Results for 'environmental justice'

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  1.  21
    Environmental Justice.Robert Figueroa & Claudia Mills - 1991 - In Dale Jamieson (ed.), A Companion to Environmental Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 426–438.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Two dimensions of environmental justice Domestic environmental justice in the United States Global environmental justice Conclusions.
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  2.  18
    On environmental justice, Part I: an intuitive conservation dilemma.Joseph Mazor - 2023 - Economics and Philosophy 39 (2):230-255.
    This article introduces an intuitive conservation dilemma called the Canyon Dilemma: Is it possible to condemn the mining of the Grand Canyon, even by a poor generation, while also permitting this generation’s mining of an unremarkable small canyon? It then argues that not one of several prominent theories of environmental justice, including various forms of egalitarianism, welfarism, deep-ecological theories, communitarianism and free-market environmentalism, can navigate this dilemma. The article concludes by highlighting the dilemma-navigating potential of the equal-claims idea (...)
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  3.  16
    On environmental justice, Part II: non-absolute equal division of rights to the natural world.Joseph Mazor - 2023 - Economics and Philosophy 39 (2):256-284.
    This article considers whether any interpretation of the idea of equal claims to the natural world can resolve the Canyon Dilemma (i.e. can justify protecting the Grand Canyon but not a small canyon from mining by a poor generation). It first considers and ultimately rejects the idea of subjecting natural resource rights to an intergenerational equal division. It then demonstrates that a pluralist theory of environmental justice committed to both respect for the separateness of persons and to the (...)
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  4. Global Environmental Justice.Robert C. Robinson - 2018 - Choice 55 (8).
    The term “environmental justice” carries with it a sort of ambiguity. On the one hand, it refers to a movement of social activism in which those involved fight and argue for fairer, more equitable distribution of environmental goods and equal treatment of environmental duties. This movement is related to, and ideally informed by, the second use of the term, which refers to the academic discipline associated with legal regulations and theories of justice and ethics with (...)
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  5.  31
    Environmental Justice: More Hard Work yet to Be Done.David B. Resnik - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics 24 (3):18-20.
    The environmental justice movement began in 1982, when residents of Shocco Township, a low-income, African-American community located in Warren County, North Carolina, protested the state’s plan to...
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  6.  25
    Environmental Justice: Creating Equality, Reclaiming Democracy.Kristin Sharon Shrader-Frechette - 2002 - New York, US: Oup Usa.
    A leading international expert on environmental issues, Shrader-Frechette brings a new standard of rigor to philosophical discussions of environmental justice in her latest work. Observing that environmental activists often value environmental concerns over basic human rights, she points out the importance of recognising that minority groups and the poor in general are frequently the biggest victims of environmental degradation, a phenomenon with serious social and political implications that the environmental movement has failed to (...)
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  7.  27
    Global Environmental Justice and Bioethics: Overcoming Beneficence and Individual Responsibility.Komi Kadja & David Rodríguez-Arias - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics 24 (3):55-57.
    Ray and Cooper (2024) argue for the need to incorporate the fight for environmental justice into the bioethics agenda. While they convincingly argue that the principle of justice involves environme...
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  8.  28
    Environmental Justice: A Missing Core Tenet of Global Health.Redeat Workneh, Merhawit Abadi, Krystle Perez, Sharla Rent, Elliott Mark Weiss, Stephanie Kukora, Olivia Brandon, Gal Barbut, Sahar Rahiem, Shaphil Wallie, Joseph Mhango, Benjamin C. Shayo, Friday Saidi, Gesit Metaferia, Mahlet Abayneh & Gregory C. Valentine - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics 24 (3):20-23.
    Reducing health disparities and improving health outcomes are fundamental principles in global health. Environmental justice remains underrecognized and undervalued as a key driver of health dispar...
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  9.  20
    Environmental justice and climate change policies.David B. Resnik - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (7):735-741.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 7, Page 735-741, September 2022.
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  10.  16
    Environmental justice and care: critical emancipatory contributions to sustainability discourse.Leonie Bellina & Daniela Gottschlich - 2017 - Agriculture and Human Values 34 (4):941-953.
