Results for 'Anthony L. Brueckner and John Martin Fischer'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  64
    Prenatal and Posthumous Non-Existence: A Reply to Johansson.John Martin Fischer & Anthony L. Brueckner - 2014 - The Journal of Ethics 18 (1):1-9.
    We have argued that it is rational to have asymmetric attitudes toward prenatal and posthumous non-existence insofar as this asymmetry is a special case of a more general (and arguably rational) asymmetry in our attitudes toward past and future pleasures. Here we respond to an interesting critique of our view by Jens Johansson. We contend that his critique involves a crucial and illicit switch in temporal perspectives in the process of considering modal claims (sending us to other possible worlds).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  2. Why is Death Bad?Anthony L. Brueckner & John Martin Fischer - 1986 - Philosophical Studies 50 (2):213-221.
    It seems that, whereas a person's death needn't be a bad thing for him, it can be. In some circumstances, death isn't a "bad thing" or an "evil" for a person. For instance, if a person has a terminal and very painful disease, he might rationally regard his own death as a good thing for him, or at least, he may regard it as something whose prospective occurrence shouldn't be regretted. But the attitude of a "normal" and healthy human being (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   54 citations  
  3.  52
    Actual and Counterfactual Attitudes: Reply to Brueckner and Fischer.Jens Johansson - 2014 - The Journal of Ethics 18 (1):11-18.
    In a recent article, I criticized Anthony L. Brueckner and John Martin Fischer’s influential argument—appealing to the rationality of our asymmetric attitudes towards past and future pleasures—against the Lucretian claim that death and prenatal non-existence are relevantly similar. Brueckner and Fischer have replied, however, that my critique involves an unjustified shift in temporal perspectives. In this paper, I respond to this charge and also argue that even if it were correct, it would fail (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  4.  24
    The Metaphysics of Death.John Martin Fischer (ed.) - 1993 - Stanford University Press.
    Introduction : death, metaphysics, and morality / John Martin Fischer Death knocks / Woody Allen Rationality and the fear of death / Jeffrie G. Murphy Death / Thomas Nagel The Makropulos case : reflections on the tedium of immortality / Bernard Williams The evil of death / Harry S. Silverstein How to be dead and not care : a defense of Epicurus / Stephen E. Rosenbaum The dead / Palle Yourgrau The misfortunes of the dead / George (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  5.  91
    Rationally Not Caring About Torture: A Reply to Johansson.Taylor W. Cyr - 2014 - The Journal of Ethics 18 (4):331-339.
    Death can be bad for an individual who has died, according to the “deprivation approach,” by depriving that individual of goods. One worry for this account of death’s badness is the Lucretian symmetry argument: since we do not regret having been born later than we could have been born, and since posthumous nonexistence is the mirror image of prenatal nonexistence, we should not regret dying earlier than we could have died. Anthony Brueckner and John Martin (...) have developed a response to the Lucretian challenge by arguing that it is rational to have asymmetric attitudes toward posthumous and prenatal nonexistence. Recently, Jens Johansson has criticized the Brueckner/Fischer position, claiming that it is irrelevant whether it is actually rational to care about future pleasures but not past pleasures. What matters, according to Johansson, is whether it would be rational for us to care about past pleasures had we come into existence earlier. In this paper, I add to the conversation between Johansson and Brueckner/Fischer by suggesting a way to defend the latter side’s position in a way that has not yet been suggested. I do this by considering a suggestion of Johansson’s for interpreting the Brueckner/Fischer position and by arguing that Johansson’s worry for the position I consider is actually incoherent. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  6. The Evil of Death and the Lucretian Symmetry: A Reply to Feldman.John Martin Fischer & Anthony Brueckner - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 163 (3):783-789.
    In previous work we have defended the deprivation account of death’s badness against worries stemming from the Lucretian point that prenatal and posthumous nonexistence are deprivations of the same sort. In a recent article in this journal, Fred Feldman has offered an insightful critique of our Parfitian strategy for defending the deprivation account of death’s badness. Here we adjust, clarify, and defend our strategy for reply to Lucretian worries on behalf of the deprivation account.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  7. Death's Badness.Anthony L. Brueckner & John Martin Fischer - 1993 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 74 (1):37-45.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  8.  80
    Death’s Badness and Time-Relativity: A Reply to Purves.Taylor Cyr - 2016 - The Journal of Ethics 20 (4):435-444.
