Results for 'Moral distress'

975 found
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  1.  67
    Predictive Psychosocial Factors of Child-to-Parent Violence in a Sample of Mexican Adolescents.Cristian Suárez-Relinque, Gonzalo del Moral Arroyo, Teresa I. Jiménez, Juan Evaristo Calleja & Juan Carlos Sánchez - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    The aim of this study was to carry out a psychosocial analysis of child-to-parent violence (CPV) in a sample of school adolescents, considering a set of individual variables (psychological distress, problematic use of social networking sites, and perceived non-conformist social reputation) and family variables (open and problematic communication with parents) according to sex. The sample consisted of 3,731 adolescents (54% boys), aged between 14 and 16 years (M = 14.6 years, SD = 0.567), from the state of Nuevo León, (...)
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  2.  57
    Moral Distress: What Are We Measuring?Laura Kolbe & Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (4):46-58.
    While various definitions of moral distress have been proposed, some agreement exists that it results from illegitimate constraints in clinical practice affecting healthcare professionals’ moral agency. If we are to reduce moral distress, instruments measuring it should provide relevant information about such illegitimate constraints. Unfortunately, existing instruments fail to do so. We discuss here several shortcomings of major instruments in use: their inability to determine whether reports of moral distress involve an accurate assessment (...)
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  3.  22
    Moral distress in critical care nursing: The state of the science.Natalie Susan McAndrew, Jane Leske & Kathryn Schroeter - 2018 - Nursing Ethics 25 (5):552-570.
    Background:Moral distress is a complex phenomenon frequently experienced by critical care nurses. Ethical conflicts in this practice area are related to technological advancement, high intensity work environments, and end-of-life decisions.Objectives:An exploration of contemporary moral distress literature was undertaken to determine measurement, contributing factors, impact, and interventions.Review Methods:This state of the science review focused on moral distress research in critical care nursing from 2009 to 2015, and included 12 qualitative, 24 quantitative, and 6 mixed methods (...)
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  4.  32
    Moral distress in nurses caring for patients with Covid-19.Henry J. Silverman, Raya Elfadel Kheirbek, Gyasi Moscou-Jackson & Jenni Day - 2021 - Nursing Ethics 28 (7-8):1137-1164.
    Background:Moral distress occurs when constraints prevent healthcare providers from acting in accordance with their core moral values to provide good patient care. The experience of moral distress in nurses might be magnified during the current Covid-19 pandemic.Objective:To explore causes of moral distress in nurses caring for Covid-19 patients and identify strategies to enhance their moral resiliency.Research design:A qualitative study using a qualitative content analysis of focus group discussions and in-depth interviews. We purposively (...)
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  5.  36
    Moral distress in Turkish intensive care nurses.Serife Karagozoglu, Gulay Yildirim, Dilek Ozden & Ziynet Çınar - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (2):209-224.
    Background:Moral distress is a common problem among professionals working in the field of healthcare. Moral distress is the distress experienced by a professional when he or she cannot fulfill the correct action due to several obstacles, although he or she is aware of what it is. The level of moral distress experienced by nurses working in intensive care units varies from one country/culture/institution to another. However, in Turkey, there is neither a measurement tool (...)
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  6.  37
    Moral distress in Turkish intensive care nurses.Serife Karagozoglu, Gulay Yildirim, Dilek Ozden & Ziynet Çınar - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (2):209-224.
    Background:Moral distress is a common problem among professionals working in the field of healthcare. Moral distress is the distress experienced by a professional when he or she cannot fulfill the correct action due to several obstacles, although he or she is aware of what it is. The level of moral distress experienced by nurses working in intensive care units varies from one country/culture/institution to another. However, in Turkey, there is neither a measurement tool (...)
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  7.  48
    'Moral distress' - time to abandon a flawed nursing construct?Megan-Jane Johnstone & Alison Hutchinson - 2015 - Nursing Ethics 22 (1):5-14.
    Moral distress has been characterised in the nursing literature as a major problem affecting nurses in all healthcare systems. It has been portrayed as threatening the integrity of nurses and ultimately the quality of patient care. However, nursing discourse on moral distress is not without controversy. The notion itself is conceptually flawed and suffers from both theoretical and practical difficulties. Nursing research investigating moral distress is also problematic on account of being methodologically weak and (...)
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  8. Moral distress in nursing: contributing factors, outcomes and interventions.Adam S. Burston & Anthony G. Tuckett - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (3):312-324.
    Moral distress has been widely reviewed across many care contexts and among a range of disciplines. Interest in this area has produced a plethora of studies, commentary and critique. An overview of the literature around moral distress reveals a commonality about factors contributing to moral distress, the attendant outcomes of this distress and a core set of interventions recommended to address these. Interventions at both personal and organizational levels have been proposed. The relevance (...)
