Results for 'nanotechnology'

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  1. Nanotechnology as Ideology: Towards a Critical Theory of ‘Converging Technologies’.Axel Gelfert - 2011 - Science, Technology and Society 17 (1):143-164.
    The present paper contributes to a growing body of philosophical, sociological, and historical analyses of recent nanoscale science and technology. Through a close examination of the origins of contemporary nanotech efforts, their ambitions, and strategic uses, it also aims to provide the basis for a critical theory of emerging technologies more generally, in particular in relation to their alleged convergence in terms of goals and outcomes. The emergence, allure, and implications of nanotechnology, it is argued, can only be fully (...)
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  2. Nanotechnologically Enhanced Combat Systems: The Downside of Invulnerability.Robert Mark Simpson & Robert Sparrow - 2014 - In Bert Gordijn & Anthony Mark Cutter (eds.), In Pursuit of Nanoethics. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer. pp. 89-103.
    In this paper we examine the ethical implications of emerging Nanotechnologically Enhanced Combat Systems (or 'NECS'). Through a combination of materials innovation and biotechnology, NECS are aimed at making combatants much less vulnerable to munitions that pose a lethal threat to soldiers protected by conventional armor. We argue that increasing technological disparities between forces armed with NECS and those without will exacerbate the ethical problems of asymmetric warfare. This will place pressure on the just war principles of jus in bello, (...)
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  3. Nanotechnology, enhancement, and human nature.Nicole Hassoun - 2008 - NanoEthics 2 (3):289-304.
    Is nanotechnology-based human enhancement morally permissible? One reason to question such enhancement stems from a concern for preserving our species. It is harder than one might think, however, to explain what could be wrong with altering our own species. One possibility is to turn to the environmental ethics literature. Perhaps some of the arguments for preserving other species can be applied against nanotechnology-based human enhancements that alter human nature. This paper critically examines the case for using two of (...)
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  4. Nanotechnology and Nature: On Two Criteria for Understanding Their Relationship.Gregor Schiemann - 2005 - Hyle 11 (1):77 - 96.
    Two criteria are proposed for characterizing the diverse and not yet perspicuous relations between nanotechnology and nature. They assume a concept of nature as that which is not made by human action. One of the criteria endorses a distinction between natural and artificial objects in nanotechnology; the other allows for a discussion of the potential nanotechnological modification of nature. Insofar as current trends may be taken as indicative of future development, nanotechnology might increasingly use the model of (...)
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  5.  55
    On nanotechnology and ambivalence: The politics of enthusiasm. [REVIEW]Matthew Kearnes & Brian Wynne - 2007 - NanoEthics 1 (2):131-142.
    The promise of scientific and technological innovation – particularly in fields such as nanotechnology – is increasingly set against what has been articulated as a deficit in public trust in both the new technologies and regulatory mechanisms. Whilst the development of new technology is cast as providing contributions to both quality of life and national competitiveness, what has been termed a ‘legitimacy crisis’ is seen as threatening the vitality of this process. However in contrast to the risk debates that (...)
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  6. Nanotechnology.Alfred Nordmann - 2012 - In Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, Stig Andur Pedersen & Vincent F. Hendricks (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Technology. Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  7.  48
    Nanotechnology, development and buddhist values.Soraj Hongladarom - 2009 - NanoEthics 3 (2):97-107.
    Nanotechnology has been proclaimed as a new technology that could bridge the gap between the rich and the poor countries. Indeed many countries in Asia are fast developing their nanotechnological capabilities. However, one needs to take into consideration the role that culture and values play in adoption of nanotechnological policies, keeping in mind that technology and culture are deeply dependent on each other. I offer a criticism of the dependency theory in economic development, which says that there is an (...)
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  8.  2
    Nanotechnology and Public Interest Dialogue: Some International Observations.Graeme A. Hodge & Diana M. Bowman - 2007 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 27 (2):118-132.
    This article examines nanotechnology within the context of the public interest. It notes that though nanotechnology research and development investment totalled US$9.6 billion in 2005, the public presently understands neither the implications nor how it might be best governed. The article maps a range of nanotechnology dialogue activities under way within the United Kingdom, the United States, Germany, and Australia. It explores the various approaches to articulating public interest matters and notes a shift in the way in (...)
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  9.  41
    Nanotechnology, contingency and finitude.Christopher Groves - 2009 - NanoEthics 3 (1):1-16.