    Sustainability has become a powerful discourse, guiding the efforts of various stakeholders to find strategies for dealing with current and future social-ecological crises. To overcome the latter, we argue that sustainability discourse needs to be based on a critical-emancipatory conceptualization. Therefore, we engage two such approaches—environmental justice approaches informed by a plural understanding of justice and feminist political economy ones focusing on care—and their analytical potential for productive critique of normative assumptions in the dominant sustainability discourse. Both (...)
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  11. Environmental justice in interdisciplinary perspective.Ivo Wallimann-Helmer, Basil Bornemann, Pius Krütli & Dominic Roser - 2021 - GAIA - Ecological Perspectives for Science and Society 30 (2):126-128.
    Empirical research on environmental justice often simplifies normative implica tions, and ethical investigations in these fields often lack real-world complexity. A new working group bridges these gaps.
     
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  12.  10
    Reparative Environmental Justice in a World of Wounds.Ben Almassi - 2020 - Lexington Books.
    Reparative Environmental Justice in a World of Wounds examines how we can repair human and biotic relationships damaged by environmental injustice, climate change, animal exploitation, and ecological destruction by arguing for the merits of a reparative approach to environmental justice and critically assessing challenges that come with it.
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  13.  9
    John Rawls and environmental justice: implementing a sustainable and socially just future.John Töns - 2022 - New York, NY: Routledge.
    Using the principles of John Rawls' theory of justice, this book offers an alternative political vision; one which describes a mode of governance that will enable communities to implement a sustainable and socially just future. Rawls described a theory of justice that not only describes the sort of society in which anyone would like to live but that any society can create a society based on just institutions. While philosophers have demonstrated that Rawls's theory can provide a framework (...)
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  14.  30
    Environmental Justice for Whom?Sean A. Valles - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics 24 (3):24-26.
    Ray and Cooper (2024) make a very compelling argument for vastly increasing bioethicists’ engagement with environmental justice. I strongly support this proposal and agree with their arguments. Yet...
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  15.  12
    Environmental justice in the American south: an analysis of black women farmworkers in Apopka, Florida.Anne Saville & Alison E. Adams - 2020 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (1):193-204.
    Research has established that the burdens of externalities associated with industrial production are disproportionately borne by socially and politically vulnerable groups, and this is particularly true for farmworkers who are at high risk for environmental exposures and illnesses. The impacts of these risks are often compounded by farmworker communities’ social vulnerability. Yet, less is known about how the intersection of race, class, and gender can position some farmworkers to be at higher risk for particular types of oppressions. We extend (...)
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  16.  7
    Environmental justice without environmental racism.J. R. Sterba - 2001 - Global Bioethics 14 (1):21-31.
    In this paper, I propose to defend an account of environmental justice that is not only acceptable both from an anthropocentric or human-centric perspective and from a non-anthropocentric or biocentric perspective, but also deals squarely with the problem of environmental racism.
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  17.  5
    Environmental Justice and Rawlsian Social Contract Theory.Stanislav Myšička - 2015 - Filosofie Dnes 7 (1):39-60.
    Contemporary social and political theory is not wholly sufficient for dealing with environmental issues unless it will be more informed by political theories of justice. I present the view that environmental justice can be fruitfully approached from the point of view of contemporary social contract theory, mainly the one inspired by the work of John Rawls. Healthy natural environment is indispensable for many reasons for every human society; however, nature possesses also value going beyond pure instrumentality (...)
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  18.  5
    Background environmental justice: An extension of Rawls's political liberalism.Edward Abplanalp - unknown
    This dissertation extends John Rawls’s mature theory of justice out to address the environmental challenges that citizens of liberal democracies now face. Specifically, using Rawls’s framework of political liberalism, I piece together a theory of procedural justice to be applied to a constitutional democracy. I show how citizens of pluralistic democracies should apply this theory to environmental matters in a four stage contracting procedure. I argue that, if implemented, this extension to Rawls’s theory would secure background (...)
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  19.  16
    Environmental Justice, Values, and Scientific Expertise.Daniel Steel & Kyle Powys Whyte - 2012 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 22 (2):163-182.
