Results for 'neurophilosophy'

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  1. Neurophilosophy: Toward A Unified Science of the Mind-Brain.Patricia Smith Churchland - 1986 - MIT Press.
    This is a unique book. It is excellently written, crammed with information, wise and a pleasure to read.' ---Daniel C. Dennett, Tufts University.
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  2.  51
    Neurophilosophy: Toward a Unified Science of the Mind/Brain.Christopher S. Hill & Patricia Smith Churchland - 1988 - Philosophical Review 97 (4):573.
  3. Neurophilosophy of Free Will: From Libertarian Illusions to a Concept of Natural Autonomy.Henrik Walter - 2001 - MIT Press.
    Walter applies the methodology of neurophilosophy to one of philosophy's centralchallenges, the notion of free will. Neurophilosophical conclusions are based on, and consistentwith, scientific knowledge about the brain and its functioning.
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  4. Neurophilosophy at Work.Paul Churchland - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Churchland explores the unfolding impact of the several empirical sciences of the mind, especially cognitive neurobiology and computational neuroscience on a variety of traditional issues central to the discipline of philosophy. Representing Churchland's most recent research, they continue his research program, launched over thirty years ago which has evolved into the field of neurophilosophy. Topics such as the nature of Consciousness, the nature of cognition and intelligence, the nature of moral knowledge and moral reasoning, neurosemantics or world-representation in the (...)
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  5. Neurophilosophy of Free Will.Henrik Walter - 2002 - In Robert H. Kane (ed.), The Oxford Handbook on Free Will. Oxford University Press.
  6. The Neurophilosophy of Consciousness.Pete Mandik - 2007 - In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell. pp. 418--430.
    The neurophilosophy of consciousness brings neuroscience to bear on philosophical issues concerning phenomenal consciousness, especially issues concerning what makes mental states conscious, what it is that we are conscious of, and the nature of the phenomenal character of conscious states. Here attention is given largely to phenomenal consciousness as it arises in vision. The relevant neuroscience concerns not only neurophysiological and neuroanatomical data, but also computational models of neural networks. The neurophilosophical theories that bring such data to bear on (...)
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  7. Neurophilosophy: Toward a Unified Theory of the Mind/Brain.Kathleen A. Akins - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy 87 (2):93-102.
  8. Neurophilosophy and Neurophenomenology.Shaun Gallagher - 2007 - Phenomenology 2005.
    I consider two specific issues to show the difference between a neurophilosophical approach and a neurophenomenlogical approach, namely, the issues of self and intersubjectivity. Neurophilosophy (which starts with theory that is continuous with common sense) and neurophenomenology (which generates theory in methodically controlled practices) lead to very different philosophical views on these issues.
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  9. Strong Neurophilosophy and the Matter of Bat Consciousness: A Case Study.Sean Allen-Hermanson - 2015 - Erkenntnis 80 (1):57-76.
    In “What is it like to be boring and myopic?” Kathleen Akins offers an interesting, empirically driven, argument for thinking that there is nothing that it is like to be a bat. She suggests that bats are “boring” in the sense that they are governed by behavioral scripts and simple, non-representational, control loops, and are best characterized as biological automatons. Her approach has been well received by philosophers sympathetic to empirically informed philosophy of mind. But, despite its influence, her work (...)
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  10.  1
    Pragmatist Neurophilosophy: American Philosophy and the Brain.John R. Shook & Tibor Solymosi (eds.) - 2014 - Bloomsbury Academic.
    A comprehensive exploration of pragmatic themes emerging from neuroscientific research,illustrating why neurophilosophy should take this advancing pragmatist direction seriously.
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  11.  13
    Neurophilosophy Meets Psychology: Reduction, Autonomy, and Empirical Constraints.Gary Hatfield - 1988 - Cognitive Neuropsychology 5:723-46.
    A commentary on Neurophilosophy: Toward a unified science of the mind/brain, by Patricia Smith Churchland. Cambridge, Mass.: The M.I.T. Press/Bradford, 1986, pp. xi + 546, $27.50, ISBN 0-262-03116-7.
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  12.  18
    Neurophilosophy at Work.Paul Churchland - 2009 - Analysis 69 (1):176-178.