    It is argued that the social significance of nanotechnologies should be understood in terms of the politics and ethics of uncertainty. This means that the uncertainties surrounding the present and future development of nanotechnologies should not be interpreted, first and foremost, in terms of concepts of risk. It is argued that risk, as a way of managing uncertain futures, has a particular historical genealogy, and as such implies a specific politics and ethics. It is proposed, instead, that the concepts of (...)
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  10.  54
    Nanotechnology bound: Evaluating the case for more regulation. [REVIEW]Patrick Lin - 2007 - NanoEthics 1 (2):105-122.
    In continuing news, there is a growing debate on whether current laws and regulations, both in the US and abroad, need to be strengthened as they relate to nanotechnology. On one side, experts argue that nanomaterials, which are making their way into the marketplace today, are possibly harmful to consumers and the environment, so stronger and new laws are needed to ensure they are safe. On the other side, different experts argue that more regulation will slow down the pace (...)
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  11.  11
    Nanotechnology and the Negotiation of Novelty.Arne Hessenbruch - 2004 - In Baird D. (ed.), Discovering the Nanoscale. Ios. pp. 135--44.
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  12.  58
    Nanotechnology — a new field of ethical inquiry?Armin Grunwald - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (2):187-201.
    Parallel to the public discussion on the benefits and risks of nanotechnology, a debate on the ethics of nanotechnology has begun. It has been postulated that a new “nano-ethics” is necessary. In this debate, the — positive as well as negative — visionary and speculative innovations which are brought into connection with nanotechnology stand in the foreground. In this contribution, an attempt is made to discover new ethical aspects of nanotechnology in a more systematic manner than (...)
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  13.  11
    Nanotechnology Policy and Education.Regan Stinnett - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):551-552.
    Nanotechnology has been a focal area of United States (US) Science and Technology policy since President Clinton's administration. The Unites States is investing more funds in nanotechnology research and development than any other nation. The US National Laboratory community and Sandia National Laboratories in particular is responding to their country's interest by generating exceptional Nano-based science and technology and focusing these efforts on national security and safety concerns. The United States and others are finding that the technological, safety, (...)
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  14.  39
    Nanotechnology – steps towards understanding human beings as technology?Armin Grunwald & Yannick Julliard - 2007 - NanoEthics 1 (2):77-87.
    Far-reaching promises made by nanotechnology have raised the question of whether we are on the way to understanding human beings more and more as belonging to the realm of technology. In this paper, an increasing need to understand the technological re-conceptualization of human beings is diagnosed whenever increasingly “technical” interpretations of humans as mechanical entities are disseminated. And this can be observed at present in the framework of nanobiotechnology, a foremost “technical” self-description where a technical language is adopted. The (...)
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  15.  20
    Narrative, Nanotechnology and the Accomplishment of Public Responses: a Response to Thorstensen.Matthew Kearnes, Phil Macnaghten & Sarah R. Davies - 2014 - NanoEthics 8 (3):241-250.
    In this paper, we respond to a critique by Erik Thorstensen of the ‘Deepening Ethical Engagement and Participation in Emerging Nanotechnologies’ project concerning its ‘realist’ treatment of narrative, its restricted analytical framework and resources, its apparent confusion in focus and its unjustified contextualisation and overextension of its findings. We show that these criticisms are based on fairly serious misunderstandings of the DEEPEN project, its interdisciplinary approachand its conceptual context. Having responded to Thorstensen’s criticisms, we take the opportunity to clarify and (...)
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  16.  21
    Nanotechnology and Ethics: The Role of Regulation Versus Self-Commitment in Shaping Researchers' Behavior. [REVIEW]Matthias Fink, Rainer Harms & Isabella Hatak - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):569-581.
    The governance of nanotechnology seeks to limit its risks, without constraining opportunities. The literature on the effectiveness of approaches to governance has neglected approaches that impact directly on the behavior of a researcher. We analyze the effectiveness of legal regulations versus regulation via self-commitment. Then, we refine this model by analyzing competition and autonomy as key contingency factors. In the first step, qualitative interviews with nanotechnology researchers are conducted to reflect this model. In the second step, its empirical (...)
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  17.  25
    Nanotechnology, Governance, and Public Deliberation: What Role for the Social Sciences?Phil Macnaghten, , Matthew B. Kearnes & Brian Wynne - 2005 - Science Communication 27 (2):268-291.
