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Tad M. Schmaltz [61]Tad Matthew Schmaltz [1]
  1.  78
    Descartes on Causation.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2007 - New York, US: Oup Usa.
    This book is a systematic study of Descartes' theory of causation and its relation to the medieval and early modern scholastic philosophy that provides its proper historical context. The argument presented here is that even though Descartes offered a dualistic ontology that differs radically from what we find in scholasticism, his views on causation were profoundly influenced by scholastic thought on this issue. This influence is evident not only in his affirmation in the Meditations of the abstract scholastic axioms that (...)
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  2.  19
    The Metaphysics of the Material World: Suárez, Descartes, Spinoza.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2019 - New York: Oxford University Press.
  3.  14
    Early Modern Cartesianisms: Dutch and French Constructions.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2016 - New York, NY: Oxford University Press USA.
    There is a general sense that the philosophy of Descartes was a dominant force in early modern thought. Since the work in the nineteenth century of French historians of Cartesian philosophy, however, there has been no fully contextualized comparative examination of the various receptions of Descartes in different portions of early modern Europe. This study addresses the need for a more current understanding of these receptions by considering the different constructions of Descartes's thought that emerged in the Calvinist United Provinces (...)
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  4.  44
    Radical Cartesianism: The French Reception of Descartes.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2002 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This is a book-length study of two of Descartes's most innovative successors, Robert Desgabets and Pierre-Sylvain Regis, and of their highly original contributions to Cartesianism. The focus of the book is an analysis of radical doctrines in the work of these thinkers that derive from arguments in Descartes: on the creation of eternal truths, on the intentionality of ideas, and on the soul-body union. As well as relating their work to that of fellow Cartesians such as Malebranche and Arnauld, the (...)
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  5.  78
    Malebranche's theory of the soul: a Cartesian interpretation.Tad M. Schmaltz - 1996 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    This book offers a provocative interpretation of the theory of the soul in the writings of the French Cartesian, Nicolas Malebranche (1638-1715). Though recent work on Malebranche's philosophy of mind has tended to emphasize his account of ideas, Schmaltz focuses rather on his rejection of Descartes' doctrine that the mind is better known than the body. In particular, he considers and defends Malebranche's argument that this rejection has a Cartesian basis. Schmaltz reveals that this argument not only provides a fresh (...)
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  6. Descartes on Causation.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2006 - Studia Leibnitiana 38 (2):248-250.
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  7. Learning from Six Philosophers: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2002 - Mind 111 (442):367-373.
  8. Descartes and Malebranche on mind and mind-body union.Tad M. Schmaltz - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (2):281-325.
  9. Platonism and Descartes' View of Immutable Essences.Tad M. Schmaltz - 1991 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 73 (2):129-170.
  10.  33
    Suárez and Descartes on the Mode(s) of Union.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (3):471-492.
    in a january 1642 letter, rené descartes advises his correspondent—his then-follower, the Utrecht medical professor Henricus Regius—to consistently endorse the view that the human mind is related to its body by means of a "substantial union": Whenever the occasion arises, as much privately as publicly, you ought to profess that you believe a human to be a true ens per se and not per accidens and the mind to be really and substantially united to the body not through position or (...)
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  11.  51
    Princess Elisabeth of Bohemia on the Cartesian Mind: Interaction, Happiness, Freedom.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2019 - In Eileen O’Neill & Marcy P. Lascano (eds.), Feminist History of Philosophy: The Recovery and Evaluation of Women’s Philosophical Thought. Springer, NM 87747, USA: Springer. pp. 155-173.
    This chapter is a re-consideration of the powerful set of objections to the Cartesian theory of mind that Princess Elisabeth offered in her 1643–49 correspondence with Descartes. Much of the scholarly discussion of this correspondence has focused on Elisabeth’s initial criticisms of Descartes’ views of mind–body interaction and union, and has presented these criticisms as assuming the general principle that objects with heterogeneous natures cannot interact. However, this account of the criticisms fails to capture not only their basic import, but (...)
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  12. The curious case of Henricus Regius.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2019 - In Steven Nadler, Tad M. Schmaltz & Delphine Antoine-Mahut (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Descartes and Cartesianism. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
     
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  13.  41
    The Oxford Handbook of Descartes and Cartesianism.Steven Nadler, Tad M. Schmaltz & Delphine Antoine-Mahut (eds.) - 2019 - Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    The Oxford Handbook of Descartes and Cartesianism comprises fifty specially written chapters on Rene Descartes and Cartesianism, the dominant paradigm for philosophy and science in the seventeenth century, written by an international group of leading scholars of early modern philosophy. The first part focuses on the various aspects of Descartes's biography and philosophy, with chapters on his epistemology, method, metaphysics, physics, mathematics, moral philosophy, political thought, medical thought, and aesthetics. The chapters of the second part are devoted to the defense, (...)
  14.  78
    The Disappearance Of Analogy in Descartes, Spinoza, and Regis.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2000 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 30 (1):85-113.
    This article considers complications for the principle in Descartes that effects are similar to their causes that are connected to his own denial that terms apply "univocally" to God and the creatures He produces. Descartes suggested that there remains an "analogical" relation in virtue of which our mind can be said to be similar to God's. However, this suggestion is undermined by the implication of his doctrine of the creation of the eternal truths that God's will differs entirely from our (...)
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  15.  28
    Quantity and Extension in Suárez and Descartes.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2020 - Vivarium 58 (3):168-190.
    This paper compares the development of the notion of continuous quantity in the work of Francisco Suárez and René Descartes. The discussion begins with a consideration of Suárez’s rejection of the view – common to ‘realists’ such as Thomas Aquinas and ‘nominalists’ such as William of Ockham – that quantity is inseparable from the extension of material integral parts. Crucial here is Suárez’s view that quantified extension exhibits a kind of impenetrability that distinguishes it from other kinds of extension. This (...)
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  16. Spinoza's mediate infinite mode.Tad M. Schmaltz - 1997 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 35 (2):199-235.
    Spinoza's Mediate Infinite Mode TAD M. SCHMALTZ IN PART I of the Ethics, Spinoza argued that a modification is infinite just in case it either "follows from the absolute nature of any attribute of God" or "follows from some attribute of God, as it is modified by such a modification" that is infinite. 1 The main purpose of this argument is to bolster the claim later in this text that a finite modification can follow from a divine attribute only insofar (...)
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  17.  60
    The Metaphysics of Rest in Descartes and Malebranche.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2015 - Res Philosophica 92 (1):21-40.
    I consider a somewhat obscure but important feature of Descartes’s physics that concerns the notion of the “force of rest.” Contrary to a prominent occasionalist interpretation of Descartes’s physics, I argue that Descartes himself attributes real forces to resting bodies. I also take his account of rest to conflict with the view that God conserves the world by “re-creating” it anew at each moment. I turn next to the role of rest in Malebranche. Malebranche takes Descartes to endorse his own (...)
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  18.  24
    Spinoza's Mereology.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2021 - In Yitzhak Y. Melamed (ed.), A Companion to Spinoza. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. pp. 135–143.
    Spinoza seems to argue both that “God or Nature” is mereologically simple, and that this being is mereologically complex insofar as it is composed of parts. This chapter proposes on Spinoza's behalf a resolution of this antinomy. This resolution focuses on Spinoza's mereology of the material world. It offers an alternative interpretation according to which Spinoza adheres both to the indivisibility of extended substance and to the reality of the finite modal parts that compose an infinite modal whole. In the (...)
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  19.  12
    Efficient Causation: A History.Tad M. Schmaltz (ed.) - 2014 - , US: Oup Usa.
    This volume is a collection of new essays by specialists that trace the concept of efficient causation from its discovery in Ancient Greece, through its development in late antiquity, the medieval period, and modern philosophy, to its use in contemporary metaphysics and philosophy of science.
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  20.  61
    Spinoza on the Vacuum.Tad M. Schmaltz - 1999 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 81 (2):174-205.
  21.  4
    The Disappearance of Analogy in Descartes, Spinoza, and Régis.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2000 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 30 (1):85-113.
  22. Occasionalism and mechanism: Fontenelle's objections to Malebranche.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2008 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):293 – 313.
    It is well known that the French Cartesian Nicolas Malebranche (1638–1715) was both an occasionalist in metaphysics and a mechanist in physics. He consistently argued that God is the only true caus...
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  23. What Has History of Science to Do with History of Philosophy?Tad M. Schmaltz - 2013 - In Mogens Laerke, Justin E. H. Smith & Eric Schliesser (eds.), Philosophy and Its History: Aims and Methods in the Study of Early Modern Philosophy. New York, US: Oxford University Press USA.
    In this chapter I consider the relation of history of philosophy to the history of science. I argue that though these two disciplines are naturally linked, they also have special commitments that distinguish each from the other. I begin with the history of the history of science, a discipline that was once allied with philosophy of science but that has increasingly evolved toward social history. Then I consider the debate over whether the history of philosophy is essential for, or rather (...)
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  24.  45
    Malebranche’s Theory of the Soul: A Cartesian Interpretation.Fred Ablondi & Tad M. Schmaltz - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (2):334.
    While there has been a resurgence in Malebranche scholarship in the anglophone world over the last twenty years, most of it has focused on Malebranche’s theory of ideas, and little attention has been paid to his philosophy of mind. Schmaltz’s book thus comes as a welcome addition to the Malebranche literature; that he has given us such a well-researched and carefully argued study is even more welcome. The focus of this work is Malebranche’s split with Descartes on the question of (...)
