Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Nanomedicine: Building a Bridge Between Science and Law.Antonella Trisolino - 2014 - NanoEthics 8 (2):141-163.
    This article aims to address challenges of translating emerging scientific technologies into legal terms and incorporate them into the existing North American regulatory regimes. A lack of full scientific knowledge about nanomedicine technologies results in the lack of development in legal discourse to describe products and to clearly set legal standards on their safety and efficacy. The increasing complexity and hybrid nature of technologies negatively impact the functionality of “law in action” leading to a legal uncertainty and ultimately to a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Doctor Ex Machina: A Critical Assessment of the Use of Artificial Intelligence in Health Care.Annika M. Svensson & Fabrice Jotterand - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (1):155-178.
    This article examines the potential implications of the implementation of artificial intelligence in health care for both its delivery and the medical profession. To this end, the first section explores the basic features of AI and the yet theoretical concept of autonomous AI followed by an overview of current and developing AI applications. Against this background, the second section discusses the transforming roles of physicians and changes in the patient–physician relationship that could be a consequence of gradual expansion of AI (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Temporal Perspectives of the Nanotechnological Challenge to Regulation: How Human Rights Can Contribute to the Present and Future of Nanotechnologies.Daniele Ruggiu - 2013 - NanoEthics 7 (3):201-215.
    Expectations play a central role in understanding scientific and technological changes. Future-oriented representations are also central with regard to nanotechnologies as they can guide policy activities, provide structures and legitimation, attract different interests, focus policy-makers’ attention and foster investments for research. However, the emphasis on future scenarios tends to underrate the complexity of the challenges of the present market of nanotechnologies by flattening them under the needs and promises of scientific research. This is particularly apparent if we consider the viewpoint (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Anchoring European Governance: Two Versions of Responsible Research and Innovation and EU Fundamental Rights as ‘Normative Anchor Points’.Daniele Ruggiu - 2015 - NanoEthics 9 (3):217-235.
    Among the various experiments in ‘new governance’, the model of Responsible Research and Innovation is emerging in the European landscape as quite promising. Up to now, there have been two versions of RRI: a socio-empirical version which tends to underline the role of democratic processes aimed at identifying values on which governance needs to be anchored and a normative version which stresses the role of EU goals as ‘normative anchor points’ of both governance strategies and policy making. Both versions are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Nanoethics—A Collaboration Across Disciplines.Anna Julie Rasmussen, Mette Ebbesen & Svend Andersen - 2012 - NanoEthics 6 (3):185-193.
    The field of nanoscience and nanotechnology is expanding rapidly, promising great benefits for society in the form of better medicine, more efficient energy production, new types of materials, etc. Naturally, in order for the science and technology to live up to these promises, it is important to continue scientific research and development, but equally important is the ethical dimension. Giving attention to the social, ethical and legal aspects of the field, among others, will help in developing a fully responsible—and thereby (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • What Does the History of Technology Regulation Teach Us About Nano Oversight?Gary E. Marchant, Douglas J. Sylvester & Kenneth W. Abbott - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (4):724-731.
    As policy makers struggle to develop regulatory oversight models for nanotechnologies, there are important lessons that can be drawn from previous attempts to govern other emerging technologies. Five such lessons are the following: public confidence and trust in a technology and its regulatory oversight is probably the most important factor for the commercial success of a technology; regulation should avoid discriminating against particular technologies unless there is a scientifically based rationale for the disparate treatment; regulatory systems need to be flexible (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • What Does the History of Technology Regulation Teach Us About Nano Oversight?Gary E. Marchant, Douglas J. Sylvester & Kenneth W. Abbott - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (4):724-731.
    Nanotechnology is the latest in a growing list of emerging technologies that includes nuclear technologies, genetics, reproductive biology, biotechnology, information technology, robotics, communication technologies, surveillance technologies, synthetic biology, and neuroscience. As was the case for many of the technologies that came before, a key question facing nanotechnology is what type of regulatory oversight is appropriate for this emerging technology. As two of us wrote several years ago, the question facing nanotechnology is not whether it will be regulated, but when and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Editors' Overview: Forbidding Science? [REVIEW]Gary E. Marchant & Stephanie J. Bird - 2009 - Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (3):263-269.