    In this article we argue that nanotechnology represents an extraordinary opportunity to build in a robust role for the social sciences in a technology that remains at an early, and hence undetermined, stage of development. We examine policy dynamics in both the United States and United Kingdom aimed at both opening up, and closing down, the role of the social sciences in nanotechnologies. We then set out a prospective agenda for the social sciences and its potential in the future (...)
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  18. Nanotechnology and human enhancement: A symposium.Fritz Allhoff & Patrick Lin - 2008 - Nanoethics: The Ethics of Technologies That Converge at the Nanoscale 2:251-327.
    Human enhancement, in which nanotechnology is expected to play a major role, continues to be a highly contentious ethical debate, with experts on both sides calling it the single most important issue facing science and society in this brave, new century. This paper is a broad introduction to the symposium herein that explores a range of perspectives related to that debate. We will discuss what human enhancement is and its apparent contrast to therapy; and we will begin to tease (...)
     
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  19.  26
    Introduction: Nanotechnology, Society, and Ethics.Patrick Lin & Fritz Allhoff - 2008 - In Fritz Allhoff (ed.), Nanotechnology & Society: Current and Emerging Ethical Issues. Dordrecht: Springer.
    This introduction provides background information on the emerging field of nanotechnology and its ethical dimensions. After defining nanotechnology and briefly discussing its status as a discipline, about which there exists a meta-controversy, this introduction turns to a discussion of the status of nanoethics and lays out particular issues of concern in the field, both current and emerging.
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  20.  25
    Nanotechnology, Sensors, and Rights to Privacy.Alan Rubel - 2010 - Public Affairs Quarterly 24 (2):131-153.
    A suite of technological advances based on nanotechnology has received substantial attention for its potential to affect privacy. Reports of the National Nanotechnology Initiative have recognized that the societal implications of nanotechnology will include better surveillance and information-gathering technologies. A variety of academic and popular publications have explained the potential effects of nanotechnology on privacy.The ways in which nanotechnology might affect privacy are varied. It may make current information technology better, make old information-gathering techniques more (...)
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  21.  6
    Nanotechnology: The Challenge of Regulating Known Unknowns.Robin Fretwell Wilson - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (4):704-713.
    Nanotechnology is a subject about which we know less than we should, but probably more than we think we do at first glance. Like Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld's “known unknowns,” we have learned enough to know what we should be concerned with. Glimmers of risk cropped up recently when German authorities recalled a bathroom cleansing product, “MagicNano,” that purported to contain nanosized particles and was on the market for only three days. More than one hundred people suffered severe respiratory (...)
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  22.  53
    Nanotechnology: a new regime for the public in science?Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent - 2012 - Scientiae Studia 10 (SPE):85-94.
    "Public engagement in science" is one of the buzzwords that, since 2000, has been used in nanotechnology programs. To what extent does public engagement disrupt the traditional relations between science and the public? This paper briefly contrasts the traditional model of science communication - the diffusionist model - that prevailed in the twentieth century and the new model - the participatory model - that tends to prevail nowadays. Then it will try to disentangle the assumptions underlying the public dialogue (...)
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  23. The Social Life of Nanotechnology.Barbara Herr Harthorn & John Mohr (eds.) - 2012 - Routledge.
    This book addresses the interconnections and tensions between technological development, the social benefits and risks of new technology, and the changing political economy of a global world system as they apply to the emerging field of nanotechnologies. The basic premise, developed throughout the volume, is that nanotechnologies have an undertheorized and often invisible social life that begins with their constructed origins and propels them around the globe, across multiple localities, institutions and collaborations, through diverse industries, research labs, and government agencies (...)
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  24. Biotechnology, nanotechnology, media, and public opinion.Susanna Priest - 2008 - In Kenneth H. David & Paul B. Thompson (eds.), What Can Nanotechnology Learn From Biotechnology?: Social and Ethical Lessons for Nanoscience From the Debate Over Agrifood Biotechnology and Gmos. Elsevier/Academic Press.
     
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  25.  42
    Can nanotechnology be just? On nanotechnology and the emerging movement for global justice.Andrew Jamison - 2009 - NanoEthics 3 (2):129-136.