    This essay compares two philosophical proposals concerning the relation between values and science, both of which reject the value-free ideal but nevertheless place restrictions on how values and science should interact. The first of these proposals relies on a distinction between the direct and indirect roles of values, while the second emphasizes instead a distinction between epistemic and nonepistemic values. We consider these two proposals in connection with a case study of disputed research on the topic of environmental (...) and argue that the second proposal has several advantages over the first. (shrink)
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  20.  3
    Critical environmental justice and the nature of the firm.Ian Carrillo & David Pellow - 2021 - Agriculture and Human Values 38 (3):815-826.
    The critical environmental justice (CEJ) framework contends that inequalities are sustained through intersecting social categories, multi-scalarity, the perceived expendability of marginalized populations, and state-vested power. While this approach offers new pathways for environmental justice research, it overlooks the role of firms, suggesting a departure from long-standing political-economic theories, such as the treadmill of production (ToP), which elevate the importance of producers. In focusing on firms, we ask: how do firms operationalize diverse social forces to produce (...) injustice? What organizational logics sustain these inequalities? To understand the firm-level dynamics shaping treadmill acceleration and environmental injustice, we utilize two concepts—social embeddedness and managerial authority—from economic sociology research on firms. The former refers to the social and non-economic factors that guide economic decision-making, whereas the latter refers to the power that reinforces worksite hierarchies. This theoretical paper argues that social embeddedness and managerial authority interact within firms to produce an organizational logic that sustains environmental injustice and ecological disorganization. We draw from historical and contemporary evidence on sugarcane plantations in Latin America and the Caribbean, with cases ranging from the colonial period to the present day. By bringing economic sociological concepts to bear on the CEJ and ToP frameworks, we advance debates on how firm-level dynamics shape environmental inequalities. (shrink)
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  21.  19
    Environmental Justice, Unknowability and Unqualified Affectability.Kristie Dotson & Kyle Whyte - 2013 - Ethics and the Environment 18 (2):55-79.
    Environmental justice seeks fairness in how environmental burdens and risks are visited on poor people, women, communities of color, Indigenous peoples, minorities, and citizens of developing countries. It also concerns whether members of these same groups have fair access to environmental goods such as urban green spaces, forested areas, and clean water. Environmental goods extend, also, to opportunities to benefit from enterprises such as tourism and green infrastructure (Shrader-Frechette 2002; Bullard 2000; Taylor 2000; Whyte 2010). (...)
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  22.  25
    Defining Environmental Justice: Theories, Movements, and Nature.David Schlosberg - 2007 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The basic task of this book is to explore what, exactly, is meant by 'justice' in definitions of environmental and ecological justice. It examines how the term is used in both self-described environmental justice movements and in theories of environmental and ecological justice. The central argument is that a theory and practice of environmental justice necessarily includes distributive conceptions of justice, but must also embrace notions of justice based in (...)
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  23.  13
    Defining Environmental Justice: Theories, Movements, and Nature: Theories, Movements, and Nature.David Schlosberg - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    The book uses both environmental movements and political theory to help define what is meant by environmental and ecological justice. It will be attractive to anyone interested in environmental politics, environmental movements, and justice theory.
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  24.  25
    Environmental Justice in and of Healthcare.Caroline Burkholder & Nora L. Jones - 2024 - American Journal of Bioethics 24 (3):47-50.
    Ray and Cooper (2024) present a clear and compelling argument for giving greater prioritization to environmental injustice in the work we do as bioethicists. Their discussion of justice and vulnera...
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  25. The Value of Environmental Justice.Bill E. Lawson - 2008 - Environmental Justice 1 (3):155-158.
    Environmental justice, at least, entails preserving the environment as a global entity, but also making those persons who feel, have felt, have been, or are victims of environmental crimes and atrocities feel as if theyare part of the solution as full members of the human community and not just the environmental dump-ing ground for the well-off.
     
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  26.  6
    Cohousing, Environmental Justice, and Urban Sustainability.Shane Epting - 2018 - Environmental Ethics 40 (2):135-151.