    According to John Martin Fischer and Anthony Brueckner’s unique version of the deprivation approach to accounting for death’s badness, it is rational for us to have asymmetric attitudes toward prenatal and posthumous nonexistence. In previous work, I have defended this approach against a criticism raised by Jens Johansson by attempting to show that Johansson’s criticism relies on an example that is incoherent. Recently, Duncan Purves has argued that my defense reveals an incoherence not only in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9.  38
    More on the Mirror: Reply to Fischer and Brueckner.Jens Johansson - 2014 - The Journal of Ethics 18 (4):341-351.
    John Martin Fischer and Anthony L. Brueckner have argued that a person’s death is, in many cases, bad for him, whereas a person’s prenatal non-existence is not bad for him. Their suggestion relies on the idea that death deprives the person of pleasant experiences that it is rational for him to care about, whereas prenatal non-existence only deprives him of pleasant experiences that it is not rational for him to care about. In two recent articles (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  10.  48
    Accommodating Counterfactual Attitudes: A Further Reply to Johansson.John Martin Fischer & Anthony Brueckner - 2014 - The Journal of Ethics 18 (1):19-21.
    Here we respond to Johansson’s main worry, as laid out in his, “Actual and Counterfactual Attitudes: Reply to Fischer and Brueckner.” We show how our principle BF*(dd*) can be adjusted to address this concern compatibly with our fundamental approach to responding to Lucretius.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  11.  33
    The Mirror-Image Argument: An Additional Reply to Johansson.John Martin Fischer & Anthony Brueckner - 2014 - The Journal of Ethics 18 (4):325-330.
    We have argued that it is rational to have asymmetric attitudes toward prenatal and posthumous non-existence insofar as this asymmetry is a special case of a more general asymmetry in our attitudes toward past and future pleasures. Here we respond to an interesting critique of our view by Jens Johansson. We contend that his critique involves an inappropriate conflation of the time from which the relevant asymmetry emerges and the time of the badness of death.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  12.  66
    The Evil of Death: A Reply to Yi.John Martin Fischer & Anthony Brueckner - 2014 - Philosophia 42 (3):741-748.
    In previous work we have presented a reply to the Lucretian Symmetry, which has it that it is rational to have symmetric attitudes toward prenatal and posthumous nonexistence. Our reply relies on Parfit-style thought-experiments. Here we reply to a critique of our approach by Huiyuhl Yi, which appears in this journal: Brueckner and Fischer on the evil of death. We argue that this critique fails to attend to the specific nature of the thought-experiments (and our associated argument). More (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  13. Brueckner and Fischer on the Evil of Death.Huiyuhl Yi - 2012 - Philosophia 40 (2):295-303.
    A primary argument against the badness of death (known as the Symmetry Argument) appeals to an alleged symmetry between prenatal and posthumous nonexistence. The Symmetry Argument has posed a serious threat to those who hold that death is bad because it deprives us of life’s goods that would have been available had we died later. Anthony Brueckner and John Martin Fischer develop an influential strategy to cope with the Symmetry Argument. In their attempt to break (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  14. The Asymmetry of Early Death and Late Birth.Anthony Brueckner & John Martin Fischer - 1993 - Philosophical Studies 71 (3):327-331.
    In a previous paper, we argued that death's badness consists in the deprivation of pleasurable experiences which one would have had, had one died later rather than at the time of one's actual death. Thus, we argued that death can be a bad thing for the individual who dies, even if it is an experiential blank. But there is a pressing objection to this view, for if the view is correct, then it seems that it should also be the case (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  15. Brueckner and Fischer on the Evil of Death.Fred Feldman - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 162 (2):309-317.
    Abstract According to the Deprivation Approach, the evil of death is to be explained by the fact that death deprives us of the goods we would have enjoyed if we had lived longer. But the Deprivation Approach confronts a problem first discussed by Lucretius. Late birth seems to deprive us of the goods we would have enjoyed if we had been born earlier. Yet no one is troubled by late birth. So it’s hard to see why we should be troubled (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  16.  35
    Torture and Incoherence: A Reply to Cyr.Duncan Purves - 2015 - The Journal of Ethics 19 (2):213-218.
    John Martin Fischer and Anthony L. Brueckner have argued that a person’s death is, in many cases, bad for him, whereas a person’s prenatal non-existence is not bad for him. Their suggestion relies on the idea that death deprives the person of pleasant experiences that it is rational for him to care about, whereas prenatal non-existence only deprives him of pleasant experiences that it is not rational for him to care about. Jens Johansson has objected (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  17.  28
    Erratum To: The Evil of Death: A Reply to Yi.John Martin Fischer & Anthony Brueckner - 2014 - Philosophia 42 (4):1169-1169.
