - 2010 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 61 (1):51–80.
    I argue that there are non-trivial objective chances (that is, objective chances other than 0 and 1) even in deterministic worlds. The argument is straightforward. I observe that there are probabilistic special scientific laws even in deterministic worlds. These laws project non-trivial probabilities for the events that they concern. And these probabilities play the chance role and so should be regarded as chances as opposed, for example, to epistemic probabilities or credences. The supposition of non-trivial deterministic chances might seem to (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   65 citations  
  10.  48
    Evil: A Philosophical Investigation.Luke Russell - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    When asked to describe wartime atrocities, terrorist acts, and serial killers, many of us reach for the word 'evil'. But what does it really mean? Luke Russell defends a new account of the nature of evil action and persons. Although the concept of evil is extreme and often misused, it has a legitimate place in contemporary secular moral thought.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  11.  19
    Thrills, Chills, Frissons, and Skin Orgasms: Toward an Integrative Model of Transcendent Psychophysiological Experiences in Music.Luke Harrison & Psyche Loui - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  12. The Unity of Consciousness, Within Subjects and Between Subjects.Luke Roelofs - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (12):3199-3221.
    The unity of consciousness has so far been studied only as a relation holding among the many experiences of a single subject. I investigate whether this relation could hold between the experiences of distinct subjects, considering three major arguments against the possibility of such ‘between-subjects unity’. The first argument, based on the popular idea that unity implies subsumption by a composite experience, can be deflected by allowing for limited forms of ‘experience-sharing’, in which the same token experience belongs to more (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  13.  56
    Cognitive Culture: Theoretical and Empirical Insights Into Social Learning Strategies.Luke Rendell, Laurel Fogarty, William J. E. Hoppitt, Thomas J. H. Morgan, Mike M. Webster & Kevin N. Laland - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (2):68-76.
  14.  45
    Using Social Media as a Research Recruitment Tool: Ethical Issues and Recommendations.Luke Gelinas, Robin Pierce, Sabune Winkler, I. Glenn Cohen, Holly Fernandez Lynch & Barbara E. Bierer - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (3):3-14.
    The use of social media as a recruitment tool for research with humans is increasing, and likely to continue to grow. Despite this, to date there has been no specific regulatory guidance and there has been little in the bioethics literature to guide investigators and institutional review boards faced with navigating the ethical issues such use raises. We begin to fill this gap by first defending a nonexceptionalist methodology for assessing social media recruitment; second, examining respect for privacy and investigator (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  15. Borderline Cases and the Collapsing Principle.Luke Elson - 2014 - Utilitas 26 (1):51-60.
    John Broome has argued that value incommensurability is vagueness, by appeal to a controversial about comparative indeterminacy. I offer a new counterexample to the collapsing principle. That principle allows us to derive an outright contradiction from the claim that some object is a borderline case of some predicate. But if there are no borderline cases, then the principle is empty. The collapsing principle is either false or empty.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  16. Incommensurability as Vagueness: A Burden-Shifting Argument.Luke Elson - 2017 - Theoria 83 (4):341-363.
    Two options are ‘incommensurate’ when neither is better than the other, but they are not equally good. Typically, we will say that one option is better in some ways, and the other in others, but neither is better ‘all things considered’. It is tempting to think that incommensurability is vagueness—that it is indeterminate which is better—but this ‘vagueness view’ of incommensurability has not proven popular. I set out the vagueness view and its implications in more detail, and argue that it (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  17. Culture in Whales and Dolphins.Luke Rendell & Hal Whitehead - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):309-324.
    Studies of animal culture have not normally included a consideration of cetaceans. However, with several long-term field studies now maturing, this situation should change. Animal culture is generally studied by either investigating transmission mechanisms experimentally, or observing patterns of behavioural variation in wild populations that cannot be explained by either genetic or environmental factors. Taking this second, ethnographic, approach, there is good evidence for cultural transmission in several cetacean species. However, only the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops) has been shown experimentally to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  18. Phenomenal Blending and the Palette Problem.Luke Roelofs - 2014 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):59-70.