    Several researchers hold that the cohousing movement supports sustainability, but it remains economically restrictive. This condition challenges cohousing’s status as sustainable, considering that its financially exclusive nature fails to meaningfully address sustainability’s social dimension. Yet, it is doubtful that the cohousing movement set out to create this outcome. When we examine the historical conditions that pertain to multifamily housing, we discover a long-standing pattern of discrimination. For today’s cohousing communities, we see that they are dealing with the residual effects of (...)
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  27.  3
    Environmental Justice as Social Work Practice Environmental Justice as Social Work Practice, Christina L. Erickson, New York, OxfordUniversity Press, 2018, 200 pp, €33.93(paperback), ISBN: 978-0-19087-105-5. [REVIEW]Joe Whelan - 2024 - Ethics and Social Welfare 18 (2):223-224.
    Environmental Justice as Social Work Practice is written to be a main textbook in a specialised course on social work and the environment. First published in 2018, the importance of a textbook cove...
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  28. Environmental Justice.Peter S. Wenz - 1989 - Ethics 100 (1):197-198.
     
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  29.  6
    Social costs of environmental justice associated with the practice of green marketing.Philemon Oyewole - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 29 (3):239-251.
    This paper presents a conceptual link among green marketing, environmental justice, and industrial ecology. It argues for greater awareness of environmental justice in the practice of green marketing. In contrast with the type of costs commonly discussed in the literature, the paper identified another type of costs, termed "costs with positive results," that may be associated with the presence of environmental justice in green marketing. A research agenda is finally suggested to determine consumers'' awareness (...)
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  30.  9
    Environmental Justice.Karen J. Warren - 1999 - Environmental Ethics 21 (2):151-161.
    I argue that the framing of environmental justice issues in terms of distribution is problematic. Using insights about the connections between institutions of human oppression and the domination of the natural environment, as well as insights into nondistributive justice, I argue for a nondistributive model to supplement, complement, and in some cases preempt the distributive model. I conclude with a discussion of eight features of such a nondistributive conception of justice.
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  31.  2
    Postmodernism, Environmental Justice, and the Demise of the Ecology Movement?George Sessions - 1995 - The Trumpeter 12 (4).
  32.  24
    No Environmental Justice Movement in France? Controversy about Pollution in Two Southern French Industrial Towns.Christelle Gramaglia - 2014 - Analyse & Kritik 36 (2):287-314.
    This paper describes the emergence of a controversy concerning pollution and environmental and health risks in two southern French towns, Viviez and Salindres, which are both known for their long industrial history. It explores some of the reasons why the majority of the local populations resented the fact that the; issues raised were addressed publicly. It also examines some of the coping strategies residents may have developed to avoid talking about risks and to distance themselves from them. It goes (...)
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  33.  60
    Environmental Justice: A Proposal for Addressing Diversity in Bioprospecting”.Pamela J. Lomelino - 2006 - International Journal of Diversity in Organizations, Communities and Nations 6.
    Recently, there has been an insurgence of corporations that bioprospect in Third World countries (going into these areas in hopes of utilizing traditional knowledge about local natural resources so as to eventually develop a synthetic alternative that they can then market). Although this type of bioprospecting does not encounter the problem of depleting environmental resources, other problems arise. Two primary problems are: (1) determining who has legal ownership of these resources, and (2) who should share in the profits that (...)
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  34.  9
    Environmental Justice as a Foundation for a Process-based Framework for Adaptation and Mitigation: A Commentary on Brooks.Clement Loo - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):145-149.
    Brooks convincingly makes the case that the current arguments for climate mitigation and adaptation fail. Each of the arguments discussed by Brooks appeals to end-state solutions that are some combination of poorly defined, inadequate, inappropriate, or are impossible. Thus, those arguments provide us with relatively limited guidance regarding what we should do about climate change. I hope to extend Brooks’ article by providing a rough sketch of how we might think about responding to climate change that does not depend upon (...)
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  35.  7
    Environmental justice: An environmental civil rights value acceptable to all world views.Troy W. Hartley - 1995 - Environmental Ethics 17 (3):277-289.