    Erratum to: Philosophia 42:741–748DOI 10.1007/s11406-014-9543-9The original version of this article unfortunately contained a mistake. There were two slight text errors. The correct text information are given below.In the second line of the last paragraph in section "Reply to Yi" right before the "Conclusion", the text should read as:“atypical or, as Yi suggests, are more typical than we appear to suppose”.andIn the middle of the same paragraph, the text should read as:“…Note that a proponent of the Brueckner/Fischer approach can (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  83
    Being Born Earlier.Anthony Brueckner & John Martin Fischer - 1998 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 76 (1):110 – 114.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  19. Our Stories: Essays on Life, Death, and Free Will.John Martin Fischer - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Introduction: "meaning in life and death : our stories" -- John Martin Fischer and Anthony B rueckner, "Why is death bad?", Philosophical studies, vol. 50, no. 2 (September 1986) -- "Death, badness, and the impossibility of experience," Journal of ethics -- John Martin Fischer and Daniel Speak, "Death and the psychological conception of personal identity," Midwest studies in philosophy, vol. 24 -- "Earlier birth and later death : symmetry through thick and thin," Richard (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  20. Four Views on Free Will. By John Martin Fischer, Robert Kane, Derk Pereboom, and Manuel Vargas.Anthony Dardis - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (1):147-153.
    Summary and brief critical evaluation of 4 views on free will (Kane, Fischer, Pereboom, Vargas).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  23
    Asymmetry and Incoherence: A Reply to Cyr.Jens Johansson - 2017 - The Journal of Ethics 21 (2):215-221.
    In defense of the Deprivation Approach to the badness of death against the Lucretian objection that death is relevantly similar to prenatal nonexistence, John Martin Fischer and Anthony L. Brueckner have suggested that whereas death deprives us of things that it is rational for us to care about, prenatal nonexistence does not. I have argued that this suggestion, even if correct, does not make for a successful defense of the Deprivation Approach against the Lucretian objection. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22. God, foreknowledge and freedom.John Martin Fischer - 1990 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 180 (4):728-729.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  23. Past and Future Non-Existence.Jens Johansson - 2013 - The Journal of Ethics 17 (1-2):51-64.
    According to the “deprivation approach,” a person’s death is bad for her to the extent that it deprives her of goods. This approach faces the Lucretian problem that prenatal non-existence deprives us of goods just as much as death does, but does not seem bad at all. The two most prominent responses to this challenge—one of which is provided by Frederik Kaufman (inspired by Thomas Nagel) and the other by Anthony Brueckner and John Martin Fischer—claim (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  24.  14
    The Metaphysics of Free Will: An Essay on Control. [REVIEW]Randolph Clarke & John Martin Fischer - 1997 - Philosophical Review 106 (3):450.
    The first, the Transfer Version, employs an inference principle concerning the transfer of one's powerlessness with respect to certain facts. The principle says, roughly, "If a person is powerless over one thing, and powerless over that thing's leading to another, then the person is powerless over the second thing". The key premises are the Fixity of the Past and the Fixity of the Laws. Fischer defends the transfer principle against objections that have been raised by Anthony Kenny and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  25. The Symmetry Argument Against the Deprivation Account.Huiyuhl Yi - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (3):947-959.
    Here I respond to Anthony Brueckner and John Martin Fischer’s “The Evil of Death: A Reply to Yi.” They developed an influential strategy in defense of the deprivation account of death’s badness against the Lucretian symmetry problem. The core of their argument consists in the claim that it is rational for us to welcome future intrinsic goods while being indifferent to past intrinsic goods. Previously, I argued that their approach is compatible with the evil of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  26.  93
    The Free Will Revolution.John Martin Fischer - 2006 - The Journal of Ethics 10 (3):315-345.
    I seek to reply to the thoughtful and penetrating comments by William Rowe, Alfred Mele, Carl Ginet, and Ishtiyaque Haji. In the process, I hope that my overall approach to free will and moral responsibility is thrown into clearer relief. I make some suggestions as to future directions of research in these areas.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  27. How A-Theoretic Deprivationists Should Respond to Lucretius.Natalja Deng - 2015 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 1 (3):417-432.
