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  1. Special Attention to the Self: A Mechanistic Model of Patient RB’s Lost Feeling of Ownership.Hunter Gentry - forthcoming - Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-29.
    Patient RB has a peculiar memory impairment wherein he experiences his memories in rich contextual detail, but claims to not own them. His memories do not feel as if they happened to him. In this paper, I provide an explanatory model of RB's phenomenology, the self-attentional model. I draw upon recent work in neuroscience on self-attentional processing and global workspace models of conscious recollection to show that RB has a self-attentional deficit that inhibits self-bias processes in broadcasting the contents of (...)
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  2. Forgetting What Must Be Forgotten: Advocating an Ethical Memory Model for Artificial Companions.P. A. Vargas, Y. Fernaeus, M. Y. Lim, S. Enz, W. C. Ho, M. Jacobsson & R. Aylett - forthcoming - Special Issue of Ai and Society: Killer Robots or Friendly Fridges: The Social Understanding of Artificial Intelligence.
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  3. Are Forgotten Memories Literal Experiences of Absences? Episodic Forgetting and Metacognitive Feelings.Marta Caravà - 2022 - Acta Scientiarum. Human and Social Sciences 43 (3):e61021.
    Are occurrent states of forgetting literal experiences of absences? I situate this question within the debate on mental time travel (MTT) to understand whether these states can be explained as literal experiences of absent episodic memories. To frame my argument, I combine Barkasi and Rosen’s literal approach to MTT with Farennikova’s literal approach to the perception of absences, showing that both are built on the idea that for an experience to be literal it must afford an unmediated contact with the (...)
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  4. An exploration into enactive forms of forgetting.Marta Caravà - 2021 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 20 (4):703-722.
    Remembering and forgetting are the two poles of the memory system. Consequently, any approach to memory should be able to explain both remembering and forgetting in order to gain a comprehensive and insightful understanding of the memory system. Can an enactive approach to memory processes do so? In this article I propose a possible way to provide a positive answer to this question. In line with some current enactive approaches to memory, I suggest that forgetting –similarly to remembering– might be (...)
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  5. What Have We Learned About the Engram?Jonathan Najenson - 2021 - Synthese 199 (3-4):9581-9601.
    The discovery of the engram, the physical substrate of memory, is a central challenge for the sciences of memory. Following the application of optogenetics to the neurobiological study of memory, scientists and philosophers claim that the engram has been found. In this paper, I evaluate the implications of applying optogenetic tools to the localization of the engram. I argue that conceptions of engram localization need to be revised to be made consistent with optogenetic studies of the engram. I distinguish between (...)
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  6. On the Difference Between Episodic and Autobiographical Memories.Gabriel Zaccaro - 2021 - Aporia 21:65-78.
    Is there a difference between recollecting episodes from the past and recalling autobiographically? Both in the philosophical and psychological literature, it does not seem that there is a consensus on whether autobiographical memories should be considered as a metaphysically equivalent concept to episodic memories or a different category of memory entirely. In this article, I give reasons to believe that autobiographical memories do not relate to the recollection of past episodes since they do not have an associated subjective experience and (...)
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  7. Finita la commedia.Andrej Poleev - 2020 - Enzymes 18.
    Искусственный интеллект – последняя, хотя и иллюзорная надежда продажных и провалившихся режимов как на Западе, так и на Востоке остаться на плаву: ведь тонущий хватается и за соломинку. Но всё течёт и всё изменяется, и никаким деспотиям и деспотам не удастся остановить ход истории, как бы они этого не желали и тому не противились. Хотя у истории нет конца, но их история и история совершённых ими предательств уже закончилась. Plaudite, cives, plaudite, amici, finita est comoedia: „Рукоплещите, граждане, друзья, комедия окончена.“.
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  8. An Essay on the Ontological Foundations and Psychological Realization of Forgetting.Stan Klein - 2019 - Psychology of Consciousness: Theory, Research, and Practice 6 (292-305).
    I argue that appreciation of the phenomenon of forgetting requires serious attention to its origins and place in nature. This, in turn, necessitates metaphysical inquiry as well as empirical backing – a combination likely to be eschewed by psychological orthodoxy. But, if we hope to avoid the conceptual vacuity that characterizes too much of contemporary psychological inquiry (e.g., Klein, 2012, 2014a, 2015a, 2016a), a “big picture” approach to phenomena of interest is essential. Adopting this investigative posture turns the “received view” (...)
