Results for 'amnesia'

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  1. Collective Amnesia and Epistemic Injustice.Alessandra Tanesini - 2016 - In J. Adam Carter, Andy Clark, Jesper Kallestrup, S. Orestis Palermos & Duncan Pritchard (eds.), Socially Extended Epistemology. Oxford, UK: pp. 195-219.
    Communities often respond to traumatic events in their histories by destroying objects that would cue memories of a past they wish to forget and by building artefacts which memorialize a new version of their history. Hence, it would seem, communities cope with change by spreading memory ignorance so to allow new memories to take root. This chapter offers an account of some aspects of this phenomenon and of its epistemological consequences. Specifically, it is demonstrated in this chapter that collective forgetfulness (...)
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  2.  31
    Feminist Amnesia: The Wake of Women's Liberation.Jean Curthoys - 1997 - New York: Routledge.
    _Feminist Amnesia_ is an important challenge to contemporary academic feminism. Jean Curthoys argues that the intellectual decline of university arts education and the loss of a deep moral commitment in feminism are related phenomena. The contradiction set up by the radical ideas of the 1960s, and institutionalised life of many of its protagonists in the academy has produced a special kind of intellectual distortion. This book criticises current trends in feminist theory from the perspective of forgotten and allegedly outdated feminist (...)
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  3. Episodic memory, amnesia, and the hippocampal–anterior thalamic axis.John P. Aggleton & Malcolm W. Brown - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):425-444.
    By utilizing new information from both clinical and experimental (lesion, electrophysiological, and gene-activation) studies with animals, the anatomy underlying anterograde amnesia has been reformulated. The distinction between temporal lobe and diencephalic amnesia is of limited value in that a common feature of anterograde amnesia is damage to part of an comprising the hippocampus, the fornix, the mamillary bodies, and the anterior thalamic nuclei. This view, which can be traced back to Delay and Brion (1969), differs from other (...)
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  4. Memory, amnesia, and the past.Christoph Hoerl - 1999 - Mind and Language 14 (2):227-51.
    This paper defends the claim that, in order to have a concept of time, subjects must have memories of particular events they once witnessed. Some patients with severe amnesia arguably still have a concept of time. Two possible explanations of their grasp of this concept are discussed. They take as their respective starting points abilities preserved in the patients in question: (1) the ability to retain factual information over time despite being unable to recall the past event or situation (...)
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  5. Inattentional amnesia.Jeremy Wolfe - 1999 - Journal of Mental Imagery 29 (3-4):71-94.
  6. Collective amnesia and epistemic injustice.Alessandra Tanesini - 2016 - Imperfect Cognitions.
    Alessandra Tanesini is a Professor of Philosophy at Cardiff University working on epistemology and philosophy of language. In this post she summarises some of her recent work on collective amnesia and epistemic injustice.
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  7.  54
    Amnesia, Partial Amnesia, and Delayed Recall among Adult Survivors of Childhood Trauma.Mary R. Harvey & Judith Lewis Herman - 1994 - Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):295-306.
    Clinical experience suggests that adult survivors of childhood trauma arrive at their memories in a number of ways, with varying degrees of associated distress and uncertainty and, in some cases, after memory lapses of varying duration and extent. Among those patients who enter psychotherapy as a result of early abuse, three general patterns of traumatic recall are identified: relatively continuous and complete recall of childhood abuse experiences coupled with changing interpretations of these experiences, partial amnesia for abuse events, accompanied (...)
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  8.  72
    Amnesia, Anesthesia, and Warranted Fear.Vanessa Carbonell - 2012 - Bioethics 28 (5):245-254.
    Is a painful experience less bad for you if you will not remember it? Do you have less reason to fear it? These questions bear on how we think about medical procedures and surgeries that use an anesthesia regimen that leaves patients conscious – and potentially in pain – but results in complete ‘drug-induced amnesia’ after the fact. I argue that drug-induced amnesia does not render a painful medical procedure a less fitting object of fear, and thus the (...)
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  9.  14
    Periodical amnesia and dédoublement in case-reasoning: Writing psychological cases in late 19th-century France.Kim M. Hajek - 2020 - History of the Human Sciences 33 (3-4):95-110.
    The psychoanalytical case history was in many ways the pivot point of John Forrester’s reflections on case-based reasoning. Yet the Freudian case is not without its own textual forebears. This article closely analyses texts from two earlier case-writing traditions in order to elucidate some of the negotiations by which the case history as a textual form came to articulate the mode of reasoning that we now call ‘thinking in cases’. It reads Eugène Azam’s 1876 observation of Félida X and her (...)
