Results for 'Andrew D. Colgan'

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  1.  13
    The importance of philosophy in teacher education: mapping the decline and its consequences.Andrew D. Colgan & Bruce Maxwell (eds.) - 2020 - New York, NY: Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group.
    The Importance of Philosophy in Teacher Education maps the gradual decline of philosophy as a central, integrated part of educational studies. Chapters consider how this decline has impacted teacher education and practice, offering new directions for the reintegration of philosophical thinking in teacher preparation and development. Touching on key points in history, this valuable collection of chapters accurately appraises the global decline of philosophy of education in teacher education programs and seeks to understand the external and endemic causes of changed (...)
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  2. Embodied Cognition is Not What you Think it is.Andrew D. Wilson & Sabrina Golonka - 2013 - Frontiers in Psychology 4.
  3.  23
    Acknowledgements.Kent A. Peacock & Andrew D. Irvine - 2005 - In Kent A. Peacock & Andrew D. Irvine (eds.), Mistakes of reason: essays in honour of John Woods. Buffalo: University of Toronto Press.
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  4.  8
    Contributors.Kent A. Peacock & Andrew D. Irvine - 2005 - In Kent A. Peacock & Andrew D. Irvine (eds.), Mistakes of reason: essays in honour of John Woods. Buffalo: University of Toronto Press. pp. 511-516.
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  5.  7
    Contents.Kent A. Peacock & Andrew D. Irvine - 2005 - In Kent A. Peacock & Andrew D. Irvine (eds.), Mistakes of reason: essays in honour of John Woods. Buffalo: University of Toronto Press.
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  6.  5
    Frontmatter.Kent A. Peacock & Andrew D. Irvine - 2005 - In Kent A. Peacock & Andrew D. Irvine (eds.), Mistakes of reason: essays in honour of John Woods. Buffalo: University of Toronto Press.
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  7.  7
    Index.Kent A. Peacock & Andrew D. Irvine - 2005 - In Kent A. Peacock & Andrew D. Irvine (eds.), Mistakes of reason: essays in honour of John Woods. Buffalo: University of Toronto Press. pp. 521-533.
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  8.  10
    Preface.Kent A. Peacock & Andrew D. Irvine - 2005 - In Kent A. Peacock & Andrew D. Irvine (eds.), Mistakes of reason: essays in honour of John Woods. Buffalo: University of Toronto Press.
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  9.  61
    Epistemic dimensions of gaslighting: peer-disagreement, self-trust, and epistemic injustice.Andrew D. Spear - 2023 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 66 (1):68-91.
    ABSTRACT Miranda Fricker has characterized epistemic injustice as “a kind of injustice in which someone is wronged specifically in her capacity as a knower” (2007, Epistemic injustice: Power & the ethics of knowing. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 20). Gaslighting, where one agent seeks to gain control over another by undermining the other’s conception of herself as an independent locus of judgment and deliberation, would thus seem to be a paradigm example. Yet, in the most thorough analysis of gaslighting to date (...)
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  10. Functions in Basic Formal Ontology.Andrew D. Spear, Werner Ceusters & Barry Smith - 2016 - Applied ontology 11 (2):103-128.
    The notion of function is indispensable to our understanding of distinctions such as that between being broken and being in working order (for artifacts) and between being diseased and being healthy (for organisms). A clear account of the ontology of functions and functioning is thus an important desideratum for any top-level ontology intended for application to domains such as engineering or medicine. The benefit of using top-level ontologies in applied ontology can only be realized when each of the categories identified (...)
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  11. Epistemic dimensions of gaslighting: peer-disagreement, self-trust, and epistemic injustice.Andrew D. Spear - 2018 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 62:1-24.
    ABSTRACTMiranda Fricker has characterized epistemic injustice as “a kind of injustice in which someone is wronged specifically in her capacity as a knower” (2007, Epistemic injustice: Power & the e...
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  12. Gaslighting, Confabulation, and Epistemic Innocence.Andrew D. Spear - 2020 - Topoi 39 (1):229-241.
