87 found
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  1. The art instinct: beauty, pleasure, & human evolution.Denis Dutton - 2009 - New York: Bloomsbury Press.
    Introduction -- Landscape and longing -- Art and human nature -- What is art? -- But they don't have our concept of art -- Art and natural selection -- The uses of fiction -- Art and human self-domestication -- Intention, forgery, dada : three aesthetic problems -- The contingency of aesthetic values -- Greatness in the arts.
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  2.  8
    The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution.Denis Dutton - 2009 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    The need to create art is found in every human society, manifest in many different ways across many different cultures. Is this universal need rooted in our evolutionary past? The Art Instinct reveals that it is, combining evolutionary psychology with aesthetics to shed new light on fascinating questions about the nature of art.
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  3.  79
    The Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure, and Human Evolution.Denis Dutton - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    The need to create art is found in every human society, manifest in many different ways across many different cultures. Is this universal need rooted in our evolutionary past? The Art Instinct reveals that it is, combining evolutionary psychology with aesthetics to shed new light on fascinating questions about the nature of art.
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  4. Artistic crimes: The problem of forgery in the arts.Denis Dutton - 1979 - British Journal of Aesthetics 19 (4):302-314.
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  5. A naturalist definition of art.Denis Dutton - 2006 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (3):367–377.
    Aesthetic theoriesmayclaim universality, but they are normally conditioned by the aesthetic issues and debates of their own times. Plato and Aristo- tle were motivated both to account for the Greek arts of their day and to connect aesthetics to their general metaphysics and theories of value. Closer to our time, asNo¨el Carroll observes, the theories of Clive Bell and R.G. Collingwood can be viewed as “defenses of emerging avant-garde practices— neoimpressionism, on the one hand, and the mod- ernist poetics of (...)
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  6. Authenticity in art.Denis Dutton - 2003 - In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics. Oxford University Press. pp. 258--274.
     
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  7. Artistic crimes.Denis Dutton - manuscript
    The concept of forgery is a touchstone of criticism. If the existence of forgeries — and their occasional acceptance as authentic works of art — has been too often dismissed or ignored in the theory of criticism, it may be because of the forger’s special power to make the critic look ridiculous. Awkward as it is, critics have heaped the most lavish praise on art objects that have turned out to be forged. The suspicion this arouses is, of course, that (...)
     
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  8. Aesthetics and Evolutionary Psychology.Denis Dutton - 2003 - In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics. Oxford University Press.
  9.  12
    A Naturalist Definition of Art.Denis Dutton - 2006 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (3):367-377.
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  10.  38
    The Idea of Creativity.Karen Bardsley, Denis Dutton & Michael Krausz (eds.) - 2009 - Brill.
    Seventeen philosophical thinkers ask: What is creativity? What are the criteria of creativity? Should we assign logical priority to creative persons, processes, or products? How do various forms of creativity relate to different domains of human activity?
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  11.  53
    Tribal art and artifact.Denis Dutton - 1993 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (1):13-21.
    Europeans seeking to understand tribal arts face obvious problems of comprehending the histories, values, and ideas of vastly remote cultures. In this respect the issues faced in understanding tribal art (or folk art, primitive art, traditional art, third or fourth-world art — none of these designations is ideal) are not much different from those encountered in trying to comprehend the distant art of “our own” culture, for instance, the art of medieval Europe. But in the case of tribal or so-called (...)
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  12. Aesthetic universals.Denis Dutton - 2000 - In Berys Nigel Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge. pp. 203--214.
  13.  99
    Kant and the conditions of artistic beauty.Denis Dutton - 1994 - British Journal of Aesthetics 34 (3):226-239.
  14. Art Hoaxes.Denis Dutton - unknown
    As much as many other human enterprises, the art world today is fuelled by pride, greed, and ambition. Artists and art dealers hope for recognition and wealth, while art collectors often acquire works less for their intrinsic aesthetic merit than for their investment potential. In such a climate of values and desires, it is not surprising that poseurs and frauds will flourish. For works of painting and sculpture are material objects that derive their often immense monetary value generally from two (...)
     
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  15. Mythologies of Tribal Art.Denis Dutton - unknown
    Forty years ago Roland Barthes defined a mythology as those “falsely obvious” ideas which an age so takes for granted that it is unaware of its own belief. An illustration of what he meant can be seen in his 1957 critique of the photographic exhibition, The Family of Man . Barthes declares that the myth it promotes stresses exoticism, complacently projecting a Babel of human diversity over the globe. From this image of diversity a pluralistic humanism “is magically produced: man (...)
     
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  16.  30
    To understand it on its own terms.Denis Dutton - 1974 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 35 (2):246-256.
    We commonly hear it said that a work of art must be understood “on its own terms,” and that phrase is used in other contexts as well; people, especially people very different from ourselves, are said to have to be understood on their own terms. But what is the meaning of the expression “on its/their own terms?” Note that we do not say of every possible object of understanding that it must be understood on its own terms. The statement, “Chemistry (...)
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  17.  34
    Art and Sexual Selection.Denis Dutton - 2000 - Philosophy and Literature 24 (2):512-521.
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  18.  46
    Plausibility and Aesthetic Interpretation.Denis Dutton - 1977 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):327 - 340.
    If a catalogue were made of terms commonly used to affirm the adequacy of critical interpretations of works of art, one word certain to be included would be “plausible.” Yet this term is one which has received precious little attention in the literature of aesthetics. This is odd, inasmuch as I find the notion of plausibility central to an understanding of the nature of criticism. “Plausible” is a perplexing term because it can have radically different meanings depending on the circumstances (...)
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  19. Why intentionalism won't go away.Denis Dutton - manuscript
    Considering the philosophic intelligence that has set out to discredit it, intentionalism in critical interpretation has shown an uncanny resilience. Beginning perhaps most explicitly with the New Criticism, continuing through the analytic tradition in philosophy, and culminating most recently in deconstructionism, philosophers and literary theorists have kept under sustained attack the notion that authorial intention can provide a guide to interpretation, a criterion of textual meaning, or a standard for the validation of criticism. Yet intentionalist criticism still has avid theoretical (...)
     
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  20.  8
    The Concept of creativity in science and art.Denis Dutton & Michael Krausz (eds.) - 1981 - Hingham, MA: Distributors for the U.S. and Canada, Kluwer Boston.
  21.  11
    The Forger's Art: Forgery and the Philosophy of Art.Denis Dutton - 1983 - University of California Press, C1983.
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  22.  64
    The Pleasures of Fiction.Denis Dutton - 2004 - Philosophy and Literature 28 (2):453-466.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Pleasures of FictionDenis DuttonHuman Beings Expend staggering amounts of time and resources on creating and experiencing art and entertainment—music, dancing, and static visual arts. Of all of the arts, however, it is the category of fictional story-telling that across the globe today is the most intense focus of what amounts to a virtual human addiction. A recent government study in Britain showed that if you add together annual (...)
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  23.  49
    A Darwinian Theory of Beauty.Denis Dutton - 2014 - Philosophy and Literature 38 (1A):A314-A318.
  24.  3
    Astrology, Computers, and the Volksgeist.Denis Dutton - 1995 - Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):424-434.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Astrology, Computers, and the VolksgeistDenis DuttonCarroll Righter is not a name you will recognize, unless, perhaps, you’re old enough and you grew up reading the Los Angeles Times. Righter was the Times’s astrologer, and encountering his name recently brought back a couple of memories from the early 1950s. I remember finding it strange that a man (he was pictured alongside his column) was called Carroll, though he didn’t spell (...)
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  25. Why Intentionalism Won't Go Away.Anthony J. Cascardi & Denis Dutton - unknown
    Considering the philosophic intelligence that has set out to discredit it, intentionalism in critical interpretation has shown an uncanny resilience. Beginning perhaps most explicitly with the New Criticism, continuing through the analytic tradition in philosophy, and culminating most recently in deconstructionism, philosophers and literary theorists have kept under sustained attack the notion that authorial intention can provide a guide to interpretation, a criterion of textual meaning, or a standard for the validation of criticism. Yet intentionalist criticism still has avid theoretical (...)
     