    Because of the overly market-oriented way in which technological development is carried out, there is a great amount of hubris in regard to how scientific and technological achievements are used in society. There is a tendency to exaggerate the potential commercial benefits and willfully neglect the social, cultural, and environmental consequences of most, if not all innovations, especially in new fields such as nanotechnology. At the same time, there are very few opportunities, or sites, for ensuring that nanotechnology (...)
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  26.  61
    Is Nanotechnology Giving Rise to New Ethical Problems?Fabio Bacchini - 2013 - NanoEthics 7 (2):107-119.
    In this paper I focus on the question of whether nanotechnology is giving rise to new ethical problems rather than merely to new instances of old ethical problems. Firstly, I demonstrate how important it is to make a general distinction between new ethical problems and new instances of old problems. Secondly, I propose one possible way of interpreting the distinction and offer a definition of a “new ethical problem”. Thirdly, I examine whether there is good reason to claim that (...)
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  27.  70
    Nanotechnology: Considering the complex ethical, legal, and societal issues with the parameters of human performance. [REVIEW]Linda MacDonald Glenn & Jeanann S. Boyce - 2008 - NanoEthics 2 (3):265-275.
    Nanotechnology: Considering the Complex Ethical, Legal, and Societal Issues with the Parameters of Human Performance Content Type Journal Article Pages 265-275 DOI 10.1007/s11569-008-0047-6 Authors Linda MacDonald Glenn, Albany Medical College/Center Alden March Bioethics Institute Albany NY 12208 USA Jeanann S. Boyce, Montgomery College Dept. of Computer Science and Business 7600 Takoma Avenue Takoma Park MD 20912 USA Journal NanoEthics Online ISSN 1871-4765 Print ISSN 1871-4757 Journal Volume Volume 2 Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 3.
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  28.  1
    Nanotechnology: From “Wow” to “Yuck”?Kristen Kulinowski - 2004 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 24 (1):13-20.
    Nanotechnology is science and engineering resulting from the manipulation of matter’s most basic building blocks: atoms and molecules. As such, nanotechnology promises unprecedented control over both the materials we use and the means of their production. Such control could revolutionize nearly every sector of our economy, including medicine, defense, and energy. Despite the relatively recent emergence of this field, it already enjoys generous federal funding and enthusiastic media coverage. The tenor of discourse on nanotechnology is changing, however, (...)
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  29.  31
    Nanotechnology: Societal Implications—Individual Perspectives.William Sims Bainbridge - unknown
    Managing the Nanotechnology Revolution: Consider the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Criteria.................................................................................. 24..
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  30. Nanotechnology: From Feynman to Funding.K. Eric Drexler - 2004 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 24 (1):21-27.
    The revolutionary Feynman vision of a powerful and general nanotechnology, based on nanomachines that build with atom-by-atom control, promises great opportunities and, if abused, great dangers. This vision made nanotechnology a buzzword and launched the global nanotechnology race. Along the way, however, the meaning of the word has shifted. A vastly broadened definition of nanotechnology enabled specialists from diverse fields to infuse unrelated research with the Feynman mystique. The resulting nanoscaletechnology funding coalition has obscured the Feynman (...)
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  31.  24
    Nanotechnology & Society: Current and Emerging Ethical Issues.Fritz Allhoff (ed.) - 2008 - Springer.
    The essays tackle such contentious issues as environmental impact, health dangers, medical benefits, intellectual property, professional code of ethics, privacy ...
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  32.  33
    What Can Nanotechnology Learn From Biotechnology?: Social and Ethical Lessons for Nanoscience From the Debate Over Agrifood Biotechnology and Gmos.Kenneth H. David & Paul B. Thompson (eds.) - 2008 - Elsevier/Academic Press.
    Printbegrænsninger: Der kan printes kapitelvis.
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  33.  24
    Nanotechnology Policies in Latin America: Risksto Health and Environment. [REVIEW]Guillermo Foladori - 2013 - NanoEthics 7 (2):135-147.
    The presence of nanotechnologies grew and spread throughout Latin America during the first decade of the 21st century. Science and Technology policies have played an important role in the performance of these new technologies. Various international institutions, such as the World Bank, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, and the Organization of American States promoted similar Science and Technology policies, and included nanotechnology as a priority area. This article shows the role of these Science and Technology policies in (...)
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  34.  38
    Nanotechnologies and Novel Foods in European Law.Daniela Marrani - 2013 - NanoEthics 7 (3):177-188.