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  9.  45
    Moral Distress Reconsidered.Joan McCarthy & Rick Deady - 2008 - Nursing Ethics 15 (2):254-262.
    Moral distress has received much attention in the international nursing literature in recent years. In this article, we describe the evolution of the concept of moral distress among nursing theorists from its initial delineation by the philosopher Jameton to its subsequent deployment as an umbrella concept describing the impact of moral constraints on health professionals and the patients for whom they care. The article raises worries about the way in which the concept of moral (...)
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  10.  10
    Moral distress among nurses: A mixed-methods study.Chuleeporn Prompahakul, Jessica Keim-Malpass, Virginia LeBaron, Guofen Yan & Elizabeth G. Epstein - 2021 - Nursing Ethics 28 (7-8):1165-1182.
    Background:Moral distress is recognized as a problem affecting healthcare professionals globally. Unaddressed moral distress may lead to withdrawal from the moral dimensions of patient care, burnout, or leaving the profession. Despite the importance, studies related to moral distress are scant in Thailand.Objective:This study aims to describe the experience of moral distress and related factors among Thai nurses.Design:A convergent parallel mixed-methods design was used. The quantitative and qualitative data were collected in parallel (...)
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  11.  9
    Moral distress experienced by non-Western nurses: An integrative review.Chuleeporn Prompahakul & Elizabeth G. Epstein - 2020 - Nursing Ethics 27 (3):778-795.
    Background: Moral distress has been identified as a significant issue in nursing practice for many decades. However, most studies have involved American nurses or Western medicine settings. Cultural differences between Western and non-Western countries might influence the experience of moral distress. Therefore, the literature regarding moral distress experiences among non-Western nurses is in need of review. Aim: The aim of this integrative review was to identify, describe, and synthesize previous primary studies on moral (...)
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  12.  34
    Moral distress in undergraduate nursing students.Loredana Sasso, Annamaria Bagnasco, Monica Bianchi, Valentina Bressan & Franco Carnevale - 2016 - Nursing Ethics 23 (5):523-534.
    Background:Nurses and nursing students appear vulnerable to moral distress when faced with ethical dilemmas or decision-making in clinical practice. As a result, they may experience professional dissatisfaction and their relationships with patients, families, and colleagues may be compromised. The impact of moral distress may manifest as anger, feelings of guilt and frustration, a desire to give up the profession, loss of self-esteem, depression, and anxiety.Objectives:The purpose of this review was to describe how dilemmas and environmental, relational, (...)
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  13.  52
    Moral distress interventions: An integrative literature review.Vanessa K. Amos & Elizabeth Epstein - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):582-607.
    Moral distress has been well reviewed in the literature with established deleterious side effects for all healthcare professionals, including nurses, physicians, and others. Yet, little is known about the quality and effectiveness of interventions directed to address moral distress. The aim of this integrative review is to analyze published intervention studies to determine their efficacy and applicability across hospital settings. Of the initial 1373 articles discovered in October 2020, 18 were appraised as relevant, with 1 study (...)
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  14.  6
    Situating moral distress within relational ethics.Sadie Deschenes & Diane Kunyk - 2020 - Nursing Ethics 27 (3):767-777.
    Nurses may, and often do, experience moral distress in their careers. This is related to the complicated work environment and the complex nature of ethical situations in everyday nursing practice. The outcomes of moral distress may include psychological and physical symptoms, reduced job satisfaction and even inadequate or inappropriate nursing care. Moral distress can also impact retention of nurses. Although research has grown considerably over the past few decades, there is still a great deal (...)
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  15.  13
    Measuring moral distress in health professionals using the MMD-HP-SPA scale.Manuel Romero-Saldaña, Manuel Lopez-Valero, Alejandro Gomez-Carranza, Dolores Aguilera-Lopez, Jaime Boceta-Osuna, Cristina M. Beltran-Aroca & Eloy Girela-Lopez - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1):1-12.
    BackgroundMoral distress (MD) is the psychological damage caused when people are forced to witness or carry out actions which go against their fundamental moral values. The main objective was to evaluate the prevalence and predictive factors associated with MD among health professionals during the pandemic and to determine its causes.MethodsA regional, observational and cross-sectional study in a sample of 566 professionals from the Public Health Service of Andalusia (68.7% female; 66.9% physicians) who completed the MMD-HP-SPA scale to determine (...)
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  16. Moral distress in nursing practice in Malawi.V. M. Maluwa, J. Andre, P. Ndebele & E. Chilemba - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (2):196-207.