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  10.  69
    Psychogenic amnesia – A malady of the constricted self☆.Angelica Staniloiu, Hans J. Markowitsch & Matthias Brand - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (3):778-801.
    Autobiographical–episodic memory is the conjunction of subjective time, autonoetic consciousness and the experiencing self. Understanding the neural correlates of autobiographical–episodic memory might therefore be essential for shedding light on the neurobiology underlying the experience of being an autonoetic self. In this contribution we illustrate the intimate relationship between autobiographical–episodic memory and self by reviewing the clinical and neuropsychological features and brain functional imaging correlates of psychogenic amnesia – a condition that is usually characterized by severely impaired retrograde memory functioning, (...)
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  11.  12
    Postcarbon Amnesia: Toward a Recognition of Racial Grief in Renewable Energy Futures.Myles Lennon - 2020 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 45 (5):934-962.
    Climate justice activists envision a “postcarbon” future that not only transforms energy infrastructures but also redresses the fossil fuel economy’s long-standing racial inequalities. Yet this anti-racist rebranding of the “zero emissions” telos does not tend to the racial grief that’s foundational to white supremacy. Accordingly, I ask: can we address racial oppression through a “just transition” to a “postcarbon” moment? In response, I connect today’s postcarbon imaginary with yesterday’s postcolonial imaginary. Drawing from research on US-based climate activism, I explore how (...)
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  12.  16
    Retrograde amnesia and priority instructions in free recall.William H. Saufley Jr & Eugene Winograd - 1970 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (1):150.
  13.  30
    Apparent amnesia on experimental memory tests in dissociative identity disorder: An exploratory study.Madelon L. Peters, Seger A. Uyterlinde, John Consemulder & Onno van der Hart - 1998 - Consciousness and Cognition 7 (1):27-41.
    Dissociative identity disorder (DID; called multiple personality disorder in DSMIII-R) is a psychiatric condition in which two or more identity states recurrently take control of the person's behavior. A characteristic feature of DID is the occurrence of apparently severe amnestic symptoms. This paper is concerned with experimental research of memory function in DID and focuses on between-identity transfer of newly learned neutral material. Previous studies on this subject are reviewed and a pilot study with four subjects is described. This study (...)
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  14.  21
    Childhood amnesia and the beginnings of memory for four early life events.JoNell A. Usher & Ulric Neisser - 1993 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 122 (2):155.
  15.  51
    Philosophical Amnesia.Nicholas Capaldi - 2009 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 65:93-128.
    Many Individuals currently identified within the academic world as ‘“professional” philosophers’ spend a great deal of time arguing about the meaning of their discipline. The situation has recently become so critical that the Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, for example, self-consciously excludes the term ‘philosophy’ from its list of entries. An outsider might get the impression that members of the profession suffer from a recurrent kind of intellectual amnesia and need constantly to be reminded about who they are and what (...)
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  16.  18
    Amnesia and metamemory demonstrate the importance of both metaphors.Bennett L. Schwartz - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):207-207.
    The correspondence metaphor is useful in developing functional models of memory. However, the storehouse metaphor is still useful in developing structural and process models of memory. Traditional research techniques explore the structure of memory; everyday techniques explore the function of memory. We illustrate this point with two examples: amnesia and metamemory. In each phenomenon, both metaphors are useful.
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  17. Pain, Amnesia, and Qualitative Memory: Conceptual and Empirical Challenges.Sabrina Coninx - 2020 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 27 (11-12):126-133.
    Barbara Montero considers whether or not we are able to remember what pain feels like. In order to properly answer this question, she introduces a new type of memory called 'qualitative memory', which seems common to exteroceptive sensations. Having concluded that there is arguably no qualitative memory for pain and other bodily sensations, Montero considers possible philosophical implications for areas including rational choice-making and empathy. In addressing the relationship between pain and memory, the paper raises an issue that has not (...)
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  18.  30
    Anaesthesia, amnesia and harm.Walter Glannon - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (10):651-657.
  19.  17
    Feigning Amnesia Moderately Impairs Memory for a Mock Crime Video.Ivan Mangiulli, Kim van Oorsouw, Antonietta Curci, Harald Merckelbach & Marko Jelicic - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
  20.  26
    Thalamic amnesia and the hippocampus: Unresolved questions and an alternative candidate.Robert G. Mair, Joshua A. Burk, M. Christine Porter & Jessica E. Ley - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):458-459.