    Recent literature on epistemic innocence develops the idea that a defective cognitive process may nevertheless merit special consideration insofar as it confers an epistemic benefit that would not otherwise be available. For example, confabulation may be epistemically innocent when it makes a subject more likely to form future true beliefs or helps her maintain a coherent self-concept. I consider the role of confabulation in typical cases of interpersonal gaslighting, and argue that confabulation will not be epistemically innocent in such cases (...)
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  13. Counterfactual Similarity, Nomic Indiscernibility, and the Paradox of Quidditism.Andrew D. Bassford & C. Daniel Dolson - 2024 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 67 (1):230-261.
    Aristotle is essentially human; that is, for all possible worlds metaphysically consistent with our own, if Aristotle exists, then he is human. This is a claim about the essential property of an object. The claim that objects have essential properties has been hotly disputed, but for present purposes, we can bracket that issue. In this essay, we are interested, rather, in the question of whether properties themselves have essential properties (or features) for their existence. We call those who suppose they (...)
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  14.  27
    Gaslighting, Confabulation, and Epistemic Innocence.Andrew D. Spear - 2020 - Topoi 39 (1):229-241.
    Recent literature on epistemic innocence develops the idea that a defective cognitive process may nevertheless merit special consideration insofar as it confers an epistemic benefit that would not otherwise be available. For example, confabulation may be epistemically innocent when it makes a subject more likely to form future true beliefs or helps her maintain a coherent self-concept. I consider the role of confabulation in typical cases of interpersonal gaslighting, and argue that confabulation will not be epistemically innocent in such cases (...)
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  15.  22
    Self‐supporting Arguments.Andrew D. Cling - 2003 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (2):279-303.
    Deductive and inductive logic confront this skeptical challenge: we can justify any logical principle only by means of an argument but we can acquire justification by means of an argument only if we are already justified in believing some logical principle. We could solve this problem if probative arguments do not require justified belief in their corresponding conditionals. For if not, then inferential justification would not require justified belief in any logical principle. So even arguments whose corresponding conditionals are epistemically (...)
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  16.  10
    Toward a More Democratic Ethic of Technological Governance.Andrew D. Zimmerman - 1995 - Science, Technology and Human Values 20 (1):86-107.
    Recent scholarship in technology and society studies has given attention to the notion of technological citizenship. This article seeks to further integrate perspectives on this topic with theoretical contributions about the development of moral autonomy. The author challenges the presumption that the strategy of expanding opportunities for participation in technological decision making will in itself develop people's autonomy and citizenship. He argues that concurrent efforts must be made to democratize the political-economic structures of key technologies and to help people prepare (...)
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  17.  87
    Autonomy, liberalism and state neutrality.Andrew D. Mason - 1990 - Philosophical Quarterly 40 (161):433-452.
  18.  90
    Hertz, Boltzmann and Wittgenstein Reconsidered.Andrew D. Wilson - 1989 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 20 (2):245.
  19.  82
    The Revisionist Difference Principle.Andrew D. Williams - 1995 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):257 - 281.
    John Rawls's famous difference principle is capable of at least four distinct statements, each of which occurs in A Theory of Justice. According to what I shall term the Crude Principle it is a necessary and sufficient condition for the justice of an institutional scheme which expands social and economic inequality that, subject to the satisfaction of more weighty principles, it increases the level of advantage of the least advantaged. Expressing this principle Rawls writes that,Assuming the framework of institutions required (...)
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  20. When is informed consent required in cluster randomized trials in health research?Andrew D. McRae, Ariella Binik, Charles Weijer, Angela White, Jeremy M. Grimshaw, Robert Boruch, Jamie C. Brehaut, Allan Donner, Martin P. Eccles, Raphael Saginur, Merrick Zwarenstein & Monica Taljaard - 2011 - Trials 1 (12):202.
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  21.  12
    Interface Theory vs Gibson: An Ontological Defense of the Ecological Approach.Andrew D. Wilson - 2021 - Philosophical Psychology 34 (7):989-1010.