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  26.  22
    Astrology, Computers, and the Volksgeist.Denis Dutton - 1995 - Philosophy and Literature 19 (2):424-434.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Astrology, Computers, and the VolksgeistDenis DuttonCarroll Righter is not a name you will recognize, unless, perhaps, you’re old enough and you grew up reading the Los Angeles Times. Righter was the Times’s astrologer, and encountering his name recently brought back a couple of memories from the early 1950s. I remember finding it strange that a man (he was pictured alongside his column) was called Carroll, though he didn’t spell (...)
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  27.  28
    A Hanging Judge.Denis Dutton - 2002 - Philosophy and Literature 26 (1):224-238.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Philosophy and Literature 26.1 (2002) 224-238 [Access article in PDF] Bookmarks A Hanging Judge Denis Dutton "CORNERING THE MARKET ON CHUTZPAH," blared the headline on one review, and in tone it wasn't alone. It's not often that a book by a public intellectual has received as much media attention—mostly vilification and scorn—as Richard A. Posner's Public Intellectuals: A Study of Decline (Harvard University Press, $29.95). Three reasons for this (...)
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  28.  17
    Art of the Piano.Denis Dutton - 2003 - Philosophy and Literature 27 (2):485-494.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Philosophy and Literature 27.2 (2003) 485-494 [Access article in PDF] Art of the Piano Denis Dutton CHARLES ROSEN is so familiar to readers as an acute music theorist and historian of European ideas and literature that it is easy to forget that he is one of most stimulating and compelling pianists of the last fifty years. In Piano Notes: The World of the Pianist (Free Press, $25.00), he combines (...)
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  29.  5
    Erratum.Denis Dutton - 2003 - Philosophy and Literature 27 (1):241-254.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Philosophy and Literature 27.1 (2003) 241-254 [Access article in PDF] Darwin and Political Theory Denis Dutton [Erratum]IN THE 1970s, during the oil crisis, B. F. Skinner suggested a way that the United States's energy shortage could be alleviated. People should be rewarded, he argued, for coming together to eat in large communal dining halls, rather than cooking and eating at home with their families. His reasoning was irresistible: large (...)
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  30.  7
    Heavy traffic.Denis Dutton - 1996 - Philosophy and Literature 20 (1):283-297.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Heavy TrafficDenis DuttonIt was the Reverend Sidney Smith who said, “I never read a book before reviewing it; it prejudices a man so.” Thirty years ago that remark was still a joke. These days, it’s a downright plausible idea, one with a distinctly postmodern ring. If the objects of experience are nothing but constructions, inventions of our cultures and mind-sets, that must go as well for all the books (...)
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  31.  15
    Review Essay: Guidelines for Bias-Free Writing.Denis Dutton - 1996 - Philosophy and Literature 20 (2):551-566.
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  32.  31
    The empire writes back, with a vengeance.Denis Dutton - 1995 - Philosophy and Literature 19 (1):198-205.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:The Empire Writes Back, With A VengeanceDenis DuttonOne of the more uplifting aspects of the turn toward theory in recent years has been the growth of postcolonial cultural studies. Postcolonial studies are in actuality constituted by counterdiscoursive, decolonizing practices which acknowledge the recognition of minority discourses, deconstructing hegemonic texts and imperialist metanarratives, opposing unduly overprivileging Western canonical paradigms of “literature,” and—well, you know what I mean. As Benita Parry (...)
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  33.  43
    What is Genius?Denis Dutton - 2001 - Philosophy and Literature 25 (1):181-196.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Philosophy and Literature 25.1 (2001) 181-196 [Access article in PDF] Bookmarks What is Genius? Denis Dutton There's a school of thought which holds that there's nothing much of interest that can be said about genius. The root idea is older than Kant, but it was well summarized by him: genius is a natural endowment, deep, strange, and mysterious, at least with respect to putative explanations. Schubert can get up (...)
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  34.  9
    War of the Worldviews.Denis Dutton & Garry Hagberg - 2002 - Philosophy and Literature 26 (1):iii-iv.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Philosophy and Literature 26.1 (2002) iii-iv [Access article in PDF] Editorial War of the Worldviews With this issue, PHILOSOPHY AND LITERATURE enters its second quarter century. For many of the past twenty-five years it has enjoyed the sponsorship of Whitman College and the extraordinarily capable coeditorship of Patrick Henry. Bard College now assumes sponsorship, and the journal will be edited jointly by us, with Pat Henry ascending to the (...)
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  35. Art, behavior, and the anthropologists.Denis Dutton - manuscript
    DO SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY STAND with the sciences or with the humanities? Most attempts to settle this question involve comparing these disciplines with the natural sciences on the one hand and with history on the other. If we take history as paradigmatic of the various forms of humanistic inquiry, we will certainly find many illuminating comparisons to be drawn between it and the social sciences, but history is not the only humanistic inquiry. In fact, there exists another whole realm of (...)
     
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  36.  9
    America's most wanted, and why no one wants it.Denis Dutton - 1998 - Philosophy and Literature 22 (2):530-543.
  37.  20
    Bookmarks.Denis Dutton - 1990 - Philosophy and Literature 14 (2):446-454.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Bookmarks When most of us think of the losses for literature, music, and art caused by the First World War, the names that typically spring to mind are Rupert Brooke, WUfred Owen, and perhaps George Butterworth. This is conventional Anglocentrism. The millions of young victims of that conflict included many of the most promising artistic and literary talents from across Europe and beyond. The magnitude of this loss is (...)
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  38.  3
    Bookmarks.Denis Dutton - 1989 - Philosophy and Literature 13 (2):426-434.
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  39.  3
    Bookmarks.Denis Dutton - 1991 - Philosophy and Literature 15 (2):377-390.
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  40.  23
    Beauty Is Fun and Fun Beauty —or Is that All Ye Need to Know?Denis Dutton - 1992 - Philosophy and Literature 16 (2):432-437.
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  41.  20
    Beethoven on Prozac.Denis Dutton - 1997 - Philosophy and Literature 21 (2):340-345.
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  42.  5
    Book reviews: H. Gene Blocker, the aesthetics of primitive art.Denis Dutton - 1995 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 53 (3):321-322.
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  43.  61
    Criticism and method.Denis Dutton - 1973 - British Journal of Aesthetics 13 (3):232-242.
    The charge that a particular critical remark is “irrelevant” to its object is one of the most frequently heard in discussion and debate among critics. Frequently heard because frequently true: there has never been a shortage of criticism which aimlessly relates the work to the artist’s biography, or invokes inappropriate artistic standards, or employs pointless historical speculation, or describes the critic’s own foggy reveries to misdirect our attention and obscure the essential significance of the object before us. But even if (...)
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  44.  33
    Darwin and political theory.Denis Dutton - 2003 - Philosophy and Literature 27 (1):241-254.
    Evolutionary psychology has much to say about the origins of human political structures. Paul Rubin argues persuasively that given our hard-wired sociality, democracy is the best, most stable political arrangement we can hope for. He is correct in this view.
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  45.  19
    Decontextualized Crab; Nietzsche Dreams of Detroit.Denis Dutton - 1992 - Philosophy and Literature 16 (1):239-249.
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  46. Delusions of postmodernism.Denis Dutton - manuscript
    That postmodernism is a general cultural mood and a style in art, architecture, and literature is uncontroversial. But does postmodernism present a coherent intellectual doctrine or theory of politics, art, or life? In the discussion which follows, I will concentrate on two aspects of the intellectual pretensions of postmodernism. First, I examine the postmodernist claim that to justify the idea that the postmodern world is characterized by a general indeterminacy of meaning. Next I will look at aspects of the postmodernist (...)
     
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  47. Dare to think for yourself.Denis Dutton - unknown
    With Toni Morrison, I acknowledge that what I think and do is already inscribed on my teaching, and all my work. Indeed, we do "teach values by having them," or at least cannot but reveal our values in the classroom in one manner or another. This is not a voluntary option for those of us who teach in higher education or anywhere else: it is a permanent feature of the human condition. I sit at my computer overlooking a grass commons (...)
     
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  48.  8
    Editorial: Truth Matters.Denis Dutton & Patrick Patrick Gerard Henry - 1996 - Philosophy and Literature 20 (2):299-304.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Truth MattersOnce in a while stunning new ideas that energize a scholarly discipline—or even wreck it altogether—come from the outside. The most influential philosopher of science in the last generation was not a philosopher at all, but an historian and physicist, Thomas Kuhn. Ernst Gombrich, an art historian, has deeply informed the philosophy of art, as the linguist Noam Chomsky has affected the philosophy of language. And Jacques Derrida (...)
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  49. Forgery and plagiarism.Denis Dutton - manuscript
    FORGERY and PLAGIARISM are both forms of fraud. In committing art forgery I claim my work is by another person. As a plagiarist, I claim another person’s work is my own. In forgery, someone’s name is stolen in order to add value to the wrong work; in plagiarism someone’s work is stolen in order to give credit to the wrong author.
     
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  50. Freedom and the theatre of ideas.Denis Dutton - manuscript
    I want to address a number of interrelated issues that confront the modern theatre. My main concern is to ask, why should we have a theatre of ideas ? The theatre of entertainment is unproblematic: though it has an important place in cultural life, it is undemanding, having the essential purpose of amusement. The theatre of ideas, on the other hand, is a theatre that provokes us to think about morality, human relations, history, or politics. What place does a theatre (...)
     
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