  • Do New Ethical Issues Arise at Each Stage of Nanotechnological Development?Céline Kermisch - 2012 - NanoEthics 6 (1):29-37.
    The literature concerning ethical issues associated with nanotechnologies has become prolific. However, it has been claimed that ethical problems are only at stake with rather sophisticated nanotechnologies such as active nanostructures, integrated nanosystems and heterogeneous molecular nanosystems, whereas more basic nanotechnologies such as passive nanostructures mainly pose technical difficulties. In this paper I argue that fundamental ethical issues are already at stake with this more basic kind of nanotechnologies and that ethics impacts every kind of nanotechnologies, already from the simplest (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Invigorating 'Nanoethics': Recommendations for Improving Deliberations in Taiwan and Beyond. [REVIEW]Shawn H. E. Harmon, Shang-Yung Yen & Shu-Mei Tang - 2011 - NanoEthics 5 (3):309-318.
    Nanotechnology is the new(est) star in the high technologies sky. While nanotechnologies remain technologies of promise and potential, a growing number of nano-materials and nano-particle-reliant products are being produced. And although a growing number of academic, policy and industry reports are exploring nanotechnologies, there are very few genuine ethical assessments of nanotechnologies as they exist and might evolve in the coming years. Many questions have yet to be answered about the nature, development, and social and commercial deployment of nanotechnologies and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Wide Reflective Equilibrium as a Normative Model for Responsible Governance.Neelke Doorn - 2013 - NanoEthics 7 (1):29-43.
    Soft regulatory measures are often promoted as an alternative for existing regulatory regimes for nanotechnologies. The call for new regulatory approaches stems from several challenges that traditional approaches have difficulties dealing with. These challenges relate to general problems of governability, tensions between public interests, but also (and maybe particularly) to almost complete lack of certainty about the implications of nanotechnologies. At the same time, the field of nanotechnology can be characterized by a high level of diversity. In this paper, we (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Framing the Discussion: Nanotechnology and the Social Construction of Technology--What STS Scholars Are Saying.Stephen H. Cutcliffe, Christine M. Pense & Michael Zvalaren - 2012 - NanoEthics 6 (2):81-99.
    The emergence of nanotechnology, with all its promises of economic, social, and medical benefits, along with dire predictions of environmental, health, and safety threats, has occasioned an active debate in the Science and Technology Studies field, in which we have seen five distinct conversations that frame the discussion. The topical threads include ethics, regulation, opportunities and threats including utopian/dystopian visions of the future, public perception, public participation. These conversational distinctions are not absolutes with firm borders as they clearly overlap at (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • A Definition Framework for the Terms Nanomaterial and Nanoparticle.Max Boholm & Rickard Arvidsson - 2016 - NanoEthics 10 (1):25-40.
    Scientific writings and policy documents define the terms nanomaterial and nanoparticle in various ways. This variation is considered problematic because the absence of a shared definition is understood as potentially hindering nanomaterial knowledge production and regulation. Another view is that the existence of a shared definition may itself cause problems, as rigid definitions arguably exclude important aspects of the studied phenomena. The aim of this paper is to inform this state of disagreement by providing analytical concepts for a systematic understanding (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Evaluating Future Nanotechnology: The Net Societal Impacts of Atomically Precise Manufacturing.Steven Umbrello & Seth D. Baum - 2018 - Futures 100:63-73.
    Atomically precise manufacturing (APM) is the assembly of materials with atomic precision. APM does not currently exist, and may not be feasible, but if it is feasible, then the societal impacts could be dramatic. This paper assesses the net societal impacts of APM across the full range of important APM sectors: general material wealth, environmental issues, military affairs, surveillance, artificial intelligence, and space travel. Positive effects were found for material wealth, the environment, military affairs (specifically nuclear disarmament), and space travel. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation