Results for 'patient safety'

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  1.  21
    Priming patient safety: A middle‐range theory of safety goal priming via safety culture communication.Patricia S. Groves & Jacinda L. Bunch - 2018 - Nursing Inquiry 25 (4):e12246.
    The aim of this paper is discussion of a new middle‐range theory of patient safety goal priming via safety culture communication. Bedside nurses are key to safe care, but there is little theory about how organizations can influence nursing behavior through safety culture to improve patient safety outcomes. We theorize patient safety goal priming via safety culture communication may support organizations in this endeavor. According to this theory, hospital safety culture (...)
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  2.  9
    Global patient safety: law, policy and practice.John Tingle, Clayton Ó Néill & Morgan Shimwell (eds.) - 2019 - New York, NY: Routledge.
    This book explores patient safety themes in developed, developing and transitioning countries. A foundation premise is the concept of 'reverse innovation' as mutual learning from the chapters challenges traditional assumptions about the construction and location of knowledge. This edited collection can be seen to facilitate global learning. This book will, hopefully, form a bridge for those countries seeking to enhance their patient safety policies. Contributors to this book challenge many supposed generalisations about human societies, including consideration (...)
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  3.  25
    Enhancing patient safety by integrating ethical dimensions to Critical Incident Reporting Systems.Annette Rogge, Alena Buyx, Rainer Petzina, Eva Kuhn & Kai Wehkamp - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundCritical Incident Reporting Systems (CIRS) provide a well-proven method to identify clinical risks in hospitals. All professions can report critical incidents anonymously, low-threshold, and without sanctions. Reported cases are processed to preventive measures that improve patient and staff safety. Clinical ethics consultations offer support for ethical conflicts but are dependent on the interaction with staff and management to be effective. The aim of this study was to investigate the rationale of integrating an ethical focus into CIRS.MethodsA six-step approach (...)
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  4.  13
    Patient safety ethics: how vigilance, mindfulness, compliance, and humility can make healthcare safer.John D. Banja - 2019 - Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.
    Ethical foundations of patient safety -- Vigilance -- Mindfulness -- Compliance -- Humility -- Some theoretical aspects of vigilance and risk acceptability -- Fifty shades of error -- The standard care and medical malpractice law as an ethical achievement -- The present and the future.
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  5.  16
    Regulating patient safety: the end of professional dominance?Oliver Quick - 2017 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Systematically improving patient safety is of the utmost importance, but it is also an extremely complex and challenging task. This illuminating study evaluates the role of professionalism, regulation and law in seeking to improve safety, arguing that the 'medical dominance' model is ill-suited to this aim, which instead requires a patient-centred vision of professionalism. It brings together literatures on professions, regulation and trust, while examining the different legal mechanisms for responding to patient safety events. (...)
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  6.  42
    Patient Safety and the Question of Dignitary Harms.Polly Mitchell, Alan Cribb & Vikki Entwistle - 2023 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 48 (1):33-49.
    Patient safety is a central aspect of healthcare quality, focusing on preventable, iatrogenic harm. Harm, in this context, is typically assumed to mean physical injury to patients, often caused by technical error. However, some contributions to the patient safety literature have argued that disrespectful behavior towards patients can cause harm, even when it does not lead to physical injury. This paper investigates the nature of such dignitary harms and explores whether they should be included within the (...)
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  7.  45
    Reconciling Patient Safety and Epistemic Humility: An Ethical Use of Opioid Treatment Plans.Anita Ho - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (3):34-35.
    In this issue of the Hastings Center Report, Joshua Rager and Peter Schwartz suggest using opioid treatment agreements as public health monitoring tools to inform patients about “the requirements entailed by undergoing opioid therapy,” rather than as contractual agreements to alter patients’ individual behavior or to benefit them directly. Because Rager and Schwartz's argument presents suspected OTA violations as a justification to stop providing opioids yet does not highlight the broader epistemic and systemic context within which clinicians prescribe these medications, (...)
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  8.  46
    Ethical issues in patient safety: Implications for nursing management.Mari Kangasniemi, Mojtaba Vaismoradi, Melanie Jasper & Hannele Turunen - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (8):904-916.
    The purpose of this article is to discuss the ethical issues impacting the phenomenon of patient safety and to present implications for nursing management. Previous knowledge of this perspective is fragmented. In this discussion, the main drivers are identified and formulated in ‘the ethical imperative’ of patient safety. Underlying values and principles are considered, with the aim of increasing their visibility for nurse managers’ decision-making. The contradictory nature of individual and utilitarian safety is identified as (...)
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  9.  30
    The patient safety movement.Janet L. Storch - 2005 - Nursing Ethics 12 (3):219-220.
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  10.  22
    Patient safety in primary care has many aspects: an interview study in primary care doctors and nurses.Sander Gaal, Esther Van Laarhoven, René Wolters, Raymond Wetzels, Wim Verstappen & Michel Wensing - 2010 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (3):639-643.
  11.  34
    Perioperative nurses’ experiences in relation to surgical patient safety: A qualitative study.Ester Peñataro-Pintado, Encarna Rodríguez, Jordi Castillo, María Luisa Martín-Ferreres, María Ángeles De Juan & José Luis Díaz Agea - 2021 - Nursing Inquiry 28 (2):e12390.
    Surgical patient safety remains a concern worldwide as, despite World Health Organization recommendations and implementation of its Surgical Safety Checklist, adverse events continue to occur. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the views and experiences of perioperative nurses regarding the factors that impact surgical patient safety. Data were collected through five focus groups involving a total of 50 perioperative nurses recruited from four public hospitals in Spain. Content analysis of the focus groups (...)
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  12.  12
    Surgical residents' perceptions of patient safety climate in Dutch teaching hospitals.Kartinie Martowirono, Cordula Wagner & A. Bart Bijnen - 2014 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (2):121-128.
  13.  40
    Effect of patient safety strategies on the incidence of adverse events.M. Amelia Fernandez Sierra, M. Del Mar Rodriguez del Aguila, Jose Luis Navarro Espigares & M. Francisca Enriquez Maroto - 2014 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (2):184-190.
  14.  13
    The epistemology of patient safety research.W. B. Runciman, G. Ross Baker, P. Michel, I. L. Jauregui, R. J. Lilford, A. Andermann, R. Flin & W. B. Weeks - 2008 - International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare 6 (4).
    Patient safety has only recently been subjected to wide-spread systematic study. Healthcare differs from other high risk industries in being more diverse and multi-contextual, and less certain and regulated. Also many patient safety problems are low-frequency events associated with many, varied contributing factors. The subject of this paper is the epistemology of patient safety (the science of the method of finding out about patient safety). Patient safety research is considered here (...)
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  15.  89
    Error and patient safety: Ethical analysis of cases in occupational and physical therapy practice. [REVIEW]Linda S. Scheirton, K. Mu, H. Lohman & T. M. Cochran - 2007 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (3):301-311.
    Compared to other health care professions such as medicine, nursing and pharmacy, few studies have been conducted to examine the nature of practice errors in occupational and physical therapy. In an ongoing study to determine root causes, typographies and impact of occupational and physical therapy error on patients, focus group interviews have been conducted across the United States. A substantial number of harmful practice errors and/or other patient safety events (deviations or accidents) have been identified. Often these events (...)
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  16.  23
    Effects of an educational patient safety campaign on patients' safety behaviours and adverse events.David L. B. Schwappach, Olga Frank, Ute Buschmann & Reto Babst - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (2):285-291.
  17.  33
    Supporting Second Victims of Patient Safety Events: Shouldn't These Communications Be Covered by Legal Privilege?Mélanie E. de Wit, Clifford M. Marks, Jeffrey P. Natterman & Albert W. Wu - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):852-858.
    Adverse events that harm patients can also have a harmful impact on health care workers. A few health care organizations have begun to provide psychological support to these Second Victims, but there is uncertainty over whether these discussions are admissible as evidence in malpractice litigation or disciplinary proceedings. We examined the laws governing the admissibility of these communications in 5 states, and address how the laws might affect participation in programs designed to support health care workers involved in adverse events. (...)
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  18.  10
    Navigating Informed Consent and Patient Safety in Surgery: Lessons for Medical Students and Junior Trainees.Eric Kodish, Michael S. O’Connor, Alejandro Bribriesco & August A. Culbert - 2023 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 34 (3):278-281.
    In the operating room, patient safety is of paramount importance. Medical students and junior trainees, despite their primary role as students, may play active roles in assessing patient safety and reporting suspected errors. Active consent is one layer of patient safety that is continuously assessed by several team members. This article examines an instance where patient consent may have been violated. Through the lens of trainee and senior perspectives, we discuss the ethical principles (...)
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  19.  11
    Research handbook on patient safety and the law.John Tingle, Caterina Milo, Gladys Msiska & Ross Millar (eds.) - 2023 - Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing.
    Despite recurring efforts, a gap exists across a variety of contexts between the protection of patients' safety in theory and in practice. This timely Research Handbook highlights these critical issues and suggests both legal and policy changes are necessary to better protect patients' safety. Multidisciplinary in nature, this Research Handbook features contributions from eminent academics, policy makers and medical practitioners from the Global North and South, discussing the essential facets concerning patient safety and the law. It (...)
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  20.  14
    Special Supplement: Promoting Patient Safety: An Ethical Basis for Policy Deliberation.Virginia A. Sharpe - 2003 - Hastings Center Report 33 (5):S1.
  21.  34
    Patient safety and quality in healthcare.E. J. Arries - 2014 - Nursing Ethics 21 (1):3-5.
  22.  27
    Error Reduction, Patient Safety and Institutional Ethics Committees.Mark E. Meaney - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (2):358-364.
    Institutional ethics committees remain largely absent from the literature on error reduction and patient safety. This paper attempts to fill the gap. Healthcare professionals are on the front lines in the defense against medical error, but the changes that are needed to reduce medical errors and enhance patient safety are cultural and systemic in nature. As noted in the Hastings Centers recent report, Promoting Patient Safety, the occurrence of medical error involves a complex web (...)
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  23.  26
    Reviewing methodologically disparate data: a practical guide for the patient safety research field.Katrina F. Brown, Susannah J. Long, Thanos Athanasiou, Charles A. Vincent, J. Simon Kroll & Nick Sevdalis - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (1):172-181.
  24.  32
    Supporting Second Victims of Patient Safety Events: Shouldn't These Communications Be Covered by Legal Privilege?Mélanie E. de Wit, Clifford M. Marks, Jeffrey P. Natterman & Albert W. Wu - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):852-858.
    The harmful impact of an adverse event ripples beyond injured patients and their families to affect physicians, nurses, and other health care staff that are involved. These “Second Victims” may experience intense feelings of anxiety, guilt, and fear. They may doubt their clinical competence or ability to continue working at all. Some go on to suffer post-traumatic stress disorder and depression.Medical institutions long ignored this problem, preferring to believe that adverse events, or “errors,” occur due to incompetence — the unfortunate (...)
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  25.  37
    Designing evidence‐based patient safety interventions: the case of the UK's National Health Service hospital wristbands.Nick Sevdalis, Beverley Norris, Chris Ranger & Sue Bothwell - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (2):316-322.
  26.  11
    Conflict, confusion and inconsistencies: Pre‐registration nursing students’ perceptions and experiences of speaking up for patient safety.Anthea Fagan, Jackie Lea & Vicki Parker - 2021 - Nursing Inquiry 28 (1):e12381.
    There is growing evidence demonstrating that nursing students encounter unsafe and poor clinical practice when on clinical placement. The impact on nursing students remains relatively under‐explored, especially in the Australian context. This two‐phased qualitative study used Interpretive Description to explore 53 pre‐registration nursing students’ perceptions and experiences of speaking up for patient safety. Results of the study identified students believe speaking up is the right thing to do, and their professional responsibility. The study results add to previous research (...)
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  27.  21
    Integrating Ethics and Patient Safety: The Role of Clinical Ethics in Quality Improvment (vol 20, pg 220, 2009).Douglas J. Opel, Dena Brownstein, Douglas S. Diekema, Benjamin S. Wilfond & Robert A. Pearlman - 2009 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 20 (4):370-370.
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  28.  19
    Outcome-Based Regulatory Strategies for Promoting Greater Patient Safety.Stephen D. Sugarman - 2014 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 15 (2):573-604.
    The patient safety movement seeks to reduce the number of avoidable injuries and diseases that patients suffer while in hospital. Two regulatory strategies in support of that movement are explored here. “Required disclosure” would rely on market responses to an increase in publicly available information about hospital errors. “Performancebased regulation” would require hospitals to reduce their error rate or suffer substantial financial penalties. Both approaches are designed to give medical service providers incentives to promote safety without resorting (...)
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  29.  28
    Error Reduction, Patient Safety and Institutional Ethics Committees.Mark E. Meaney - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (2):358-364.