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  25. Cartesian causation: body–body interaction, motion, and eternal truths.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (4):737-762.
    There is considerable debate among scholars over whether Descartes allowed for genuine body–body interaction. I begin by considering Michael Della Rocca’s recent claim that Descartes accepted such interaction, and that his doctrine of the creation of the eternal truths indicates how this interaction could be acceptable to him. Though I agree that Descartes was inclined to accept real bodily causes of motion, I differ from Della Rocca in emphasizing that his ontology ultimately does not allow for them. This is not (...)
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  26. Descartes on innate ideas, sensation, and scholasticism: The response to Regius.Tad M. Schmaltz - 1997 - In M. A. Stewart (ed.), Studies in Seventeenth-Century European Philosophy. Clarendon Press.
     
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  27. Sensation, Occasionalism, and Descartes' Causal Principles.Tad M. Schmaltz - 1992 - In Phillip D. Cummins & Guenter Zoeller (eds.), Minds, Ideas, and Objects: Essays in the Theory of Representation in Modern Philosophy. Ridgeview Publishing Company.
  28.  34
    What Has Cartesianism To Do with Jansenism?Tad M. Schmaltz - 1999 - Journal of the History of Ideas 60 (1):37-56.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:What Has Cartesianism To Do with Jansenism?Tad M. SchmaltzMy title is modeled on the famous query of the third-century theologian, Tertullian: “What has Athens to do with Jerusalem?” Tertullian’s question asks what pagan Greek learning has to do with the theology of the early Church. By comparison my question asks what philosophical Cartesianism has to do with theological Jansenism, and more specifically what these movements had to do with (...)
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  29.  45
    Galileo and Descartes on Copernicanism and the cause of the tides.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 51:70-81.
  30.  26
    Malebranche's Cartesianism and Lockean Colors.Tad M. Schmaltz - 1995 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 12 (4):387-403.
  31.  52
    The Metaphysics of Surfaces in Suárez and Descartes.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2019 - Philosophers' Imprint 19.
    In his discussions of the Eucharist, Descartes gives prominent place to the notion of the “surfaces” of bodies. Given this context, it may seem that his account of surfaces is of limited interest. However, I hope to show that such an account is in fact linked to a philosophically significant medieval debate over whether certain mathematical “indivisibles”, including surfaces, really exist in nature. Moreover, the particular emphasis in Descartes on the fact that surfaces are modes rather than parts of bodies (...)
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  32. Descartes on the Metaphysics of the Material World.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2018 - Philosophical Review 127 (1):1-40.
    It is a matter of continuing scholarly dispute whether Descartes offers a metaphysics of the material world that is “monist” or “pluralist.” One passage that has become crucial to this debate is from the Synopsis of the Meditations, in which Descartes argues that since “body taken in general” is a substance, and since all substances are “by their nature incorruptible,” this sort of body is incorruptible as well. In this article I defend a pluralist reading of this passage, according to (...)
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  33.  17
    Historical Dictionary of Descartes and Cartesian Philosophy.Roger Ariew, Dennis Des Chene, Douglas Michael Jesseph, Tad M. Schmaltz & Theo Verbeek - 2003 - Lanham, Md.: Scarecrow Press. Edited by Dennis Des Chene, Douglas Michael Jesseph, Tad M. Schmaltz & Theo Verbeek.
    This is a dictionary of Descartes and Cartesian philosophy, primarily covering philosophy in the 17th century, with a chronology and biography of Descartes's life and times and a bibliography of primary and secondary works related to Descartes and to Cartesians.
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  34. Malebranche and Leibniz on the best of all possible worlds.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (1):28-48.
    In this article I explore Leibniz's claim in the Theodicy that on the essential points Malebranche's theodicy "reduces to" his own view. This judgment may seem to be warranted given that both thinkers emphasize that evils are justified by the fact that they follow from the simple and uniform laws that govern that world which is worthy of divine creation. However, I argue that Leibniz's theodicy differs in several crucial respects from Malebranche's. I begin with a qualified endorsement of Charles (...)
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  35.  5
    The Early Dutch Reception of L’Homme.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2016 - In Stephen Gaukroger & Delphine Antoine-Mahut (eds.), Descartes' Treatise on Man and Its Reception. Springer.
    This is a consideration of the connection of L’Homme to two very different forms of early modern Dutch Cartesianism. On the one hand, this work was central to a dispute between Descartes and his former disciple, Henricus Regius. In particular, Descartes charged that Regius had plagiarized L’Homme in order to distance himself from a form of Cartesian physiology in Regius that is not founded on a proof of the spirituality of the human soul. Despite this repudiation, Regius remained a prominent (...)
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  36. Moral evil and divine concurrence in the Theodicy.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2014 - In Larry M. Jorgensen & Samuel Newlands (eds.), New Essays on Leibniz’s Theodicy. Oxford University Press.
  37.  35
    The Cartesian refutation of idealism.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2002 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (4):513-540.
  38.  10
    Gueroult on Spinoza and the Ethics.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2020 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 291 (1):51-62.
    Cet article concerne l’application de la méthode « dianoématique », ou « étude des doctrines », dans le commentaire important de Martial Gueroult aux deux premières parties de l’ Éthique de Spinoza. Gueroult met l’accent sur deux affirmations distinctes dans les deux volumes de ce commentaire. La première affirmation, tirée du premier volume, est que Spinoza adopte une version du monisme dans la première partie de l’ Éthique selon laquelle Dieu, en tant que substance infinie, consiste en une union d’une (...)
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  39.  36
    Descartes and the Ontology of Everyday Life.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2021 - Philosophical Review 130 (4):587-591.
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  40.  35
    JHP and History of Philosophy Today.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (4):477-481.
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  41.  23
    Introduction: Material Substance and Quantity, from Suárez to Leibniz.Jean-Pascal Anfray & Tad M. Schmaltz - 2020 - Vivarium 58 (3):141-142.
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  42.  11
    The a to Z of Descartes and Cartesian Philosophy.Roger Ariew, Dennis Des Chene, Douglas M. Jesseph, Tad M. Schmaltz & Theo Verbeek - 2010 - Scarecrow Press.
    The A to Z of Descartes and Cartesian Philosophy includes a chronology, an introduction, a bibliography, and cross-reference dictionary entries Descartes's writings, concepts, and findings, as well as entries on those who supported him, those who criticized him, those who corrected him, and those who together formed one of the major movements in philosophy, Cartesianism.
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  43.  39
    The Problem of Universals in Early Modern Philosophy.Stefano Di Bella & Tad M. Schmaltz (eds.) - 2017 - New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    This is a collection of essays from an international group of scholars that explore the ways in which the ancient problem of universals was transformed in modern philosophy. Essays consider the various forms of "Platonism," "conceptualism" and "nominalism" in the writings of a broad range of modern thinkers.
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  44. Claude Clerselier and the development of Cartesianism.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2019 - In Steven Nadler, Tad M. Schmaltz & Delphine Antoine-Mahut (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Descartes and Cartesianism. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
     
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  45.  28
    Cartesian Truth (review).Tad M. Schmaltz - 1999 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (3):531-533.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Cartesian Truth by Thomas C. VinciTad M. SchmaltzThomas C. Vinci. Cartesian Truth. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998. Pp. xv + 270. Cloth, $45.00.The book jacket copy claims that Cartesian Truth merits “serious consideration by both contemporary analytic philosophers and postmodern thinkers.” Yet the work is written in a decidedly analytic idiom, and it is keyed primarily to recent analytic discussions of [End Page 531] epistemological foundationalism. Moreover, (...)
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  46.  14
    Edward Patrick Mahoney, 1932-2009.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2009 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 82 (5):204.
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  47.  23
    French Cartesian Scholasticism: Remarks on Descartes and the First Cartesians.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2018 - Perspectives on Science 26 (5):579-598.
    In a 1669 letter to his mentor Thomasius, Leibniz writes that "hardly any of the Cartesians have added anything to the discoveries of their master" insofar as they "have published only paraphrases of their leader."1 The book that is the focus of my remarks here—Roger Ariew's Descartes and the First Cartesians —shows that Leibniz was most certainly incorrect. In particular, Ariew draws attention to the fact that there was a concerted effort to present a new sort of Cartesianism that conforms (...)
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  48.  24
    From Causes to Laws.Tad M. Schmaltz - 2011 - In Desmond M. Clarke & Catherine Wilson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy in Early Modern Europe. Oxford University Press.
    This article examines the transition from causes to laws in research during the early modern period in Europe. It discusses Stillman Drake's claim that the search for causes of events in nature that guided science from the time of Aristotle was superseded at the dawn of modern science starting with the work of Galileo. However, there are complications for the suggestion that there was a process by which causes gave way to laws in science. This suggests that Drake's remark that (...)
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  49.  58
    Human freedom and divine creation in Malebranche, Descartes and the cartesians.Tad M. Schmaltz - 1994 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 2 (2):3 – 50.
  50.  96
    Malebranche on Descartes on mind-body distinctness.Tad M. Schmaltz - 1994 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (4):573-603.
    This article considers Descartes's famous claim that mind and body are distinct substances from the unusual perspective of Nicolas Malebranche. In particular, it focuses on Malebranche's argument that since Cartesians feel compelled to support such a claim by appealing to their clear idea of body, they must lack access to a clear idea of soul. The main conclusion is that while such an argument does not apply directly to Descartes's discussion in the "Meditations" of mind- body distinctness, this discussion nonetheless (...)
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