    Interface theory is the hypothesis that inferential, representational theories of perception entail that fitness, not truth, dictates the evolution of perceptual systems. They show, with simulations, that “veridical” perceptual mappings (ones that preserve at least some of the structure of the world) are routinely out-competed by “non-veridical” interfaces (ones that make no attempt to preserve that structure). They therefore take particular aim at the direct perception, ecological approach to perception and work to show that such a system, even if technically (...)
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  22. Extended Modal Realism — a New Solution to the Problem of Intentional Inexistence.Andrew D. Thomas - 2020 - Philosophia 48 (3):1197-1208.
    Kriegel described the problem of intentional inexistence as one of the ‘perennial problems of philosophy’, 307–340, 2007: 307). In the same paper, Kriegel alluded to a modal realist solution to the problem of intentional inexistence. However, Kriegel does not state by name who defends the kind of modal realist solution he has in mind. Kriegel also points out that even what he believes to be the strongest version of modal realism does not pass the ‘principle of representation’ and thus modal (...)
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  23. The epistemic regress problem.Andrew D. Cling - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 140 (3):401 - 421.
    The best extant statement of the epistemic regress problem makes assumptions that are too strong. An improved version assumes only that that reasons require support, that no proposition is supported only by endless regresses of reasons, and that some proposition is supported. These assumptions are individually plausible but jointly inconsistent. Attempts to explain support by means of unconceptualized sensations, contextually immunized propositions, endless regresses, and holistic coherence all require either additional reasons or an external condition on support that is arbitrary (...)
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  24. The trouble with infinitism.Andrew D. Cling - 2004 - Synthese 138 (1):101 - 123.
    One way to solve the epistemic regress problem would be to show that we can acquire justification by means of an infinite regress. This is infinitism. This view has not been popular, but Peter Klein has developed a sophisticated version of infinitism according to which all justified beliefs depend upon an infinite regress of reasons. Klein's argument for infinitism is unpersuasive, but he successfully responds to the most compelling extant objections to the view. A key component of his position is (...)
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  25. Lucas, Lewis, and mechanism -- one more time.Andrew D. Irvine - 1983 - Analysis 43 (March):94-98.
  26.  6
    Lucas, Lewis and Mechanism: One More Time.Andrew D. Irvine - 1983 - Analysis 43 (2):94.
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  27. Frege on Number Properties.Andrew D. Irvine - 2010 - Studia Logica 96 (2):239-260.
    In the Grundlagen , Frege offers eight main arguments, together with a series of more minor supporting arguments, against Mill’s view that numbers are “properties of external things”. This paper reviews all eight of these arguments, arguing that none are conclusive.
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  28. The Epistemic Regress Problem, the Problem of the Criterion, and the Value of Reasons.Andrew D. Cling - 2014 - Metaphilosophy 45 (2):161-171.
    There are important similarities between the epistemic regress problem and the problem of the criterion. Each turns on plausible principles stating that epistemic reasons must be supported by epistemic reasons but that having reasons is impossible if that requires having endless regresses of reasons. These principles are incompatible with the possibility of reasons, so each problem is a paradox. Whether there can be an antiskeptical solution to these paradoxes depends upon the kinds of reasons that we need in order to (...)
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  29. Justification-affording circular arguments.Andrew D. Cling - 2002 - Philosophical Studies 111 (3):251 - 275.
    An argument whose conclusion C is essential evidence for one of its premises can provide its target audience with justification for believing C. This is possible because we can enhance our justification for believing a proposition C by integrating it into an explanatory network of beliefs for which C itself provides essential evidence. I argue for this in light of relevant features of doxastic circularity, epistemic circularity, and explanatory inferences. Finally, I confirm my argument with an example and respond to (...)
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  30. Posing the problem of the criterion.Andrew D. Cling - 1994 - Philosophical Studies 75 (3):261 - 292.
    Although it has been largely neglected in contemporary philosophy , the problem of the criterion raises questions which must be addressed by any complete account of knowledge . But the problem of the criterion suffers not onl.