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  9. Forgetting.Matthew Frise - 2018 - In Kourken Michaelian, Dorothea Debus & Denis Perrin (eds.), New Directions in the Philosophy of Memory. Routledge. pp. 223-240.
    Forgetting is importantly related to remembering, evidence possession, epistemic virtue, personal identity, and a host of highly-researched memory conditions. In this paper I examine the nature of forgetting. I canvass the viable options for forgetting’s ontological category, type of content, characteristic relation to content, and scale. I distinguish several theories of forgetting in the philosophy and psychology of memory literatures, theories that diverge on these options. The best theories from the literature, I claim, fail two critical tests that I develop (...)
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  10. Collective Amnesia and Epistemic Injustice.Alessandra Tanesini - 2018 - In J. Adam Carter, Andy Clark, Jesper Kallestrup, S. Orestis Palermos & Duncan Pritchard (eds.), Socially Extended Epistemology. Oxford, UK: pp. 195-219.
    Communities often respond to traumatic events in their histories by destroying objects that would cue memories of a past they wish to forget and by building artefacts which memorialize a new version of their history. Hence, it would seem, communities cope with change by spreading memory ignorance so to allow new memories to take root. This chapter offers an account of some aspects of this phenomenon and of its epistemological consequences. Specifically, it is demonstrated in this chapter that collective forgetfulness (...)
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  11. Forgetting: An Interdisciplinary Converstion.Giovanni Galizia & David Shulman (eds.) - 2015 - Magnes Press.
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  12. A Little Bias Goes a Long Way: The Effects of Feedback on the Strategic Regulation of Accuracy on Formula-Scored Tests.Michelle M. Arnold, Philip A. Higham & Beatriz Martín-Luengo - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 19 (4):383-402.
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  13. Confabulation.William Hirstein - 2013 - In Harold Pashler (ed.), Encyclopedia of the mind. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE publications. pp. 183-186.
  14. Philosophical Amnesia.Nicholas Capaldi - 2009 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 65:93-128.
    Many Individuals currently identified within the academic world as ‘“professional” philosophers’ spend a great deal of time arguing about the meaning of their discipline. The situation has recently become so critical that the Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy, for example, self-consciously excludes the term ‘philosophy’ from its list of entries. An outsider might get the impression that members of the profession suffer from a recurrent kind of intellectual amnesia and need constantly to be reminded about who they are and what their (...)
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  15. Emotion, Memory, and Trauma.Glenn W. Most - 2009 - In Richard Eldridge (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Literature. Oup Usa.
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  16. Ruin and Memory.Enrique Gavilán Domínguez - 2008 - Arbor 184 (731).
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  17. Forgetting Aborigines. [REVIEW]Diane Molloy - 2008 - Colloquy 16:275-279.
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  18. Memory, History, Forgetting.Kathleen Blamey & David Pellauer (eds.) - 2006 - University of Chicago Press.
    Why do major historical events such as the Holocaust occupy the forefront of the collective consciousness, while profound moments such as the Armenian genocide, the McCarthy era, and France's role in North Africa stand distantly behind? Is it possible that history "overly remembers" some events at the expense of others? A landmark work in philosophy, Paul Ricoeur's _Memory, History, Forgetting_ examines this reciprocal relationship between remembering and forgetting, showing how it affects both the perception of historical experience and the production (...)
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  19. A Treatment for Survivors of Sexual Assault Suffering Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (Vol 13, Pg 275, 2005).C. Lefkowitz, M. Prout, J. Bleiberg, I. Paharia & D. Debiak - 2006 - Society and Animals 14 (1):II.
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  20. Amnesia for the Trauma Itself?Richard J. McNally - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (6):271-277.
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  21. Echolalias: On the Forgetting of Language.Daniel Heller-Roazen - 2005 - Zone Books.
    Just as speech can be acquired, so can it be lost. Speakers can forget words, phrases, even entire languages they once knew; over the course of time peoples, too, let go of the tongues that were once theirs, as languages disappear and give way to the others that follow them. In Echolalias, Daniel Heller-Roazen reflects on the many forms of linguistic forgetfulness, offering a far-reaching philosophical investigation into the persistence and disappearance of speech. In twenty-one brief chapters, he moves among (...)