    This is a collection of Paul Churchland's recent essays which have in common an overarching research programme aimed at identifying the scope and the importance of the contributions that neuroscience has made and will make to philosophy of mind, moral philosophy, epistemology and metaphysics. The general structure of many of the essays included in the collection is as follows: there is a long-standing problem in the philosophical literature which has escaped not only a convincing solution but also a straightforward analysis (...)
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  13. The Neurophilosophy of Subjectivity.Pete Mandik - 2009 - In John Bickle (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Neuroscience. Oxford University Press.
    The so-called subjectivity of conscious experience is central to much recent work in the philosophy of mind. Subjectivity is the alleged property of consciousness whereby one can know what it is like to have certain conscious states only if one has undergone such states oneself. I review neurophilosophical work on consciousness and concepts pertinent to this claim and argue that subjectivity eliminativism is at least as well supported, if not more supported, than subjectivity reductionism.
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  14.  90
    Buddhism, Comparative Neurophilosophy, and Human Flourishing.Christian Coseru - 2014 - Zygon 49 (1):208-219.
    Owen Flanagan's The Bodhisattva's Brain represents an ambitious foray into cross-cultural neurophilosophy, making a compelling, though not entirely unproblematic, case for naturalizing Buddhist philosophy. While the naturalist account of mental causation challenges certain Buddhist views about the mind, the Buddhist analysis of mind and mental phenomena is far more complex than the book suggests. Flanagan is right to criticize the Buddhist claim that there could be mental states that are not reducible to their neural correlates; however, when the mental (...)
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  15. Neurophilosophie der Willensfreiheit von Libertarischen Illusionen Zum Konzept Natürlicher Autonomie.Henrik Walter - 1999
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  16. Brain-Wise: Studies in Neurophilosophy.Patricia Smith Churchland - 2002 - MIT Press.
    A neurophilosopher?s take on the self, free will, human understanding, and the experience of God, from the perspective of the brain.
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  17.  50
    Neurophilosophy of Moral Responsibility: The Case for Revisionist Compatibilism.Henrik Walter - 2004 - Philosophical Topics 32 (1/2):477-503.
  18.  73
    Neurophilosophy and Its Discontents.Gabrielle Jackson - 2014 - The Institute Letter 2014 (Summer):5-6.
  19. Neurophilosophy: A Principled Skeptic's Response.Geoffrey C. Madell - 1986 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 29 (June):153-168.
  20. Neurophilosophy at Work • by Paul Churchland. [REVIEW]Lisa Bortolotti - 2009 - Analysis 69 (1):176-178.
    This is a collection of Paul Churchland's recent essays which have in common an overarching research programme aimed at identifying the scope and the importance of the contributions that neuroscience has made and will make to philosophy of mind, moral philosophy, epistemology and metaphysics. The general structure of many of the essays included in the collection is as follows: there is a long-standing problem in the philosophical literature which has escaped not only a convincing solution but also a straightforward analysis (...)
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  21.  73
    The Neurophilosophy of Pain.Grant R. Gillett - 1991 - Philosophy 66 (April):191-206.
    The ability to feel pain is a property of human beings that seems to be based entirely in our biological natures and to place us squarely within the animal kingdom. Yet the experience of pain is often used as an example of a mental attribute with qualitative properties that defeat attempts to identify mental events with physiological mechanisms. I will argue that neurophysiology and psychology help to explain the interwoven biological and subjective features of pain and recommend a view of (...)
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  22.  96
    What is Neurophilosophy? A Methodological Account.Georg Northoff - 2004 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 35 (1):91-127.
    The term ``neurophilosophy'' is often used either implicitly or explicitly for characterizing the investigation of philosophical theories in relation to neuroscientific hypotheses. The exact methodological principles and systematic rules for a linkage between philosophical theories and neuroscientific hypothesis, however, remain to be clarified. The present contribution focuses on these principles, as well as on the relation between ontology and epistemology and the characterization of hypothesis in neurophilosophy. Principles of transdisciplinary methodology include the `principle of asymmetry', the `principle of (...)
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  23. Neurophilosophy at Work: Philosophical Morals of Neurological Defects.Živan Lazović - 2009 - Theoria: Beograd 52 (1):115-126.
     
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  24.  7
    La Neurophilosophie Et la Question de L'Être: Les Neurosciences Et le Déclin Métaphysique de la Pensée.Christian Poirel - 2008 - Harmattan.