    Food is a big business in the EU and nanofood products are beginning to be placed on the market. It is still unclear whether the absence of minimum regulation at a global level promotes or prevents the growth of a market in nanofood. However, the development of an adequate risk management policy in relation to food safety is a key concern for consumers. Importantly, the European Parliament in its 2009 Resolution on “Legal aspects on nanomaterials” called for more in-depth scientific (...)
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  35. Nanotechnology-Benefits and Risks.Michael Herbert - 2005 - Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 11 (1):1.
     
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  36.  16
    Nanotechnologies, food, and agriculture: next big thing or flash in the pan? [REVIEW]Lawrence Busch - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):215-218.
    The advent of the new nanotechnologies has been heralded by government, media, and many in the scientific community as the next big thing. Within the agricultural sector research is underway on a wide variety of products ranging from distributed intelligence in orchards, to radio frequency identification devices, to animal diagnostics, to nanofiltered food products. But the nano-revolution (if indeed there is a revolution at all) appears to be taking a turn quite different from the biotechnology revolution of two decades ago. (...)
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  37.  19
    Governing Nanotechnology in a Multi-Stakeholder World.Ineke Malsch - 2013 - NanoEthics 7 (2):161-172.
    This article contributes to the debate on governance of emerging technologies, focusing in particular on the international level and taking into account the fact that these technologies are developed through a common effort of different stakeholders including governments, research communities, industry and civil society actors. These issues are explored from the perspective of communitarian ethical criticism of liberal social contract thinking, in order to enhance visibility of the influence collective non-state actors exercise on the development of these technologies. In particular, (...)
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  38. Nanotechnology : assessment and convergence inside the technoscience.Tomasz Stepien - 2014 - In Ewa Bińczyk & Tomasz Stepien (eds.), Modeling technoscience and nanotechnology assessment: perspectives and dilemmas. Peter Lang.
     
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  39.  5
    Nanotechnology: The Challenge of Regulating Known Unknowns.Robin Fretwell Wilson - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (4):704-713.
    Media reports of the health hazards posed by nano-sized particles have turned a white hot spotlight on the risks of nanotechnology. Worried about the risks posed to workers producing nano-materials, the Washington Post has labeled nanotechnology a “seat-of-the-pants occupational health experiment.” This article examines our emerging knowledge base about the hazards of two types of exposure: inhalation of NSPs and topical application of products containing NSPs. It argues that a clear-eyed evaluation of the benefits and risks of (...) is made extremely difficult by the marriage of a complex science with a venture capitalist-like hype. It then suggests that, absent additional statutory authority, governmental regulators cannot readily address the risks posed by these products. This regulatory inaction leaves a significant role for the private insurance market, a role that regulators should support in tangible ways outlined in the article. (shrink)
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  40.  30
    Nanotechnology and Privacy: The Instructive Case of RFID.Jeroen van den Hoven - 2006 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (2):215-228.
    The development of ever smaller integrated circuits at the sub-micron and nanoscale—in accordance with Moore’s Law—drives the production of very small tags, smart cards, smart labels and sensors. Nanoelectronics and submicron technology supports surveillance technology which is practically invisible. I argue that one of the most urgent and immediate concerns associated with nanotechnology is privacy. Computing in the twenty-first century will not only be pervasive and ubiquitous, but also inconspicuous. If these features are not counteracted in design, they will (...)
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  41. Nanotechnology and its Governance.Arie Rip - 2019 - Routledge.
    This book charts the development of nanotechnology in relation to society from the early years of the twenty-first century. It offers a sustained analysis of the life of nanotechnology, from the laboratory to society, from scientific promises to societal governance, and attempts to modulate developments.
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  42. Understanding Public Debate on Nanotechnologies.Rene von Schomberg (ed.) - 2010 - Publications Office of the European Union.
    This book features the contribution of major European research projects on the governance and ethics of Nanotechnology. They focus on the responsible development of nanotechnology and on the understanding of public debate.
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  43.  27
    Nanotechnology, uncertainty and regulation. A guest editorial.Simone Arnaldi & Alessia Muratorio - 2013 - NanoEthics 7 (3):173-175.
    Nanotechnology has been established as a priority research and policy focus, cutting across several R&D fields from pharmaceutics, food and electronics. The raise of nanotechnologies has been accompanied by an enduring uncertainty characterising the developments of the scientific knowledge related to this field, as well as the social trajectories of technological applications. Such a condition inevitably affects regulatory responses to such technologies, their development and their uses. This special issue addresses this junction between uncertainty and regulation. With no ambition (...)