    I discuss the apparent discrepancy between the qualitative diversity of consciousness and the relative qualitative homogeneity of the brain's basic constituents, a discrepancy that has been raised as a problem for identity theorists by Maxwell and Lockwood (as one element of the ‘grain problem’), and more recently as a problem for panpsychists (under the heading of ‘the palette problem’). The challenge posed to panpsychists by this discrepancy is to make sense of how a relatively small ‘palette’ of basic qualities could (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  19. The Sound of Music: Externalist Style.Luke Kersten & Robert A. Wilson - 2016 - American Philosophical Quarterly 53 (2):139-154.
    Philosophical exploration of individualism and externalism in the cognitive sciences most recently has been focused on general evaluations of these two views (Adams & Aizawa 2008, Rupert 2008, Wilson 2004, Clark 2008). Here we return to broaden an earlier phase of the debate between individualists and externalists about cognition, one that considered in detail particular theories, such as those in developmental psychology (Patterson 1991) and the computational theory of vision (Burge 1986, Segal 1989). Music cognition is an area in the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  20.  54
    Fine-Tuning in the Context of Bayesian Theory Testing.Luke Barnes - 2018 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 8 (2):253-269.
    Fine-tuning in physics and cosmology is often used as evidence that a theory is incomplete. For example, the parameters of the standard model of particle physics are “unnaturally” small, which has driven much of the search for physics beyond the standard model. Of particular interest is the fine-tuning of the universe for life, which suggests that our universe’s ability to create physical life forms is improbable and in need of explanation, perhaps by a multiverse. This claim has been challenged on (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  21. Music and Cognitive Extension.Luke Kersten - 2014 - Empirical Musicology Review 9 (3-4):193-202.
    Extended cognition holds that cognitive processes sometimes leak into the world (Dawson, 2013). A recent trend among proponents of extended cognition has been to put pressure on phenomena thought to be safe havens for internalists (Sneddon, 2011; Wilson, 2010; Wilson & Lenart, 2014). This paper attempts to continue this trend by arguing that music perception is an extended phenomenon. It is claimed that because music perception involves the detection of musical invariants within an “acoustic array”, the interaction between the auditory (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  22. Rationality and Relativism.Martin Hollis & Steven Lukes (eds.) - 1982 - MIT Press.
    Are there absolute truths that can be gradually approached over time through rational processes? Or are all modes and systems of thought equally valid if viewed from within their own internally consistent frames of reference? Are there universal forms of reasoning and understanding that enable us to distinguish between rational beliefs and those that are demonstrably false, or is everything relative?These central questions are addressed and debated by the distinguished contributors to this lively book. Some of them - Hollis, Lukes, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   84 citations  
  23. Heaps and Chains: Is the Chaining Argument for Parity a Sorites?Luke Elson - 2014 - Ethics 124 (3):557-571.
    I argue that the Ruth Chang’s Chaining Argument for her parity view of value incomparability trades illicitly on the vagueness of the predicate ‘is comparable with’. Chang is alert to this danger and argues that the predicate is not vague, but this defense does not succeed. The Chaining Argument also faces a dilemma. The predicate is either vague or precise. If it is vague, then the argument is most plausibly a sorites. If it is precise, then the argument is either (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  24. A Reasonable Little Question: A Formulation of the Fine-Tuning Argument.Luke A. Barnes - 2019 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 6.
    A new formulation of the Fine-Tuning Argument (FTA) for the existence of God is offered, which avoids a number of commonly raised objections. I argue that we can and should focus on the fundamental constants and initial conditions of the universe, and show how physics itself provides the probabilities that are needed by the argument. I explain how this formulation avoids a number of common objections, specifically the possibility of deeper physical laws, the multiverse, normalisability, whether God would fine-tune at (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. Kidneys Save Lives: Markets Would Probably Help.Luke Semrau - 2014 - Public Affairs Quarterly 28 (1):71-93.