    The aim of this study was to explore the existence of moral distress among nurses in Lilongwe District of Malawi. Qualitative research was conducted in selected health institutions of Lilongwe District in Malawi to assess knowledge and causes of moral distress among nurses and coping mechanisms and sources of support that are used by morally distressed nurses. Data were collected from a purposive sample of 20 nurses through in-depth interviews using a semi-structured interview guide. Thematic analysis (...)
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  17.  41
    Moral distress in nurses: Resources and constraints, consequences, and interventions.Mohammad Javad Ghazanfari, Amir Emami Zeydi, Reza Panahi, Reza Ghanbari, Fateme Jafaraghaee, Hamed Mortazavi & Samad Karkhah - 2022 - Clinical Ethics 17 (3):265-271.
    Background Moral distress is a complex and challenging issue in the nursing profession that can negatively affect the nurses’ job satisfaction and retention and the quality of patient care. This study focused on describing the resources and constraints, consequences, and interventions of moral distress in nurses. Methods In a literature review, an extensive electronic search was conducted in databases including PubMed, ISI, Scopus as well as Google Scholar search engine using the keywords including “moral (...)” and “nurses” to identify resources, constraints, consequences, and interventions about moral distress in nurses, from the earliest records up to 26 December 2020. The required data were extracted from 61 relevant studies by two independent reviewers. Results Resources and constraints in the occurrence of moral distress among nurses can be divided into three general categories including internal factors, clinical factors, and external factors. The consequences of moral distress on nurses and the medical system reduced moral sensitivity, development of psychological and physical health problems, and the intention to leave the profession. The potential effective interventions were the implementation of integrated communication programs, strengthening physician–nurse collaboration, nursing involvement in clinical decision-making and end-of-life issues, social support, using a resiliency bundle, interdisciplinary discussion, and promoting nurses’ ethical and communication skills. Conclusion There are a wide range of resources and constraints impacting moral distress in nurses that could lead to negative consequences. Further studies are necessary to identify, evaluate, and implement a range of potential effective interventions for the management of moral distress in nurses. (shrink)
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  18.  97
    Moral Distress and Moral Conflict in Clinical Ethics.Carina Fourie - 2013 - Bioethics 29 (2):91-97.
    Much research is currently being conducted on health care practitioners' experiences of moral distress, especially the experience of nurses. What moral distress is, however, is not always clearly delineated and there is some debate as to how it should be defined. This article aims to help to clarify moral distress. My methodology consists primarily of a conceptual analysis, with especial focus on Andrew Jameton's influential description of moral distress. I will identify and (...)
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  19.  17
    Moral distress and burnout in Iranian nurses: The mediating effect of workplace bullying.Fardin Ajoudani, Rahim Baghaei & Mojgan Lotfi - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1834-1847.
    Background:Moral distress and workplace bullying are important issues in the nursing workplace that appear to affect nurse’s burnout.Aim:To investigate the relationship between moral distress and burnout in Iranian nurses, as mediated by their perceptions of workplace bullying.Ethical considerations:The research was approved by the committee of ethics in research of the Urmia University of Medical Sciences.Method:This is a correlation study using a cross-sectional design with anonymous questionnaires as study instruments (i.e. Moral Distress Scale-Revised, Maslach Burnout (...)
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  20.  38
    Moral Distress, Workplace Health, and Intrinsic Harm.Elijah Weber - 2015 - Bioethics 30 (4):244-250.
    Moral distress is now being recognized as a frequent experience for many health care providers, and there's good evidence that it has a negative impact on the health care work environment. However, contemporary discussions of moral distress have several problems. First, they tend to rely on inadequate characterizations of moral distress. As a result, subsequent investigations regarding the frequency and consequences of moral distress often proceed without a clear understanding of the phenomenon (...)
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  21.  58
    Moral Distress and the Contemporary Plight of Health Professionals.Wendy Austin - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (1):27-38.
    Once a term used primarily by moral philosophers, “moral distress” is increasingly used by health professionals to name experiences of frustration and failure in fulfilling moral obligations inherent to their fiduciary relationship with the public. Although such challenges have always been present, as has discord regarding the right thing to do in particular situations, there is a radical change in the degree and intensity of moral distress being expressed. Has the plight of professionals in (...)
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  22.  33
    Moral distress in health care: when is it fitting?Lisa Tessman - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (2):165-177.
    Nurses and other medical practitioners often experience moral distress: they feel an anguished sense of responsibility for what they take to be their own moral failures, even when those failures were unavoidable. However, in such cases other people do not tend to think it is right to hold them responsible. This is an interesting mismatch of reactions. It might seem that the mismatch should be remedied by assuring the practitioner that they are not responsible, but I argue (...)
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  23.  11
    Moral distress in acute psychiatric nursing: Multifaceted dilemmas and demands.Trine-Lise Jansen, Marit Helene Hem, Lars Johan Dambolt & Ingrid Hanssen - 2020 - Nursing Ethics 27 (5):1315-1326.