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  22. How Forgetting Aids Heuristic Inference.Lael J. Schooler & Ralph Hertwig - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (3):610-628.
    Some theorists, ranging from W. James to contemporary psychologists, have argued that forgetting is the key to proper functioning of memory. The authors elaborate on the notion of beneficial forgetting by proposing that loss of information aids inference heuristics that exploit mnemonic information. To this end, the authors bring together 2 research programs that take an ecological approach to studying cognition. Specifically, they implement fast and frugal heuristics within the ACT-R cognitive architecture. Simulations of the recognition heuristic, which relies on (...)
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  23. Memory, History, Forgetting.Kathleen Blamey & David Pellauer (eds.) - 2004 - University of Chicago Press.
    Why do major historical events such as the Holocaust occupy the forefront of the collective consciousness, while profound moments such as the Armenian genocide, the McCarthy era, and France's role in North Africa stand distantly behind? Is it possible that history "overly remembers" some events at the expense of others? A landmark work in philosophy, Paul Ricoeur's _Memory, History, Forgetting_ examines this reciprocal relationship between remembering and forgetting, showing how it affects both the perception of historical experience and the production (...)
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  24. A Theory of Autobiographical Memory: Necessary Components and Disorders Resulting From Their Loss.Stanley B. Klein, Tim P. German, Leda Cosmides & Rami Gabriel - 2004 - Social Cognition 22:460-490.
    In this paper we argue that autobiographical memory can be conceptualized as a mental state resulting from the interplay of a set of psychological capacities?self-reflection, self-agency, self-ownership and personal temporality?that transform a memorial representation into an autobiographical personal experience. We first review evidence from a variety of clinical domains?for example, amnesia, autism, frontal lobe pathology, schizophrenia?showing that breakdowns in any of the proposed components can produce impairments in autobiographical recollection, and conclude that the self-reflection, agency, ownership, and personal temporality are (...)
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  25. Déjà Vu: Aberrations of Cultural Memory.Peter Krapp - 2004 - Univ of Minnesota Press.
    Referring to a past that never was, dij vu shares a structure not only with fiction, but also with the ever more sophisticated effects of media technology. Tracing the term from the end of the nineteenth century, when it was first popularized in the pages of the Revue philosophique, Peter Krapp examines the genealogy and history of the singular and unrepeatable experience of dij vu. This provocative book offers a refreshing counterpoint to the clichid celebrations of cultural memory and forces (...)
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  26. M. Gerard Fromm Psychoanalysis and Trauma: September 11 Revisited.Ramsay MacMullen - 2004 - Diogenes 51 (3):145-149.
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  27. Memory, History, Forgetting.Paul Ricoeur - 2004 - University of Chicago Press.
    Firstly, Paul Ricoeur takes a phenomenological approach to memory. He then addresses recent work by historians by reopening the question of the nature and truth of historical knowledge. Finally, he describes the necessity of forgetting as a condition for the possibility of remembering.
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  28. On Common Ground: Jost's Law of Forgetting and Ribot's Law of Retrograde Amnesia.John T. Wixted - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (4):864-879.
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  29. Recollection Rejection: False-Memory Editing in Children and Adults.C. J. Brainerd, V. F. Reyna, Ron Wright & A. H. Mojardin - 2003 - Psychological Review 110 (4):762-784.
  30. The Loss of Episodic Memories in Retrograde Amnesia: Single-Case and Group Studies.Michael D. Kopelman & Narinder Kapur - 2002 - In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. Oxford University Press.
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  31. Dissociations in Cognitive Memory: The Syndrome of Developmental Amnesia.Faraneh Vargha-Khadem, David G. Gadian & Mortimer Mishkin - 2002 - In Alan Baddeley, John Aggleton & Martin Conway (eds.), Episodic Memory: New Directions in Research. Oxford University Press.
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  32. Memory, Trauma, and Embodied Distress: The Management of Disruption in the Stories of Cambodians in Exile.Gay Becker, Yewoubdar Beyene & Pauline Ken - 2000 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 28 (3):320-345.