    In accordance with environmental injustice, sometimes called environmental racism, minority communities are disproportionately subjected to a higher level of environmental risk than other segments of society. Growing concern over unequal environmental risk and mounting evidence of both racial and economic injustices have led to a grass-roots civil rights campaign called the environmental justice movement. The environmental ethics aspects of environmental injustice challenge narrow utilitarian views and promote Kantian rights and obligations. Nevertheless, an (...)
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  36. May Artificial Intelligence take health and sustainability on a honeymoon? Towards green technologies for multidimensional health and environmental justice.Cristian Moyano-Fernández, Jon Rueda, Janet Delgado & Txetxu Ausín - 2024 - Global Bioethics 35 (1).
    The application of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in healthcare and epidemiology undoubtedly has many benefits for the population. However, due to its environmental impact, the use of AI can produce social inequalities and long-term environmental damages that may not be thoroughly contemplated. In this paper, we propose to consider the impacts of AI applications in medical care from the One Health paradigm and long-term global health. From health and environmental justice, rather than settling for a short and (...)
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  37.  9
    Global Environmental Justice and Postcolonial Critique.Joshua Mousie - 2012 - Environmental Philosophy 9 (2):21-45.
    In this article I examine contemporary accounts of global justice theory (which I designate as domestic and institutional) and how they are implemented in order to formulate notions of global environmental justice. I underscore how these accounts are limited in their ability to provide thick conceptions of environmental justice, mainly because they fail to provide promising alternative visions of global politics that can substantially combat the injustices and inequalities that are currently so popular in neoliberal (...)
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  38. Environmental justice.Ryan Holifield - 2015 - In Thomas Albert Perreault, Gavin Bridge & James McCarthy (eds.), The Routledge handbook of political ecology. New York, NY: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
  39.  29
    Environmental Justice and Rawls’ Difference Principle.Derek Bell - 2004 - Environmental Ethics 26 (3):287-306.
    It is widely acknowledged that low-income and minority communities in liberal democratic societies suffer a disproportionate burden of environmental hazards. Is “environmental injustice” a necessary feature of liberal societies or is its prevalence due to the failure of existing liberal democracies to live up to liberal principles of justice? One leading version of liberalism, John Rawls’ “justice as fairness,” can be “extended” to accommodate the concerns expressed by advocates of environmental justice. Moreover, Rawlsian (...) justice has some significant advantages over existing conceptions of environmental justice. (shrink)
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  40. Environmental Virtues and Environmental Justice.Paul Haught - 2011 - Environmental Ethics 33 (4):357-375.
    Environmental virtue ethics (EVE) can be applied to environmental justice. Environmental justice refers to the concern that many poor and nonwhite communities bear a disproportionate burden of risk of exposure to environmental hazards compared to white and/or economically higher-class communities. The most common applied ethical response to this concern—that is, to environmental injustice—is the call for an expanded application of human rights, such as requirements for clean air and water. The virtue-oriented approach can (...)
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  41.  30
    Intercultural Philosophy and Environmental Justice between Generations: Indigenous, African, Asian, and Western Perspectives.Hiroshi Abe, Matthias Fritsch & Mario Wenning (eds.) - 2024 - New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
    The primary objective of this anthology is to make intergenerational justice an issue for intercultural philosophy, and, conversely, to allow the latter to enrich the former. In times of large-scale environmental destabilization, fair- ness between generations is an urgent issue of justice across time, but it is also a global issue of justice across geographical and nation-state borders. This means that the future generations envisioned by the currently living also cross these borders. Thus, different philosophical cultures (...)
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  42.  39
    Mining Thacker Pass: Environmental Justice and the Demands of Green Energy.Manuel Rodeiro - 2023 - Environmental Justice 16 (2):91-95.
    This paper considers the environmental justice issues presented by the proposed open-pit lithium mine in Thacker Pass, Nevada (Peehee mm’huh). Unlike the environmental destruction wrought from fossil fuel extraction, lithium is used to create lithium-ion batteries for storing and using electricity from “green energy” sources. Can the potential reduction in carbon emissions resulting from the lithium mined morally and politically justify the destruction of the Pass’s sagebrush sea – a critical wildlife habitat and sacred land to the (...)