    Aggleton & Brown have built a convincing case that hippocampus-related circuits may be involved in thalamic amnesia. It remains to be established, however, that their model represents a distinct neurological system, that the distinction between recall and familiarity captures the roles of these pathways in episodic memory, or that there are no other systems that contribute to the signs of amnesia associated with thalamic disease.
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  21.  25
    Psychogenic amnesia: implications for diachronic sense of self.Beatriz Sorrentino Marques - 2019 - Voluntas: Revista Internacional de Filosofia 10 (3):129.
    Tradicionalmente, a questão da identidade pessoal é considerada a questão a respeito ao que faz uma pessoa ser a mesma ao longo do tempo. Recentemente, porém, atenção à experiência fenomênica trouxe uma nova perspectiva ao debate. À luz dessa mudança de perspectiva, Klein sugere que indivíduos com amnésia episódica retrógrada retêm uma noção de quem são, além de terem senso de continuidade. Ele, portanto, argumenta que a memória episódica não é necessária para se ter sensação de si mesmo diacrônica. Desafiamos (...)
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  22. Amnesia I: Neuroanatomic and clinical issues.S. Zola - 2000 - In Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg (eds.), Patient-Based Approaches to Cognitive Neuroscience. MIT Press. pp. 275--290.
     
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  23.  18
    Amnesia, consolidation, and retrieval.Ralph R. Miller & Alan D. Springer - 1973 - Psychological Review 80 (1):69-79.
  24. On Amnesia and Knowing-How.David Bzdak - 2008 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 12 (1):36-47.
    In this paper, I argue that Stanley and Williamson’s 2001 account of knowledge-how as a species of knowledge-that is wrong. They argue that a claim such as “Hannah knows how to ride a bicycle” is true if and only if Hannah has some relevant knowledge-that. I challenge their claim by considering the case of a famous amnesic patient named Henry M. who is capable of acquiring and retaining new knowledge-how but who is incapable of acquiring and retaining new knowledge-that. In (...)
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  25.  8
    Dissociative amnesia: re-remembering traumatic memories.Eric Vermetten & J. Douglas Bremner - 2000 - In G. Berrios & J. Hodges (eds.), Memory Disorders in Psychiatric Practice. Cambridge University Press. pp. 400--431.
  26. Cultural Amnesia, Cultural Nostalgia and False Memory: Africa's Identity Crisis Revisited.Ali A. Mazrui - 2000 - African Philosophy 13 (2):87-98.
     
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  27.  12
    Midazolam amnesia and short-term/working memory processes.Julia Fisher, E. Hirshman, T. HenThorn, J. Arndt & A. PAssannante - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15 (1):54-63.
    We examined whether midazolam impairs short-term/working memory processes. We hypothesize that prior dissociations in midazolam’s effects on short-term/working memory tasks and episodic memory tasks arise because midazolam has a larger effect on episodic memory processes than on short-term/working memory processes. To examine these issues, .03 mg/kg of participant’s bodyweight of midazolam was administered in a double-blind placebo-controlled within-participant design. Performance on the digit span and category generation/recall tasks was examined. The results of Experiment 1 demonstrated that: midazolam impaired performance on (...)
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  28.  16
    Evaluating Amnesia in Multiple Personality Disorder.Mary Jo Nissen, James L. Ross, Daniel B. Willingham, Thomas B. Mackenzie & Daniel L. Schacter - 1994 - In R. M. Klein & B. K. Doane (eds.), Psychological concepts and dissociative disorders. Erlbaum Associates.
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  29. The Amnesia of the Modern: Arendt on the Role of Memory in the Constitution of the Political.Irene McMullin - 2011 - Philosophical Topics 39 (2):91-116.
    In this paper I consider the essential role that public memory plays in the establishment and maintenance of the political arena and its space of appearance. Without this space and the shared memory that allows it to appear, Hannah Arendt argues, transience and finitude would consume the excellence of word and deed—just as the "natural ruin of time" consumes its mortal performer. The modern era displays a kind of mnemonic failure, however, a situation arising not only from technological developments that (...)
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  30.  19
    Amnesia and Psychological Continuity.Andrew Brennan - 1985 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 15 (sup1):195-209.
  31. Betrayal trauma: Traumatic amnesia as an adaptive response to childhood abuse.Jennifer J. Freyd - 1994 - Ethics and Behavior 4 (4):307 – 329.
    Betrayal trauma theory suggests that psychogenic amnesia is an adaptive response to childhood abuse. When a parent or other powerful figure violates a fundamental ethic of human relationships, victims may need to remain unaware of the trauma not to reduce suffering but rather to promote survival. Amnesia enables the child to maintain an attachment with a figure vital to survival, development, and thriving. Analysis of evolutionary pressures, mental modules, social cognitions, and developmental needs suggests that the degree to (...)