    Institutional ethics committees remain largely absent from the literature on error reduction and patient safety. This paper attempts to fill the gap. Healthcare professionals are on the front lines in the defense against medical error, but the changes that are needed to reduce medical errors and enhance patient safety are cultural and systemic in nature. As noted in the Hastings Centers recent report, Promoting Patient Safety, the occurrence of medical error involves a complex web (...)
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  30.  13
    Integrating Ethics and Patient Safety: The Role of Clinical Ethics Consultants in Quality Improvement.Robert A. Pearlman, Benjamin S. Wilfond, Douglas S. Diekema, Dena Brownstein & Douglas J. Opel - 2009 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 20 (3):221-227.
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  31.  31
    Hospital Finances and Patient Safety Outcomes.William E. Encinosa & Didem M. Bernard - 2005 - Inquiry: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing 42 (1):60-72.
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  32.  31
    Patients' and health care professionals' attitudes towards the PINK patient safety video.Rachel E. Davis, Anna Pinto, Nick Sevdalis, Charles Vincent, Rachel Massey & Ara Darzi - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (4):848-853.
  33.  20
    When to err is inhuman: An examination of the influence of artificial intelligence‐driven nursing care on patient safety.Elizabeth A. Johnson, Katherine M. Dudding & Jane M. Carrington - 2024 - Nursing Inquiry 31 (1):e12583.
    Artificial intelligence, as a nonhuman entity, is increasingly used to inform, direct, or supplant nursing care and clinical decision‐making. The boundaries between human‐ and nonhuman‐driven nursing care are blurred with the advent of sensors, wearables, camera devices, and humanoid robots at such an accelerated pace that the critical evaluation of its influence on patient safety has not been fully assessed. Since the pivotal release of To Err is Human, patient safety is being challenged by the dynamic (...)
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  34.  41
    Closing the safety loop: evaluation of the National Patient Safety Agency's guidance regarding wristband identification of hospital inpatients.Nick Sevdalis, Beverley Norris, Chris Ranger & Sue Bothwell - 2009 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (2):311-315.
  35.  21
    Perioperative Ethics and Patient Safety.Jana Wichsova & Andrea Horakova - 2018 - Postmodern Openings 9 (4):184-196.
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  36.  17
    Electronic Medical Records : Patient Safety and Ethical Considerations.Monique Frize - 2012 - Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine 3 (1-3):3-8.
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  37.  18
    Are health professionals' perceptions of patient safety related to figures on safety incidents?Lucie Martijn, Mirjam Harmsen, Sander Gaal, Dirk Mettes, Simone Dulmen & Michel Wensing - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (5):944-947.
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  38.  46
    Learning from litigation. The role of claims analysis in patient safety.Charles Vincent, Caroline Davy, Aneez Esmail, Graham Neale, Max Elstein, Jenny Firth Cozens & Kieran Walshe - 2006 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 12 (6):665-674.
  39.  13
    Psychological Intervention to Improve Communication and Patient Safety in Obstetrics: Examination of the Health Action Process Approach.Christina Derksen, Lukas Kötting, Franziska Maria Keller, Martina Schmiedhofer & Sonia Lippke - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    BackgroundHuman failure and a lack of effective communication are the main reasons for preventable adverse events, compromising patient safety in obstetrics. In order to improve safety, team and communication interventions have been implemented but lack feasibility in obstetric care. Psychological models such as the health action process approach might help to improve interventions.MethodsIn a cross-sectional online survey with N = 129 healthcare workers and a paper-pencil survey with N = 137 obstetric healthcare workers at two obstetric university (...)
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  40.  22
    Paths to Reducing Medical Injury: Professional Liability and Discipline vs. Patient Safety — And the Need for a Third Way.Randall R. Bovbjerg, Robert H. Miller & David W. Shapiro - 2001 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 29 (3-4):369-380.
    Too many patients are injured in the course of care. Clinicians may mistakenly cause new harm to a patient or fail to take established steps to improve the presenting condition. Medical institutions within which they work may lack mechanisms to reduce errors or prevent them from harming patients. Many, perhaps even most, injuries are preventable, probably numbering in the hundreds of thousands a year for hospital care alone. Long ignored by medical practitioners and health-care payers and little appreciated by (...)
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  41.  16
    The Culture of Patient Safety.Lewis W. Mustard - 2002 - Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 4 (4):111-115.