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  43.  10
    Social costs of environmental justice associated with the practice of green marketing.Janet S. Adams, Armen Tashchian & Ted H. Shore - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 29 (3):199-211.
    This study investigated effects of codes of ethics on perceptions of ethical behavior. Respondents from companies with codes of ethics (n = 465) rated role set members (top management, supervisors, peers, subordinates, self) as more ethical and felt more encouraged and supported for ethical behavior than respondents from companies without codes (n = 301). Key aspects of the organizational climate, such as supportiveness for ethical behavior, freedom to act ethically, and satisfaction with the outcome of ethical problems were impacted by (...)
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  44.  4
    Environmental Justice as Environmental Ethics: A New Introduction.Robert M. Figueroa - 2016 - Routledge.
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  45.  58
    Reconciliation and environmental justice.Deborah McGregor - 2018 - Journal of Global Ethics 14 (2):222-231.
    ABSTRACTThe conclusion of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission launched a new chapter in Indigenous-state relationships in Canada. Despite many resulting ‘reconciliation initiatives’, there remains considerable discussion as to what form reconciliation should take and for what end. Reconciliation processes must involve Indigenous peoples from the outset and should be founded on Indigenous intellectual and legal traditions. Indigenous peoples’ conceptions of reconciliation differ markedly from state-sponsored views, particularly the view that reconciliation must be achieved among all beings of Creation, including all (...)
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  46.  23
    Climate Change and Environmental Justice.Clement Loo - 2023 - In Pellegrino Gianfranco & Marcello Di Paola (eds.), Handbook of Philosophy of Climate Change. Springer Nature. pp. 601-622.
    This chapter provides a broad overview of the relationship between climate change and environmental justice. It provides (1) a brief review of the concept of environmental justice, (2) discussion about how environmental justice applies to climate change, and (3) several examples of how environmental justice has been integrated into climate governance.
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  47.  19
    Exploitation: A Missing Element to Our Understanding of Environmental Justice.Christopher H. Pearson - 2023 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 26 (3):374-386.
    Environmental justice crucially depends on issues of distributive justice. However, absent from philosophical examinations of environmental justice has been careful consideration of the role exploitation should occupy in our moral evaluations of some cases the initially present as instances of environmental injustice. This paper seeks to both motivate the importance of understanding the significance exploitation has in select cases of environmental justice, as well as provide a conceptual framework for how to assess (...)
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  48.  5
    Negotiating Eternity: Energy Policy, Environmental Justice, and the Politics of Nuclear Waste.Steven M. Hoffman - 2001 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 21 (6):456-472.
    Arguing that a crisis is upon us, the Bush Administration has proposed an energy strategy remarkable in its scope and audacity. While much criticism has been directed towards the plan’s ecological impacts, it also guarantees the continuing collapse of communities tha stand in the way of the full realization of the current energy economy. This situation is best understood reference to evolving notions of environmental justice. Unfortunately, the variety of meanings attributable to environmental justice often times (...)
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  49.  3
    Environmental Justice as Counterpublic Theology: Reflections for a Postpandemic Public.Andrew R. H. Thompson - 2020 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 41 (2-3):114-132.
    On the eve of the 2016 election, which ushered in the Trump era, an article by Alan Jacobs in Harper's Magazine lamented the decline of the Christian public intellectual and noted the need for such figures today—what Jacobs describes as the "'Where Is Our Reinhold Niebuhr?' Problem." Jacobs has in mind the Christian social and political thinkers of the early and mid-twentieth century, such as Niebuhr, T. S. Eliot, C. S. Lewis, "and their fellow travelers," who were willing to challenge (...)
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  50.  10
    Environmental Justice.Karen J. Warren - 1999 - Environmental Ethics 21 (2):151-161.
    I argue that the framing of environmental justice issues in terms of distribution is problematic. Using insights about the connections between institutions of human oppression and the domination of the natural environment, as well as insights into nondistributive justice, I argue for a nondistributive model to supplement, complement, and in some cases preempt the distributive model. I conclude with a discussion of eight features of such a nondistributive conception of justice.
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