    What, if anything, makes death bad for the deceased themselves? Deprivationists hold that death is bad for the deceased iff it deprives them of intrinsic goods they would have enjoyed had they lived longer. This view faces the problem that birth too seems to deprive one of goods one would have enjoyed had one been born earlier, so that it too should be bad for one. There are two main approaches to the problem. In this paper, I explore the second (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  28.  71
    Functionalism and Propositions.John Martin Fischer - 1985 - Philosophical Studies 48 (November):295-311.
    Some have argued, following Stalnaker, that a plausible functionalist account of belief requires coarse-grained propositions. I have explored a class of functionalist accounts, and my argument has been that, in this class, there is no account which meetsall of the following conditions: it is plausible, noncircular, and allows for the validity of the argument to coarse-grained propositions. In producing this argument, I believe that I have shown that it might be open to a functionalist to adopt fine-grained propositions; thus, one (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  3
    Death, Immortality, and Meaning in Life: Fischer, John Martin, New York: Oxford University Press, 2019, Pp. Ix + 203, US$26.95 (Pb). [REVIEW]Anthony Hooper - 2021 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 99 (3):628-628.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Introduction to Philosophy: Classical and Contemporary Readings.John Perry, Michael Bratman & John Martin Fischer (eds.) - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Introduction to Philosophy, Fourth Edition, is the most comprehensive topically organized collection of classical and contemporary philosophy available. Building on the exceptionally successful tradition of previous editions, this edition for the first time incorporates the insights of a new coeditor, John Martin Fischer, and has been updated and revised to make it more accessible. Ideal for introductory philosophy courses, the text includes sections on the meaning of life, God and evil, knowledge and reality, the philosophy of science, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31.  66
    The Benefits and Harms of Existence and Non-Existence: Guest Editor’s Introduction.Jens Johansson - 2013 - The Journal of Ethics 17 (1-2):1-4.
    According to the “deprivation approach,” a person’s death is bad for her to the extent that it deprives her of goods. This approach faces the Lucretian problem that prenatal non-existence deprives us of goods just as much as death does, but does not seem bad at all. The two most prominent responses to this challenge—one of which is provided by Frederik Kaufman and the other by Anthony Brueckner and John Martin Fischer—claim that prenatal non-existence is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32.  24
    John Martin Fischer and Mark Ravizza: Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility. [REVIEW]Michael McKenna - 2001 - Journal of Philosophy 98 (2):93-100.
  33.  26
    Soft Facts and Harsh Realities: Reply to William Craig: John Martin Fischer.John Martin Fischer - 1991 - Religious Studies 27 (4):523-539.
    . In a number of papers I have sought to discuss and cast some doubt on a certain strategy of response to an argument that purports to show that God's foreknowledge is incompatible with human freedom. This argument proceeds from the alleged ‘fixity of the past’ to the conclusion that God's foreknowledge is incompatible with human freedom. William Lane Craig has criticized my approach to these issues. Here I should like to respond to some of Craig's claims. My goal is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  34.  50
    A Pilgrimage Through John Martin Fischer’s Deep Control: Essays on Free Will and Value.Hannah Tierney - 2016 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 10 (1):179-196.
    John Martin Fischer’s most recent collection of essays, Deep Control: Essays on Free Will and Value, is both incredibly wide-ranging and impressively detailed. Fischer manages to cover a staggering amount of ground in the free will debate, while also providing insightful and articulate analyses of many of the positions defended in the field. In this collection, Fischer focuses on the relationship between free will and moral responsibility. In the first section of his book, Fischer (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. John Martin Fischer, Ed., God, Foreknowledge, and Freedom. [REVIEW]Linda Zagzebski - 1990 - Philosophy in Review 10:309-311.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. John Martin Fischer, Ed., God, Foreknowledge, and Freedom Reviewed By.Linda Zagzebski - 1990 - Philosophy in Review 10 (8):309-311.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Responses to Bernard Berofsky, John Martin Fischer and Galen StrawsonThe Significance of Free Will.Robert Kane - 2000 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (1):157.
  38. John Martin Fischer, Robert Kane, Derk Pereboom, and Manuel Vargas, Four Views on Free Will. [REVIEW]Jason S. Miller - 2009 - Philosophical Review 118 (3):409-413.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  13
    John Martin Fischer, Our Stories: Essays on Life, Death, and Free Will: New York: Oxford University Press, 2009, 192 Pp, $65.00.Marina Oshana - 2016 - Journal of Value Inquiry 50 (3):667-672.
  40.  52
    John Martin Fischer and Mark Ravizza, Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility. [REVIEW]James Stacey Taylor - 2001 - Journal of Value Inquiry 35 (1):125-130.
  41.  14
    John Martin Fischer , Deep Control: Essays on Free Will and Value . Reviewed By.Christian Perring - 2013 - Philosophy in Review 33 (6):458-460.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. John Martin Fischer, Deep Control. Essays on Free Will and Value.Sofia Bonicalzi - 2012 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 67 (3):643.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  1
    John Martin Fischer Death, Immortality, and Meaning in Life. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019). Pp. Ix + 203. $24.95 (Pbk). ISBN 9780190921149. [REVIEW]Kevin Schilbrack - 2022 - Religious Studies 58 (1):284-287.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  74
    The ITALK Project: A Developmental Robotics Approach to the Study of Individual, Social, and Linguistic Learning.Frank Broz, Chrystopher L. Nehaniv, Tony Belpaeme, Ambra Bisio, Kerstin Dautenhahn, Luciano Fadiga, Tomassino Ferrauto, Kerstin Fischer, Frank Förster, Onofrio Gigliotta, Sascha Griffiths, Hagen Lehmann, Katrin S. Lohan, Caroline Lyon, Davide Marocco, Gianluca Massera, Giorgio Metta, Vishwanathan Mohan, Anthony Morse, Stefano Nolfi, Francesco Nori, Martin Peniak, Karola Pitsch, Katharina J. Rohlfing, Gerhard Sagerer, Yo Sato, Joe Saunders, Lars Schillingmann, Alessandra Sciutti, Vadim Tikhanoff, Britta Wrede, Arne Zeschel & Angelo Cangelosi - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3):534-544.
    This article presents results from a multidisciplinary research project on the integration and transfer of language knowledge into robots as an empirical paradigm for the study of language development in both humans and humanoid robots. Within the framework of human linguistic and cognitive development, we focus on how three central types of learning interact and co-develop: individual learning about one's own embodiment and the environment, social learning (learning from others), and learning of linguistic capability. Our primary concern is how these (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  45.  29
    John Martin Fischer . God, Foreknowledge, and Freedom. Stanford Series in Philosophy. Pp. 351. [REVIEW]William Lane Craig - 1991 - Religious Studies 27 (2):278.
  46. John Martin Fischer and Mark Ravizza, Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility Reviewed By.Arthur Ripstein - 1998 - Philosophy in Review 18 (6):416-418.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  52
    Responses to John Martin Fischer and Dana Nelkin. [REVIEW]Derk Pereboom - 2014 - Science, Religion and Culture 1 (3):218.
    I first want to thank John Fischer for his generous appraisal of the book, and for his astute and challenging comments on my treatment of the manipulation argument in Chapter 4. Fischer’s core strategy for resisting this argument is a soft-line reply. Soft-liners claim that in some manipulation cases the agent is not morally responsible, and in others he is. A corollary of the soft-line reply is that there is a plausible compatibilist condition on moral responsibility that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  48.  1
    Our Stories: Essays on Life, Death, and Free Will.John Martin Fischer - 2009 - Oxford University Press USA.
    In this collection of essays on the metaphysical issues pertaining to death, the meaning of life, and freedom of the will, John Martin Fischer argues that death can be a bad thing for the individual who dies. He defends the claim that something can be a bad thing--a misfortune--for an individual, even if he never experiences it as bad. Fischer also defends the commonsense asymmetry in our attitudes toward death and prenatal nonexistence: we are indifferent to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  49.  28
    Ethics: Problems and Principles.John Martin Fischer & Mark Ravizza - 1992 - Wadsworth Publishing Company.
    This unique text focuses on ethical puzzles and hypothetical problems to help students at all levels understand and refine their moral principles and see how they apply to various situations. An extensive, thoughtfully written introduction provides the theoretical background and lays out numerous moral puzzle cases that are analyzed and discussed throughout the text. Challenging follow-up articles argue a variety of stances on the ethical puzzles set forth in the introduction.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  50.  54
    John Martin Fischer's The Metaphysics of Free Will: An Essay on Control: Michael S. McKenna.Michael S. McKenna - 1997 - Legal Theory 3 (4):379-397.
    John Martin Fischer's The Metaphysics of Free Will is devoted to two major projects. First, Fischer defends the thesis that determinism is incompatible with a person's control over alternatives to the actual future. Second, Fischer defends the striking thesis that such control is not necessary for moral responsibility. This review essay examines Fischer's arguments for each thesis. Fischer's defense of the incompatibilist thesis is the most innovative to date, and I argue that his (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000