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  32.  22
    Decision-making in amnesia: Do advantageous decisions require conscious knowledge of previous behavioural choices?Klemens Gutbrod, Claudine Krouzel, Helene Hofer, René Müri, Walter J. Perrig & Radek Ptak - 2006 - Neuropsychologia 44 (8):1315-1324.
  33.  11
    Social Amnesia. A Critique of Conformist Psychology from Adler to Laing.E. Sherover - 1975 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1975 (25):196-210.
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  34.  2
    Amnesia 111 cognitive.Tim Curran & Daniel L. Schacter - 2000 - In Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg (eds.), Patient-Based Approaches to Cognitive Neuroscience. MIT Press. pp. 291.
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  35. Amnesia and Psychological Continuity.Andrew Brennan - 1985 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 11:195.
  36.  12
    Autonomic response in posthypnotic amnesia.M. E. Bitterman & F. L. Marcuse - 1945 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 35 (3):248.
  37. Amnesia.A. R. Mayes & N. M. Hunkin - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
     
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  38.  21
    Amnesia for the trauma itself?Richard J. McNally - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (6):271-277.
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  39.  7
    Amnesia Instead of Anesthesia: Not Always a Question of Consent.R. D. Truog & D. Waisel - 1994 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 5 (2):153-155.
  40. Anesthesia, amnesia, and the cognitive unconscious.John F. Kihlstrom & Daniel L. Schacter - 1990 - In B. Bonke, W. Fitch, K. Millar, amnesia Anesthesia & 1990 the cognitive unconscious. (eds.), Memory and Awareness in Anesthesia. Swets & Zeitlinger.
  41.  14
    Retrograde amnesia: Storage failure versus retrieval failure.Paul E. Gold & Richard A. King - 1974 - Psychological Review 81 (5):465-469.
  42. Retrograde-amnesia following damage to the hippocampal-formation in monkeys.Lr Squire & S. Zolamorgan - 1990 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (6):524-524.
  43.  21
    Legal Amnesia: Modernism Versus the Republican Tradition in American Legal Thought.Andrew Fraser - 1984 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1984 (60):15-52.
    Not so very long ago — that is to say during the late sixties and early seventies — most Left lawyers understood the law as an ideological and repressive force imposed upon oppressed individuals, groups and classes from without. Viewed from the eye of the political storm surrounding the antiwar and Black liberation struggles, the conclusion that the law was a prime instrument of ruling class hegemony seemed obvious. Before the bar of progressive opinion, radicals presented their indictment of the (...)
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  44.  12
    Legal Amnesia: Modernism Versus the Republican Tradition in American Legal Thought.A. Fraser - 1984 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1984 (60):15-52.
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  45.  29
    Theoretical Amnesia.Moishe Gonzales - 1985 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1985 (65):163-170.
    Conventional wisdom has it that there is — or at least there ought to be — a correspondence between theoretical and political positions. But the very labelling of it as conventional wisdom already betrays its falsity. Sure enough, any careful examination of the record readily reveals that this correspondence hardly ever obtains. No such parallel can be drawn for the Hegelians who split into Right and Left wings with qualitatively different positions, e.g., the German Young Hegelians and the British neo-Hegelians (...)
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    Theoretical Amnesia.M. Gonzales - 1985 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1985 (65):163-170.
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  47.  92
    Hypnotic behavior: A social-psychological interpretation of amnesia, analgesia, and “trance logic”.Nicholas P. Spanos - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):449-467.
    This paper examines research on three hypnotic phenomena: suggested amnesia, suggested analgesia, and “trance logic.” For each case a social-psychological interpretation of hypnotic behavior as a voluntary response strategy is compared with the traditional special-process view that “good” hypnotic subjects have lost conscious control over suggestion-induced behavior. I conclude that it is inaccurate to describe hypnotically amnesic subjects as unable to recall the material they have been instructed to forget. Although amnesics present themselves as unable to remember, they in (...)
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  48.  52
    Anesthesia, amnesia, and the memory/awareness distinction.Eric Eich, J. L. Reeves & R. L. Katz - 1985 - Anesthesia and Analgesia 64:1143-48.
  49.  21
    Midazolam amnesia and conceptual processing in implicit memory.Elliot Hirshman, Anthony Passannante & Jason Arndt - 2001 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (3):453.
  50. Detecting amnesia's imposters.J. Brandt - 1992 - In L. R. Squire & N. Butters (eds.), Neuropsychology of Memory. Guilford Press. pp. 156--165.
     
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