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  42.  39
    Theory of protective empowering for balancing patient safety and choices.Rosalina F. Chiovitti - 2011 - Nursing Ethics 18 (1):88-101.
    Registered nurses in psychiatric-mental health nursing continuously balance the ethical principles of duty to do good (beneficence) and no harm (non-maleficence) with the duty to respect patient choices (autonomy). However, the problem of nurses’ level of control versus patients’ choices remains a challenge. The aim of this article is to discuss how nurses accomplish their simultaneous responsibility for balancing patient safety (beneficence and non-maleficence) with patient choices (autonomy) through the theory of protective empowering. This is done (...)
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  43.  23
    Paths to Reducing Medical Injury: Professional Liability and Discipline vs. Patient Safety ? and the Need for a Third Way.Randall R. Bovbjerg, Robert H. Miller & David W. Shapiro - 2001 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 29 (3-4):369-380.
    Too many patients are injured in the course of care. Clinicians may mistakenly cause new harm to a patient or fail to take established steps to improve the presenting condition. Medical institutions within which they work may lack mechanisms to reduce errors or prevent them from harming patients. Many, perhaps even most, injuries are preventable, probably numbering in the hundreds of thousands a year for hospital care alone. Long ignored by medical practitioners and health-care payers and little appreciated by (...)
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  44.  7
    The relationship between the perception of open disclosure of patient safety incidents, perception of patient safety culture, and ethical awareness in nurses.Yujeong Kim & Eunmi Lee - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-9.
    Background Scientific advances have resulted in more complex medical systems, which in turn have led to an increase in the number of patient safety incidents. In this environment, the importance of honest disclosure of PSIs is rising, which highlight the need to settle a reliable system. This study aimed to investigate the effects of patient safety culture and ethical awareness on open disclosure of PSIs. Methods Data were collected from 389 nurses using self-reported perceptions of open (...)
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  45.  37
    "My Place in the Sun": Reflections on the Thought of Emmanuel Levinas.Committee of Public Safety - 1996 - Diacritics 26 (1):3-10.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Martin Heidegger and OntologyEmmanuel Levinas (bio)The prestige of Martin Heidegger 1 and the influence of his thought on German philosophy marks both a new phase and one of the high points of the phenomenological movement. Caught unawares, the traditional establishment is obliged to clarify its position on this new teaching which casts a spell over youth and which, overstepping the bounds of permissibility, is already in vogue. For once, (...)
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  46.  28
    Collaboration of Ethics and Patient Safety Programs: Opportunities to Promote Quality Care.William A. Nelson, Julia Neily, Peter Mills & William B. Weeks - 2008 - HEC Forum 20 (1):15-27.
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  47.  34
    The disparity of frontline clinical staff and managers' perceptions of a quality and patient safety initiative.Anam Parand, Susan Burnett, Jonathan Benn, Anna Pinto, Sandra Iskander & Charles Vincent - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (6):1184-1190.
  48.  53
    Therapy, Enhancement, and Medicine: Challenges for the Doctor–Patient Relationship and Patient Safety.James J. Delaney & David Martin - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (4):831-844.
    There are ethical guidelines that form the foundation of the traditional doctor–patient relationship in medicine. Health care providers are under special obligations to their patients. These include obligations to disclose information, to propose alternative treatments that allow patients to make decisions based on their own values, and to have special concern for patients’ best interests. Furthermore, patients know that these obligations exist and so come to their physicians with a significant level of trust. In this sense, therapeutic medicine significantly (...)
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  49.  43
    Using an interactive voice response system to improve patient safety following hospital discharge.Alan J. Forster & Carl van Walraven - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (3):346-351.
  50.  23
    Integrating cognitive ethnography and phenomenology: rethinking the study of patient safety in healthcare organisations.Malte Lebahn-Hadidi, Lotte Abildgren, Lise Hounsgaard & Sune Vork Steffensen - 2021 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 22 (1):193-215.
    While the past decade has witnessed a proliferation of work in the intersection between phenomenology and empirical studies of cognition, the multitude of possible methodological connections between the two remains largely uncharted. In line with recent developments in enactivist ethnography, this article contributes to the methodological multitude by proposing an integration between phenomenological interviews and cognitive video ethnography. Starting from Schütz’s notion of the _taken-for-granted_ (_das Fraglos-gegeben_), the article investigates a complex work environment through phenomenological interviews and Cognitive Event Analysis, (...)
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