    Situé à la croisée des sciences humaines et de la recherche neurobiologique, cet essai entend dépasser les clivages conceptuels.
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  25.  7
    Neurophilosophy of Free Will: From Libertarian Illusions to a Concept of Natural Autonomy by Henrik Walter.Kristin Andrews - 2003 - Philo 6 (1):166-175.
  26. Neurophilosophy: The Early Years and New Directions.P. S. Churchland - 2007 - Functional Neurology 22.
     
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  27. Brain-wise. Studies in Neurophilosophy.Patricia Smith Churchland - 2002 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 66 (4):767-768.
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  28.  16
    The Neurophilosophy of Pain: G. R. Gillett.G. R. Gillett - 1991 - Philosophy 66 (256):191-206.
    The ability to feel pain is a property of human beings that seems to be based entirely in our biological natures and to place us squarely within the animal kingdom. Yet the experience of pain is often used as an example of a mental attribute with qualitative properties that defeat attempts to identify mental events with physiological mechanisms. I will argue that neurophysiology and psychology help to explain the interwoven biological and subjective features of pain and recommend a view of (...)
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  29.  90
    Neurophilosophy.A. C. Grayling - 2010 - The Philosophers' Magazine 50 (50):54-55.
  30.  14
    Neurophilosophy: Toward a Unified Science of the Mind-BrainPatricia Smith Churchland.Edward Manier - 1987 - Isis 78 (3):436-437.
  31.  15
    Neurophilosophy: Toward a Unified Science of the Mind-Brain by Patricia Smith Churchland. [REVIEW]Edward Manier - 1987 - Isis 78:436-437.
  32. Neurophilosophie der Willensfreiheit. Von libertarischen Illusionen zum Konzept natürlicher Autonomie. [REVIEW]Rimas Cuplinskas - 2001 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 55 (3).
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  33. Neuroscience, Neurophilosophy and Pragmatism: Understanding Brains at Work in the World.Tibor Solymosi & John Shook (eds.) - 2014 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
     
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  34. Neurophilosophy of Free Will by Henrik Walter.Kristin Andrews - 2003 - Philo 6 (1):166-175.
  35.  10
    Neurophilosophy.A. C. Grayling - 2010 - The Philosophers' Magazine 50:54-55.
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  36.  38
    Neurophilosophy of Number.Hourya Benis Sinaceur - 2017 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 31 (1):1-25.
    Neurosciences and cognitive sciences provide us with myriad empirical findings that shed light on hypothesised primitive numerical processes in the brain and in the mind. Yet, the hypotheses on which the experiments are based, and hence the results, depend strongly on sophisticated abstract models used to describe and explain neural data or cognitive representations that supposedly are the empirical roots of primary arithmetical activity. I will question the foundational role of such models. I will even cast doubt upon the search (...)
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  37.  35
    What is Neurophilosophy: Do We Need a Non-Reductive Form?Philipp Klar - 2020 - Synthese 199 (1-2):2701-2725.
    Neurophilosophy is a controversial scientific discipline lacking a broadly accepted definition and especially a well-elaborated methodology. Views about what neurophilosophy entails and how it can combine neuroscience with philosophy, as in their branches and methodologies, diverge widely. This article, first of all, presents a brief insight into the naturalization of philosophy regarding neurophilosophy and three resulting distinguishable forms of how neuroscience and philosophy may or may not be connected in part 1, namely reductive neurophilosophy, the parallelism (...)
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  38.  27
    Neuroscience, Neurophilosophy, and Pragmatism: Brains at Work with the World Ed. By Tibor Solymosi & John R. Shook.José Filipe Silva & Kimmo Alho - 2015 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 51 (3):389-393.
    The general aim of this very welcome volume is to explore the relation between pragmatism and neuroscience. The thirteen chapters are evenly divided into four parts, roughly organized around the themes of brain and pragmatism, emotion and cognition, creativity and education, and ethics.The beginning chapter written by the editors attempts to show that advances in behavioral and brain sciences intersect core theses of pragmatism with regards to cognition and the mind-world relation. The basic assumption is that neuroscience and pragmatism share (...)
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  39.  6
    Neurophilosophy As The Route to A Unified Theory of The Mind-Brain.Stephen Mills - 1987 - Irish Philosophical Journal 4 (1-2):161-175.