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  33. Cultural Amnesia, Cultural Nostalgia and False Memory: Africa's Identity Crisis Revisited.Ali A. Mazrui - 2000 - African Philosophy 13 (2):87-98.
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  34. Korsakoff Syndrome: The Amnesic Self.Kathinka Evers - 1999 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 13 (2):193-208.
    The belief that memory is essential to the self is common. Extreme amnesia, e.g., Korsakoff Syndrome, is held to dissolve the afflicted person’s self. This belief is a misconception that rests on a confusion of epistemic with ontological relevance. Epistemically, memory is relevant to the self: a subject’s self-knowledge partly depends on memories of past experiences. However, it is not by virtue of these memories that the subject is a self: ontologically, memory is irrelevant to that status. The fact that (...)
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  35. Korsakoff Syndrome: The Amnesic Self.Kathinka Evers - 1999 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 13 (2):193-208.
    The belief that memory is essential to the self is common. Extreme amnesia, e.g., Korsakoff Syndrome, is held to dissolve the afflicted person’s self. This belief is a misconception that rests on a confusion of epistemic with ontological relevance. Epistemically, memory is relevant to the self: a subject’s self-knowledge partly depends on memories of past experiences. However, it is not by virtue of these memories that the subject is a self: ontologically, memory is irrelevant to that status. The fact that (...)
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  36. The Trauma Client's Experience of Eye Movement Densensitization and Reprocessing: A Heuristic Analysis.Marilyn A. Schleyer - 1999 - Dissertation, The Union Institute
    Traumatic stress and its impact on the individual, family and society have been described in the literature for over one hundred years. Controversy exists regarding etiology, determinants and therapeutic intervention for traumatic stress. There is limited research regarding the comparative value of treatment of trauma. In 1989 Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing emerged as a therapeutic intervention for traumatic stress. Studies have shown the benefits of EMDR to be equal to or superior to those of other therapies in the treatment (...)
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  37. The Controversy Over Recovered Memories.Md Thomas Gutheil - 1999 - Lahey Clinic Medical Ethics Journal 1:4-8.
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  38. Memory and Amnesia: An Introduction.Alan J. Parkin - 1997 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Memory and Amnesia: An Introduction provides a clear and comprehensive account of amnesia set in the context of our understanding of how normal memory operates. Part 1 provides the reader with an up-to-date survey of contemporary memory theories. Part 2 deals with amnesia, incorporating all important new developments, and focuses on the nature and explanation of the amnesic syndrome.
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  39. Michael S. Roth, The Ironist's Cage: Memory, Trauma, and the Construction of History Reviewed By.Shawn Smith - 1996 - Philosophy in Review 16 (1):52-54.
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  40. Retrograde-Amnesia Following Damage to the Hippocampal-Formation in Monkeys.Lr Squire & S. Zolamorgan - 1990 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (6):524-524.
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  41. Boundaries of Childhood Amnesia.J. A. Usher - 1989 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (6):519-519.
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  42. Troubles with Memory.Ka Donders, J. W. Schooler & E. F. Loftus - 1987 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 25 (5):351-351.
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  43. Hypermnesia-Output Interference and Forgetting.Sm Smith & E. Vela - 1987 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 25 (5):324-324.
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  44. A Neuropsychological Study of Fact Memory and Source Amnesia.Ap Shimamura & Lr Squire - 1986 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 24 (5):325-325.
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  45. Theoretical Amnesia.M. Gonzales - 1985 - Télos 1985 (65):163-170.
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  46. Directed Forgetting in Context.Mark Rilling, Donald F. Kendrick & Thomas B. Stonebraker - 1984 - In Gordon H. Bower (ed.), The Psychology of Learning and Motivation. Academic Press. pp. 18--175.
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  47. Implications of Recovery From Experimental Amnesia.Ralph R. Miller & Alan D. Springer - 1974 - Psychological Review 81 (5):470-473.
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  48. Amnesia, Consolidation, and Retrieval.Ralph R. Miller & Alan D. Springer - 1973 - Psychological Review 80 (1):69-79.
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  49. "Sources of Experimental Amnesia": Erratum.Donald J. Lewis - 1970 - Psychological Review 77 (3):254-254.
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  50. Sources of Experimental Amnesia.Donald J. Lewis - 1969 - Psychological Review 76 (5):461-472.
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1 — 50 / 53