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John Russon [82]John Edward Russon [7]John E. Russon [1]
  1.  4
    Human Experience: Philosophy, Neurosis, and the Elements of Everyday Life.John Russon - 2003 - State University of New York Press.
    Proposes that philosophy is the proper cure for neurosis.
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  2.  5
    Bearing Witness to Epiphany: Persons, Things, and the Nature of Erotic Life.John Russon - 2009 - State University of New York Press.
    _Makes the novel argument that erotic life is the real sphere of human freedom._.
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  3.  4
    The Self and Its Body in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit.John Edward Russon - 1997 - Buffalo: University of Toronto Press.
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  4.  25
    The self as resolution: Heidegger, Derrida and the intimacy of the question of the meaning of being.John Russon - 2008 - Research in Phenomenology 38 (1):90-110.
    Because Dasein, as conceived by Heidegger, is inherently temporal, the "who" of Dasein can never be defined simply in terms of a present identity but must have the character of what Derrida calls "différance." Dasein 's authenticity, then, must be an embracing of this, its character as différance. This means that the "self" is "neither a substance nor a subject " but a resolution. The anticipatory resoluteness of authenticity, however, is a unique kind of resolve: it is the resolve to (...)
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  5.  5
    On Human Identity.John Russon - 2006 - Dialogue 45 (2):307-314.
  6.  3
    Reading Hegel's Phenomenology.John Russon - 2004 - Indiana University Press.
    An important companion to contemporary Hegel studies, this book will be of interest to all students of Hegel's philosophy.
  7.  11
    Expressing Dwelling: Dewey and Hegel on Art as Cultural Self-Articulation.John Russon - 2015 - Contemporary Pragmatism 12 (1):38-58.
    John Dewey shows the essential role of artistic expression in experience. Expression, as emotional articulation, is essential to establishing our intimate engagement with the world. G.W.F. Hegel shows that just this process of expressing our mode of “dwelling” in the world has been operative historically at the cultural level. It is characteristic of contemporary art that, in attempting to establish a new form of dwelling within the context of our technological world, it articulates just this vision of our experience as (...)
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  8.  8
    Sites of exposure: art, politics, and the nature of experience.John Russon - 2017 - Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.
    John Russon draws from a broad range of art and literature to show how philosophy speaks to the most basic and important questions in our everyday lives. In Sites of Exposure, Russon grapples with how personal experiences such as growing up and confronting death combine with broader issues such as political oppression, economic exploitation, and the destruction of the natural environment to make life meaningful. His is cutting-edge philosophical work, illuminated by original and rigorous thinking that relies on cross-cultural communication (...)
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  9.  8
    Erôs and Education : Plato's Transformative Epistemology.John Edward Russon - 2000 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 56 (1):113-125.
  10.  4
    Frontmatter.John Russon - 1997 - In John Edward Russon (ed.), The Self and Its Body in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit. Buffalo: University of Toronto Press.
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  11.  2
    Heidegger, Hegel, and Ethnicity: The Ritual Basis of Self-Identity.John Russon - 1995 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (4):509-532.
  12.  7
    Personality as equilibrium: fragility and plasticity in (inter-)personal identity.John Russon - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (4):623-635.
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  13.  11
    Phenomenology as the Critical Disclosure of the Realities within Our Experience.John Russon - 2023 - Symposium 27 (2):134-152.
    I use phenomenology to interpret the distinctive character of our human reality with a goal of determining how we can live in order to answer to our inherent needs. I distinguish three basic ways we can comport ourselves in living our lives: “security,” “preparation,” and “readiness.” I argue that readiness is the healthy ful????illment of our needs as free beings. I argue that such readiness is a continuation of the natural enthusiasm for engaging with the world manifested by children, and (...)
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  14.  10
    Emotional Subjects: Mood and Articulation in Hegel’s Philosophy of Mind.John Russon - 2009 - International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (1):41-52.
    In his discussions of “sensibility” and “feeling,” Hegel has a compelling interpretation of the emotional foundations of experience. I begin by situating “mood” within the context of “sensibility,” and then focus on the inherently “outwardizing” or self-externalizing character of mood. I then consider the different modes of moody self-externalization, for the sake of determining why we express ourselves in language. I conclude by demonstrating why the notions of emotion and spirit are necessarily linked.
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  15.  3
    The Spatiality of Self-Consciousness: Originary Passivity in Kant, Merleau-Ponty and Derrida.John Russon - 2007 - Chiasmi International 9:209-220.
  16.  6
    The Spatiality of Self-Consciousness: Originary Passivity in Kant, Merleau-Ponty and Derrida.John Russon - 2007 - Chiasmi International 9:209-220.
  17.  16
    Reading: Derrida in Hegel's understanding.John Russon - 2006 - Research in Phenomenology 36 (1):181-200.