  26. Tenenbaum and Raffman on Vague Projects, the Self-Torturer, and the Sorites.Luke Elson - 2016 - Ethics 126 (2):474-488.
    Sergio Tenenbaum and Diana Raffman contend that ‘vague projects’ motivate radical revisions to orthodox, utility-maximising rational choice theory. Their argument cannot succeed if such projects merely ground instances of the paradox of the sorites, or heap. Tenenbaum and Raffman are not blind to this, and argue that Warren Quinn’s Puzzle of the Self-Torturer does not rest on the sorites. I argue that their argument both fails to generalise to most vague projects, and is ineffective in the case of the Self-Torturer (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  27. Combining Minds: A Defence of the Possibility of Experiential Combination.Luke Roelofs - 2015 - Dissertation, University of Toronto
    This thesis explores the possibility of composite consciousness: phenomenally conscious states belonging to a composite being in virtue of the consciousness of, and relations among, its parts. We have no trouble accepting that a composite being has physical properties entirely in virtue of the physical properties of, and relations among, its parts. But a long­standing intuition holds that consciousness is different: my consciousness cannot be understood as a complex of interacting component consciousnesses belonging to parts of me. I ask why: (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  28. The Distinctiveness of Polyamory.Luke Brunning - 2018 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 35 (3):513-531.
    Polyamory is a form of consensual non-monogamy. To render it palatable to critics, activists and theorists often accentuate its similarity to monogamy. I argue that this strategy conceals the distinctive character of polyamorous intimacy. A more discriminating account of polyamory helps me answer objections to the lifestyle whilst noting some of its unique pitfalls. I define polyamory, and explain why people pursue this lifestyle. Many think polyamory is an inferior form of intimacy; I describe four of their main objections. I (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  29. Probabilistic Promotion and Ability.Luke Elson - 2019 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 6.
    We often have some reason to do actions insofar as they promote outcomes or states of affairs, such as the satisfaction of a desire. But what is it to promote an outcome? I defend a new version of 'probabilism about promotion'. According to Minimal Probabilistic Promotion, we promote some outcome when we make that outcome more likely than it would have been if we had done something else. This makes promotion easy and reasons cheap.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30. Why We Need Friendly Ai.Luke Muehlhauser & Nick Bostrom - 2014 - Think 13 (36):41-47.
    Humans will not always be the most intelligent agents on Earth, the ones steering the future. What will happen to us when we no longer play that role, and how can we prepare for this transition?
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  31. Power: A Radical View.Steven Lukes & Jack H. Nagel - 1976 - Political Theory 4 (2):246-249.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   212 citations  
  32. A Probabilistic Analysis of Causation.Luke Glynn - 2011 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (2):343-392.
    The starting point in the development of probabilistic analyses of token causation has usually been the naïve intuition that, in some relevant sense, a cause raises the probability of its effect. But there are well-known examples both of non-probability-raising causation and of probability-raising non-causation. Sophisticated extant probabilistic analyses treat many such cases correctly, but only at the cost of excluding the possibilities of direct non-probability-raising causation, failures of causal transitivity, action-at-a-distance, prevention, and causation by absence and omission. I show that (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  33.  13
    The Best Argument Against Kidney Sales Fails.Luke Semrau - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (6):443-446.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  34.  96
    No Identity Without an Entity.Luke Manning - 2015 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 96 (1):279-305.
    Peter Geach's puzzle of intentional identity is to explain how the claim ‘Hob thinks a witch has blighted Bob's mare, and Nob wonders whether she killed Cob's sow’ is compatible with there being no such witch. I clarify the puzzle and reduce it to the familiar problem of negative existentials. That problem is a paradox of representations that seem to include denials of commitment , to carry commitment to what they deny commitment to, and to be true. The best proposed (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  35. Is Evil Action Qualitatively Distinct From Ordinary Wrongdoing?Luke Russell - 2007 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (4):659 – 677.