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  31. Who is the research subject in cluster randomized trials in health research?Andrew D. McRae, Ariella Binik, Charles Weijer, Jeremy M. Grimshaw, Monica Taljaard, Robert Boruch, Jamie C. Brehaut, Allan Donner, Martin P. Eccles, Antonio Gallo, Ray Saginur & Merrick Zwarenstein - 2011 - Trials 1 (12):118.
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  32.  11
    Protolanguage reconstructed.Andrew D. M. Smith - 2008 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 9 (1):100-116.
    One important difference between existing accounts of protolanguage lies in their assumptions on the semantic complexity of protolinguistic utterances. I bring evidence about the nature of linguistic communication to bear on the plausibility of these assumptions, and show that communication is fundamentally inferential and characterised by semantic uncertainty. This not only allows individuals to maintain variation in linguistic representation, but also imposes a selection pressure that meanings be reconstructible from context. I argue that protolanguage utterances had varying degrees of semantic (...)
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  33.  4
    Bonhoeffer’s New Beginning: Ethics After Devastation.Andrew D. DeCort - 2018 - Lanham, MD: Fortress Academic.
    Bonhoeffer’s New Beginning investigates Dietrich Bonhoeffer's life-affirming answer to how we begin again after devastation. Combining scholarly rigor and existential honesty, DeCort argues that Bonhoeffer offers an ethical and moral vision of radical hope vis-à-vis the perceived absence of God in the face of devastation.
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  34.  7
    Issues in the assessment of L2 pragmatics.Andrew D. Cohen - 2020 - Lodz Papers in Pragmatics 16 (1):15-31.
    This paper highlights areas of concern in the assessment of pragmatics, with the intent of stimulating fresh thinking about the assessment of pragmatics both for research purposes and as a part of classroom instruction. It starts by considering what aspects of ability in pragmatics to assess, and then contrasts the trade-off between the feasibility of obtaining data and the ultimate importance of the data. Next, the conspicuous lack of assessment of ability in L2 pragmatics in language classes is noted. Then (...)
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  35.  21
    Lessons from Everyday Lives: A Moral Justification for Acute Care Research.Andrew D. McRae & Charles Weijer - unknown
    Progress in emergency and critical care requires that clinical research be performed on patients who are incapable of granting consent for research participation. Analyses of the ethics of such research have left some questions incompletely answered. Why should we be permitted to expose vulnerable patients to research risks without their consent? In particular, how do we justify research interventions that have no potential benefit for participants (nontherapeutic interventions)? This article presents a moral justification for nontherapeutic interventions in emergency research. By (...)
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  36.  48
    Harmonizing Leibniz’s Ontology.Andrew D. H. Stumpf - 2012 - Dialogue 51 (3):467-483.
    I propose a novel compatibilist interpretation of Leibniz’s mature views concerning what is metaphysically basic. Drawing on a compatibilist reading of Aristotle on primary substance in the Categories and Metaphysics Z, I argue that Leibniz is working with two complementary ways of being metaphysically basic—one applying to immaterial monads, the other to corporeal substances. Although corporeal substances derive their status as basic from their dominant monads, they are nevertheless fully real, unified, and genuinely capable of acting. This perspective respects Leibniz’s (...)
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  37.  23
    Harmonizing Leibniz’s Ontology.Andrew D. H. Stumpf - 2012 - Dialogue 51 (3):467-483.
    I propose a novel compatibilist interpretation of Leibniz’s mature views concerning what is metaphysically basic. Drawing on a compatibilist reading of Aristotle on primary substance in the Categories and Metaphysics Z, I argue that Leibniz is working with two complementary ways of being metaphysically basic—one applying to immaterial monads, the other to corporeal substances. Although corporeal substances derive their status as basic from their dominant monads, they are nevertheless fully real, unified, and genuinely capable of acting. This perspective respects Leibniz’s (...)