  40.  6
    The Anthropologization of Dasein-Psyche’s Being by Methods of Neurophilosophy.O. A. Bazaluk - 2020 - Anthropological Measurements of Philosophical Research 18:7-19.
    The purpose of the article is to reveal the anthropologization of Dasein-psyche’s being by methods of neurophilosophy. The anthropologization of Dasein-psyche’s being by methods of neurophilosophy allows considering the noogenesis from the perspective of philosophical traditions, which is much richer in comparison with the history of scientific knowledge about the psychology of meanings. The being of Dasein-psyche in the meaning of "philosopher’s soul" was firstly mentioned by Plato in "Phaedo". The anthropologization of Dasein-psyche’s being reveals the ontological orientation (...)
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  41.  20
    Neurophilosophy: Toward a Unified Science of the Mind‐Brain.Grant Gillett - 1987 - Philosophical Books 28 (4):233-236.
  42. Neurophilosophy: Toward a Unified Science of the Mind-Brain - Patricia S. Churchland. [REVIEW]Silvano Caiani - 2008 - Humana Mente 2 (5).
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  43.  4
    Neurophilosophy and Alzheimer's Disease.Y. Christen & P. S. Churchland (eds.) - 1992 - Springer Verlag.
  44.  6
    Sport, Ethics, and Neurophilosophy.Jeffrey P. Fry & Mike McNamee - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (3):259-263.
    The influence of neuroscience looms large today. In this introductory essay, we provide some context for the volume by acknowledging the expansion of applied neuroscience to everyday life and the proliferation of neuroscientific disciplines. We also observe that some individuals have sounded cautionary notes in light of perceived overreach of some claims for neuroscience. Then we briefly summarize the articles that comprise this volume. This diverse collection of papers represents the beginning of a conversation focused on the intersection of sport, (...)
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  45.  21
    Introduction: Neurophilosophy and Alzheimer's Disease.P. S. Churchland - 1992 - In Y. Christen & P. S. Churchland (eds.), Neurophilosophy and Alzheimer's Disease. Springer Verlag. pp. 1--4.
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  46.  55
    The Poverty of Neurophilosophy.Gunther S. Stent - 1990 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (5):539-557.
    The monist approach to the ancient mind-body problem styled "neurophilosophy" put forward recently by Patricia Smith Churchland on the basis of latter-day advances in the neurosciences is philosophically inadequate because it does not deal with the ethical dimension of the mind. Keywords: brain, complementarity, free will, mind-body problem, neuroscience, reductionism CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us What's this?
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  47.  70
    Review of Neurophilosophy of Free Will: From Libertarian Illusions to a Concept of Natural Autonomy, Henrik Walter. [REVIEW]Kristin Andrews - 2001 - Philo 6 (1):166-175.
    The question of whether humans have free will, like the question of the meaning of life, is one whose answer depends on how the question itself is interpreted. In his recent book Neurophilosophy of Free Will: From Libertarian Illusions to a Concept of Natural Autonomy, Henrik Walter examines whether free will is possible in a deterministic natural world, and he concludes that the answer is "It depends" (xi). He rejects a libertarian account of free will as internally inconsistent, but (...)
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  48.  52
    Paul Churchland, Neurophilosophy at Work (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007), 249 Pp. [REVIEW]Janez Bregant - 2011 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 11 (1 (31)):128-132.
  49.  58
    From Sensory Neuroscience to Neurophilosophy: Reflections on Llinas and Churchland's Mind-Brain Continuum.John Bickle - 1997 - Philosophical Psychology 10 (4):523-530.
    Philosophers and psychologists seeking an accessible introduction to current neuroscience will find much value in this volume. Befitting the neuroscientific focus on sensory processes, many essays address explicitly the binding problem. Theoretical and experimental work pertaining to the “temporal synchronicity” solution is prominent. But there are also some surprising implications for current philosophical concerns, such as the intemalism/extemalism debate about representational content, epistemological realism, a “bottom-up” approach to naturalizing intentionality, Humean concerns about the self, and implications from phantom-limb phenomena. Higher-level (...)
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  50. Paul Churchland, Neurophilosophy at Work. [REVIEW]Andrew Fenton - 2008 - Philosophy in Review 28 (5):324-326.
     
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