    Adam Morton, Stephen de Wijze, Hillel Steiner, and Eve Garrard have defended the view that evil action is qualitatively distinct from ordinary wrongdoing. By this, they do not that mean that evil actions feel different to ordinary wrongs, but that they have motives or effects that are not possessed to any degree by ordinary wrongs. Despite their professed intentions, Morton and de Wijze both offer accounts of evil action that fail to identify a clear qualitative difference between evil and ordinary (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  36.  63
    Asexuality.Luke Brunning & Natasha McKeever - 2021 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 38 (3):497-517.
  37. Jealousy in Relation to Envy.Luke Purshouse - 2004 - Erkenntnis 60 (2):179-205.
    The conceptions of jealousy used by philosophical writers are various, and, this paper suggests, largely inadequate. In particular, the difference between jealousy and envy has not yet been plausibly specified. This paper surveys some past analyses of this distinction and addresses problems with them, before proposing its own positive account of jealousy, developed from an idea of Leila Tov-Ruach(a.k.a. A. O. Rorty). Three conditions for being jealous are proposed and it is shownhow each of them helps to tell the emotion (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  38.  26
    Reassessing the Likely Harms to Kidney Vendors in Regulated Organ Markets.Luke Semrau - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (6):634-652.
    Julian Koplin, drawing extensively on empirical data, has argued that vendors, even in well-regulated kidney markets, are likely to be significantly harmed. I contend that his reasoning to this conclusion is dangerously mistaken. I highlight two failures. First, Koplin is insufficiently attentive to the differences between existing markets and the regulated markets proposed by advocates. On the basis of this error, he wrongly concludes that many harms will persist even in a well-regulated system. Second, Koplin misunderstands the utilitarian assessment of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  39. Moral Holism, Moral Generalism, and Moral Dispositionalism.Luke Robinson - 2006 - Mind 115 (458):331-360.
    Moral principles play important roles in diverse areas of moral thought, practice, and theory. Many who think of themselves as ‘moral generalists’ believe that moral principles can play these roles—that they are capable of doing so. Moral generalism maintains that moral principles can and do play these roles because true moral principles are statements of general moral fact (i.e. statements of facts about the moral attributes of kinds of actions, kinds of states of affairs, etc.) and because general moral facts (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  40. Of Miracles and Interventions.Luke Glynn - 2013 - Erkenntnis 78 (1):43-64.
    In Making Things Happen, James Woodward influentially combines a causal modeling analysis of actual causation with an interventionist semantics for the counterfactuals encoded in causal models. This leads to circularities, since interventions are defined in terms of both actual causation and interventionist counterfactuals. Circularity can be avoided by instead combining a causal modeling analysis with a semantics along the lines of that given by David Lewis, on which counterfactuals are to be evaluated with respect to worlds in which their antecedents (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  41.  11
    When Clinical Trials Compete: Prioritising Study Recruitment.Luke Gelinas, Holly Fernandez Lynch, Barbara E. Bierer & I. Glenn Cohen - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (12):803-809.
    It is not uncommon for multiple clinical trials at the same institution to recruit concurrently from the same patient population. When the relevant pool of patients is limited, as it often is, trials essentially compete for participants. There is evidence that such a competition is a predictor of low study accrual, with increased competition tied to increased recruitment shortfalls. But there is no consensus on what steps, if any, institutions should take to approach this issue. In this article, we argue (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  42.  78
    What's the Problem with Political Authority? A Pragmatist Account.Luke Maring - 2016 - Public Affairs Quarterly 30 (3):239-258.
    MARING, Luke – Why does the excellent citizen vote? JPP 24 (2), June 2016: 245-257. Is it morally important to vote? It is common to think so, but both consequentialist and deontological strategies for defending that intuition are weak. In response, some theorists have turned to a role-based strategy, arguing that it is morally important to be an excellent citizen, and that excellent citizens vote. But there is a lingering puzzle: an individual vote changes very little (virtually nothing in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43.  25
    The Role of Rewards in Motivating Participation in Simple Warfare.Luke Glowacki & Richard W. Wrangham - 2013 - Human Nature 24 (4):444-460.