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  38. Transnational macro-narrative descendancy in violent conflict: a case study of the Mujahidin Indonesia Timur in central Sulawesi.Andrew D. Henshaw - unknown
    This thesis investigates transnational macro-narrative decendancy in violent conflicts and identifies enabling dynamics that facilitate re-framing. To date there has been little focus on processes involved, explicitly narrative descendancy, bridging, resonance building, or grafting, representing a critical knowledge gap. -/- This thesis reviews relevant literature on constructivism and rational choice theory and tests the findings against an empirical case study in Central Sulawesi. The findings demonstrate a mixture of approaches is present, though this is likely due to a range of (...)
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  39. Global health ethics for students.Andrew D. Pinto & Ross E. G. Upshur - 2007 - Developing World Bioethics 9 (1):1-10.
    As a result of increased interest in global health, more and more medical students and trainees from the.
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  40.  19
    Commentary: Oversight of Engineered Nanomaterials in the Workplace.Andrew D. Maynard - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (4):651-658.
    Research and business investment in emerging nanotechnologies is leading to a diverse range of new substances and products. As workers are faced with handling new materials, often with novel properties, the robustness of current workplace health and safety regulatory frameworks is being brought into question. Here, 12 characteristics of the U.S. occupational safety regulatory framework identified by Choi and Ramachandran are considered in the context of emerging nanotechnologies. The assessment suggests that, as the number of new materials entering the workplace (...)
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  41.  14
    Commentary: Oversight of Engineered Nanomaterials in the Workplace.Andrew D. Maynard - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (4):651-658.
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  42.  10
    Theology, Fantasy, and the Imagination.Andrew D. Thrasher & Austin M. Freeman (eds.) - 2023 - Fortress Academic.
    Theology, Fantasy, and the Imagination analyzes theological, religious, and philosophical themes in classical Christian fantasy, contemporary “post-Christian” fantasy, and fantasy at play in table top games such as Dungeons and Dragons and Magic: the Gathering.
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  43.  13
    The Cannabis Experience.Andrew D. Hathaway & Justin Sharpley - 2010-09-24 - In Fritz Allhoff & Dale Jacquette (eds.), Cannabis Philosophy for Everyone. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 50–61.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction Investigating Consciousness and Consciousness Expansion The Cannabis Experience.
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  44.  50
    Ideas: General Introduction to Pure Phenomenology. [REVIEW]Andrew D. Osborn - 1932 - Journal of Philosophy 29 (6):163-167.
  45.  1
    Erasmus, More, and the Shape of Persuasion.Andrew D. Weiner - 1980 - Moreana 17 (Number 65-17 (1-2):87-98.
  46.  16
    Remediation.Andrew D. Harding & Mark W. Connolly - 2012 - Jona’s Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 14 (2):48-52.
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  47.  11
    TRAC: Developing Counterintelligence for Strategic Application into the Counter-Terrorism Space.Andrew D. Henshaw - 2014 - Intelligence Analysis.
    SummaryThe practice of counterintelligence traditionally lies in its application to the function of catching spies, stopping espionage and protecting national security and the national interest. More recently though counterintelligence has matured and is frequently being deployed into fields such as counter-terrorism, however it still remains that counterintelligence is often poorly understood, and the practice of counterintelligence operations in the counter-terrorism space presents new challenges as well as conflicts of purpose with the contemporary partners of intelligence and security services such as (...)
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  48.  16
    Towards a behavioural ecology of obesity.Andrew D. Higginson, John M. McNamara & Sasha R. X. Dall - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  49. Epistemic levels and the problem of the criterion.Andrew D. Cling - 1997 - Philosophical Studies 88 (2):109-140.
    The problem of the criterion says that we can know a proposition only if we first know a criterion of truth and vice versa, hence, we cannot know any proposition or any criterion of truth. The epistemic levels response says that since knowledge does not require knowledge about knowledge, we can know a proposition without knowing a criterion of truth. This response (advocated by Chisholm and Van Cleve) presupposes that criteria of truth are epistemic principles. In general, however, criteria of (...)
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  50. Eliminative materialism and self-referential inconsistency.Andrew D. Cling - 1989 - Philosophical Studies 56 (May):53-75.
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