    Hegel's dialectic "Consciousness," Part A from the Phenomenology of Spirit, is interpreted in light of the concept of "reading." The logic of reading is especially helpful for interpreting the often misunderstood dialectic of understanding, as that is described in chapter 3 of the Phenomenology, "Force and Understanding: Appearance and the Supersensible World." Hegel's concept of "the Inverted World" in particular is clarified, and from it Hegel's notion of originary difference is developed. Derrida's notion of "differance" is used to illuminate Hegel's (...)
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  18.  2
    A Note on the Text.John Russon - 1997 - In John Edward Russon (ed.), The Self and Its Body in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit. Buffalo: University of Toronto Press.
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  19. Reading and the body in Hegel.John Russon - 1993 - Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 22 (4):321-336.
     
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  20.  8
    Self-Consciousness and the Tradition in Aristotle's Psychology.John Edward Russon - 1996 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 52 (3):777-803.
  21.  8
    Selfhood, Conscience, and Dialectic in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit.John E. Russon - 1991 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 29 (4):533-550.
  22.  11
    G. W. F. Hegel: Key Concepts.Jeffery Kinlaw, Nathan Ross, John Russon, Brian O'Connor, Kevin Thompson, Brian O'connor & Alison Stone - 2015 - Acumen Publishing.
    The thought of G. W. F. Hegel has had a deep and lasting influence on a wide range of philosophical, political, religious, aesthetic, cultural and scientific movements. But, despite the far-reaching importance of Hegel's thought, there is often a great deal of confusion about what he actually said or believed. This is an invaluable introduction for philosophical beginners and a useful reference source for more advanced scholars and researchers.
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  23.  15
    Being Present.John Russon - 2022 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 43 (2):323-339.
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  24. Desiring-production and spirit: on anti-Oedipus and German idealism.John Russon - 2013 - In Karen Houle, Jim Vernon & Jean-Clet Martin (eds.), Hegel and Deleuze: Together Again for the First Time. Northwestern University Press.
  25.  2
    Presentation.Renaud Barbaras & John Russon - 2006 - Chiasmi International 8:9-10.
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  26.  5
    Presentation.Renaud Barbaras & John Russon - 2006 - Chiasmi International 8:9-10.
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  27.  2
    Presentation.Renaud Barbaras & John Russon - 2006 - Chiasmi International 8:9-10.
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  28.  4
    Presentazione.Renaud Barbaras & John Russon - 2006 - Chiasmi International 8:13-14.
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  29.  5
    Presentation.Renaud Barbaras & John Russon - 2006 - Chiasmi International 8:9-10.
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  30.  5
    Presentation.Renaud Barbaras & John Russon - 2006 - Chiasmi International 8:9-10.
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  31.  7
    Hegel and the Tradition: Essays in Honour of H.S. Harris.Michael Baur & John Russon (eds.) - 1998 - University of Toronto Press.
    Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831) is considered a philosopher of the Tradition, both in the sense that his work is rooted in the political, artistic, religious, and philosophical traditions of European culture and in the sense that he takes up the notion of tradition as an object of philosophical investigation. This collection examines Hegel's philosophy as it bears on the meaning and relevance of tradition - historical, legal, aesthetic, religious, and philosophical. The thirteen original essays draw upon and celebrate the (...)
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  32.  6
    Perception and its Development in Merleau-Ponty’s Phenomenology.Kirsten Jacobson & John Russon (eds.) - 2017 - London: University of Toronto Press.
    Perception and Its Development in Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology brings together essays from fifteen leading Merleau-Ponty scholars to demonstrate the continuing significance of Merleau-Ponty's analysis.
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  33.  3
    Acknowledgments.John Russon & Michael Baur - 1998 - In Michael Baur & John Russon (eds.), Hegel and the Tradition: Essays in Honour of H.S. Harris. University of Toronto Press.
    Acknowledgment section of the work "Hegel and the Tradition: Essays in Honour of H.S. Harris".
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  34.  4
    Acknowledgments.John Russon - 1997 - In John Edward Russon (ed.), The Self and Its Body in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit. Buffalo: University of Toronto Press.
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  35.  9
    Aristotle’s Animative Epistemology.John Russon - 1995 - Idealistic Studies 25 (3):241-253.
    I want to take up some of the most familiar texts in Aristotle, and I want to approach them in what I think is an Aristotelian fashion, but the conclusions I will reach are not, I think, the familiar ones. I will begin, in Section 1, with Aristotle’s conception of phusis—of nature—and lead from here into a discussion of the nature of life, which will lead us to the themes of soul and body. I will find the principle of desire (...)