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  44. Nanotechnology: Regulation and Public Discourse.Iris Eisenberger, Angela Kallhoff & Claudia Schwarz-Plaschg (eds.) - 2019 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    Rooted in different disciplines such as ethics, ecology, law, social and political sciences, this volume explore the normative approaches, societal practices, and legal mechanisms which have emerged in the nano-field over the last two decades.
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  45.  2
    Nanotechnology and Synthetic Biology: The Ambiguity of the Nano-Bio Convergence.Louis Ujéda - 2019 - Philosophia Scientiae 23:57-72.
    Cet article étudie l’étendue de la convergence réelle entre les nanotechnologies et la biologie de synthèse, symbole des technosciences biologiques. Pour traiter la question de la dichotomie entre le niveau des objets auquel on observe un processus de pluralisation plutôt qu’une convergence, et le niveau des discours, où le scénario de la convergence semble rester l’explication dominante, nous développons une analyse des disciplines comme dispositifs au sens de Foucault. Cela permet de décrire précisément les différentes strates composant les dispositifs et (...)
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  46.  42
    Innovation and Nanotechnology: Converging Technologies and the End of Intellectual Property.David Koepsell - 2011 - London, UK: Bloomsbury Academic.
    This book defines 'nanowares' as the ideas and products arising out of nanotechnology. Koepsell argues that these rapidly developing new technologies demand a new approach to scientific discovery and innovation in our society. He takes established ideas from social philosophy and applies them to the nanoparticle world. In doing so he breaks down the subject into its elemental form and from there we are better able to understand how these elements fit into the construction of a more complex system (...)
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  47. Changing the Criminal Character: Nanotechnology and Criminal Punishment.Katrina Sifferd - 2012 - In A. Santosuosso (ed.), Proceedings of the 2011 Law and Science Young Scholars Symposium. Pavia University Press.
    This chapter examines how advances in nanotechnology might impact criminal sentencing. While many scholars have considered the ethical implications of emerging technologies, such as nanotechnology, few have considered their potential impact on crucial institutions such as our criminal justice system. Specifically, I will discuss the implications of two types of technological advances for criminal sentencing: advanced tracking devices enabled by nanotechnology, and nano-neuroscience, including neural implants. The key justifications for criminal punishment- including incapacitation, deterrence, rehabilitation, and retribution (...)
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  48. Nanotechnology” as a new keytechnology?—An attempt of a historical and systematical comparison with other technologies.Andreas Woyke - 2007 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 38 (2):329-346.
    Nanotechnology seems to be a new “key-discipline”, which should lead to basic changes in many areas of living and producing. This estimation is questioned by a comparison with established technologies, which reach from heat engines to biotechnology. In this line it is possible to come to a more realistically assessment of nanotechnology. “Technologies” in the narrower sense are understood as techniques based scientifically and integrated systematically into a network. The development of these technologies starts first in the early (...)
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  49.  10
    Nanotechnologies and Ethical Argumentation: A Philosophical Stalemate?Georges A. Legault, Johane Patenaude, Jean-Pierre Béland & Monelle Parent - 2013 - Open Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):15-22.
    When philosophers participate in the interdisciplinary ethical, environmental, economic, legal, and social analysis of nanotechnologies, what is their specific contribution? At first glance, the contribution of philosophy appears to be a clarification of the various moral and ethical arguments that are commonly presented in philosophical discussion. But if this is the only contribution of philosophy, then it can offer no more than a stalemate position, in which each moral and ethical argument nullifies all the others. To provide an alternative, we (...)
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  50.  10
    Nanotechnology in Mexico: Key Findings Based on OECD Criteria.Guillermo Foladori, Edgar Arteaga Figueroa, Edgar Záyago Lau, Richard Appelbaum, Eduardo Robles-Belmont, Liliana Villa, Rachel Parker & Vanessa Leos - 2015 - Minerva 53 (3):279-301.
    This analysis of Mexico’s nanotechnology policies utilizes indicators developed by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, which in 2008 conducted a pilot survey comparing the nanotechnology policies of 24 countries. In this paper, we apply the same questionnaire to the Mexican case, adding business information derived from the National Institute of Statistics and Geography survey on nanotechnologies, also an OECD instrument.
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