    In the absence of explicit punitive sanctions, why do individuals voluntarily participate in intergroup warfare when doing so incurs a mortality risk? Here we consider the motivation of individuals for participating in warfare. We hypothesize that in addition to other considerations, individuals are incentivized by the possibility of rewards. We test a prediction of this “cultural rewards war-risk hypothesis” with ethnographic literature on warfare in small-scale societies. We find that a greater number of benefits from warfare is associated with a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  44. Moral Principles Are Not Moral Laws.Luke Robinson - 2007 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 2 (3):1-22.
    What are moral principles? The assumption underlying much of the generalism–particularism debate in ethics is that they are (or would be) moral laws: generalizations or some special class thereof, such as explanatory or counterfactual-supporting generalizations. I argue that this law conception of moral principles is mistaken. For moral principles do at least three things that moral laws cannot do, at least not in their own right: explain certain phenomena, provide particular kinds of support for counterfactuals, and ground moral necessities, “necessary (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  45. Marxism and Morality.Steven Lukes - 1985 - Oxford University Press.
    It is reported that the moment anyone talked to Marx about morality, he would roar with laughter. Yet, plainly, he was fired by outrage and a burning desire for a better world. This paradox is the starting point for Marxism and Morality. Discussing the positions taken by Marx, Engels, and their descendants in relation to certain moral issues, Steven Lukes addresses the questions on which Marxist thinkers and actors have taken a number of characteristic stands as well as other questions--personal (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  46.  14
    Misplaced Paternalism and Other Mistakes in the Debate Over Kidney Sales.Luke Semrau - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (3):190-198.
    Erik Malmqvist defends the prohibition on kidney sales as a justifiable measure to protect individuals from harms they have not autonomously chosen. This appeal to ‘group soft paternalism’ requires that three conditions be met. It must be shown that some vendors will be harmed, that some will be subject to undue pressure to vend, and that we cannot feasibly distinguish between the autonomous and the non-autonomous. I argue that Malmqvist fails to demonstrate that any of these conditions are likely to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  47.  69
    Extended Music Cognition.Luke Kersten - 2017 - Philosophical Psychology 30 (8):1078-1103.
    Discussions of extended cognition have increasingly engaged with the empirical and methodological practices of cognitive science and psychology. One topic that has received increased attention from those interested in the extended mind is music cognition. A number of authors have argued that music not only shapes emotional and cognitive processes, but also that it extends those processes beyond the bodily envelope. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the case for extended music cognition. Two accounts are examined in detail: (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  48.  40
    When and Why Is Research Without Consent Permissible?Luke Gelinas, Alan Wertheimer & Franklin G. Miller - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (2):35-43.
    The view that research with competent adults requires valid consent to be ethical perhaps finds its clearest expression in the Nuremberg Code, whose famous first principle asserts that “the voluntary consent of the human subject is absolutely essential.” In a similar vein, the United Nations International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights states that “no one shall be subjected without his free consent to medical or scientific experimentation.” Yet although some formulations of the consent principle allow no exceptions, others hold (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  49. A Mechanistic Account of Wide Computationalism.Luke Kersten - 2017 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 8 (3):501-517.
    The assumption that psychological states and processes are computational in character pervades much of cognitive science, what many call the computational theory of mind. In addition to occupying a central place in cognitive science, the computational theory of mind has also had a second life supporting “individualism”, the view that psychological states should be taxonomized so as to supervene only on the intrinsic, physical properties of individuals. One response to individualism has been to raise the prospect of “wide computational systems”, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50.  65
    Fundamentality and the Prior Probability of Theism.Luke Wilson - 2020 - Religious Studies 56 (2):169-180.
    Paul Draper has recently developed an account of intrinsic probability according to which a theory’s intrinsic probability is determined by its modesty and coherence. He employs this account in an argument that Source Physicalism (SP) and Source Idealism (SI) are equally intrinsically probable. Since SP and SI are not exhaustive, and Theism is one very specific version of SI, it follows that the intrinsic probability of Theism is very low. I argue here that considerations of fundamentality show that more work (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000