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  36.  3
    Appendix: Hegel’s Explicit Remarks on ‘Body’.John Russon - 1997 - In John Edward Russon (ed.), The Self and Its Body in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit. Buffalo: University of Toronto Press. pp. 135-138.
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  37.  7
    Adult Life: Aging, Responsibility, and the Pursuit of Happiness.John Russon - 2020 - SUNY Press.
    What does it mean to be an adult? In this original and compelling work, John Russon answers that question by leading us through a series of rich reflections on the psychological and social dimensions of adulthood and by exploring some of the deepest ethical and existential issues that confront human life: intimacy, responsibility, aging, and death. Using his knowledge of the history of philosophy along with the combined resources of psychology, sociology, and anthropology, he explores the behavioral challenges of becoming (...)
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  38.  3
    A Study of Dialectic in Plato's Parmenides.John Russon (ed.) - 2014 - Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press.
    In this book, Eric Sanday boldly demonstrates that Plato’s “theory of forms” is true, easy to understand, and relatively intuitive. Sanday argues that our chief obstacle to understanding the theory of forms is the distorting effect of the tacit metaphysical privileging of individual things in our everyday understanding. For Plato, this privileging of things that we can own, produce, exchange, and through which we gain mastery of our surroundings is a significant obstacle to philosophical education. The dialogue’s chief philosophical work, (...)
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  39.  3
    Bibliography.John Russon - 1997 - In John Edward Russon (ed.), The Self and Its Body in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit. Buffalo: University of Toronto Press. pp. 183-196.
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  40.  3
    Contents.John Russon - 1997 - In John Edward Russon (ed.), The Self and Its Body in Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit. Buffalo: University of Toronto Press.
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  41.  2
    Contributors.John Russon & Michael Baur - 1998 - In Michael Baur & John Russon (eds.), Hegel and the Tradition: Essays in Honour of H.S. Harris. University of Toronto Press. pp. 347-349.
    Contributors section of "Hegel and the Tradition: Essays in Honour of H.S. Harris".
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  42.  2
    Contents.John Russon & Michael Baur - 1998 - In Michael Baur & John Russon (eds.), Hegel and the Tradition: Essays in Honour of H.S. Harris. University of Toronto Press.
    Contents section in "Hegel and the Tradition: Essays in Honour of H.S. Harris".
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  43.  2
    5. Conscience, Religion, and Multiculturalism: A Canadian Hegel.John Russon - 2018 - In Susan M. Dodd & Neil G. Robertson (eds.), Hegel and Canada: Unity of Opposites? London: University of Toronto Press. pp. 88-99.
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  44.  3
    1. Dialectic, difference, and the Other: the Hegelianizing of French phenomenology.John Russon - 2010 - In Alan D. Schrift (ed.), The History of Continental Philosophy. London: Routledge. pp. 1167-1192.
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  45. Dialectic, difference and th other : the Hegelianizing of French phenomenology.John Russon - 2013 - In Leonard Lawlor (ed.), Phenomenology: Responses and Developments. Durham: Routledge.
     
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  46. Derrida, Jacques.John Russon - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Hoboken, NJ: Blackwell.
     
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  47. Eros and Eris : love and strife in ancient Greek thought and culture.John Russon - 2018 - In Sean D. Kirkland & Eric Sanday (eds.), A Companion to Ancient Philosophy. Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press.
     
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  48.  6
    Emotional Subjects: Mood and Articulation in Hegel’s Philosophy of Mind.John Russon - 2009 - International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (1):41-52.
    In his discussions of “sensibility” and “feeling,” Hegel has a compelling interpretation of the emotional foundations of experience. I begin by situating “mood” within the context of “sensibility,” and then focus on the inherently “outwardizing” or self-externalizing character of mood. I then consider the different modes of moody self-externalization, for the sake of determining why we express ourselves in language. I conclude by demonstrating why the notions of emotion and spirit are necessarily linked.
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  49.  1
    Frontmatter.John Russon & Michael Baur - 1998 - In Michael Baur & John Russon (eds.), Hegel and the Tradition: Essays in Honour of H.S. Harris. University of Toronto Press.
    Frontmatter for "Hegel and the Tradition: Essays in Honour of H.S. Harris".
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  50.  6
    G. W. F. Hegel.John Russon - 2015 - In Niall Keane & Chris Lawn (eds.), A Companion to Hermeneutics. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 354–359.
    Hegel has a particularly striking and original contribution to the field of hermeneutics: a contribution long recognized, but a contribution still not sufficiently appreciated. This chapter works through a hermeneutical thesis central to Hegel's philosophy: experience is ongoingly interpretive through and through, such that the very “given” is already dependent upon interpretive acts. Hegel's philosophy clearly incorporates the central tenets of this philosophical movement in his notion that all experience is interpretive, in the “concrete” or holistic principle of his interpretive (...)
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