    BackgroundIn this article, the sources and features of moral distress as experienced by acute psychiatric care nurses are explored.Research designA qualitative design with 16 individual in-depth interviews was chosen. Braun and Clarke’s six analytic phases were used.Ethical considerationsApproval was obtained from the Norwegian Social Science Data Services. Participation was confidential and voluntary.FindingsBased on findings, a somewhat wider definition of moral distress is introduced where nurses experiencing being morally constrained, facing moral dilemmas or moral doubt (...)
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  24. Nurse Moral Distress: a proposed theory and research agenda.Mary C. Corley - 2002 - Nursing Ethics 9 (6):636-650.
    As professionals, nurses are engaged in a moral endeavour, and thus confront many challenges in making the right decision and taking the right action. When nurses cannot do what they think is right, they experience moral distress that leaves a moral residue. This article proposes a theory of moral distress and a research agenda to develop a better understanding of moral distress, how to prevent it, and, when it cannot be prevented, how (...)
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  25.  10
    Parent moral distress in serious pediatric illness: A dimensional analysis.Kim Mooney-Doyle & Connie M. Ulrich - 2020 - Nursing Ethics 27 (3):821-837.
    Background: Moral distress is an important and well-studied phenomenon among nurses and other healthcare providers, yet the conceptualization of parental moral distress remains unclear. Objective: The objective of this dimensional analysis was to describe the nature of family moral distress in serious pediatric illness. Design and methods: A dimensional analysis of articles retrieved from a librarian-assisted systematic review of Scopus, CINAHL, and PsychInfo was conducted, focusing on how children, parents, other family members, and healthcare (...)
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  26.  38
    Moral distress in paediatric oncology: Contributing factors and group differences.Pernilla Pergert, Cecilia Bartholdson, Klas Blomgren & Margareta af Sandeberg - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2351-2363.
    Background:Providing oncological care to children is demanding and ethical issues concerning what is best for the child can contribute to moral distress.Objectives:To explore healthcare professionals’ experiences of situations that generate moral distress in Swedish paediatric oncology.Research design:In this national study, data collection was conducted using the Swedish Moral Distress Scale-Revised. The data analysis included descriptive statistics and non-parametric analysis of differences between groups.Participants and research context:Healthcare professionals at all paediatric oncology centres in Sweden were (...)
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  27.  54
    Moral distress and ethical climate in intensive care medicine during COVID-19: a nationwide study.Walther N. K. A. van Mook, Sebastiaan A. Pronk, Iwan van der Horst, Elien Pragt, Ruth Heijnen-Panis, Hans Kling, Nathalie M. van Dijk, Math J. J. M. Candel, Vincent J. H. S. Gilissen & Moniek A. Donkers - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-12.
    BackgroundThe COVID-19 pandemic has created ethical challenges for intensive care unit (ICU) professionals, potentially causing moral distress. This study explored the levels and causes of moral distress and the ethical climate in Dutch ICUs during COVID-19.MethodsAn extended version of the Measurement of Moral Distress for Healthcare Professionals (MMD-HP) and Ethical Decision Making Climate Questionnaire (EDMCQ) were online distributed among all 84 ICUs. Moral distress scores in nurses and intensivists were compared with the (...)
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  28.  55
    Nurse moral distress and ethical work environment.Mary C. Corley, Ptlene Minick, R. K. Elswick & Mary Jacobs - 2005 - Nursing Ethics 12 (4):381-390.
    This study examined the relationship between moral distress intensity, moral distress frequency and the ethical work environment, and explored the relationship of demographic characteristics to moral distress intensity and frequency. A group of 106 nurses from two large medical centers reported moderate levels of moral distress intensity, low levels of moral distress frequency, and a moderately positive ethical work environment. Moral distress intensity and ethical work environment were correlated (...)
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  29. Moral distress : context, sources, and consequences.Alisa Carse & Cynda Hylton Rushton - 2018 - In Cynda H. Rushton (ed.), Moral resilience: transforming moral suffering in health care. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
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  30.  15
    Moral distress in medical student reflective writing.Mary Camp & John Sadler - 2019 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 10 (1):70-78.
    Purpose: Moral distress occurs when one identifies an ethically appropriate course of action but cannot carry it out. In this conceptualization, medical students may be particularly vulnerable to m...
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  31.  32
    Moral distress among critical care nurses: A cross-cultural comparison.Kaoru Ashida, Tetsuharu Kawashima, Aki Kawakami & Makoto Tanaka - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (6):1341-1352.
    BackgroundAlthough, moral distress presents a serious problem among critical care nurses in many countries, limited research has been conducted on it. A validated scale has been developed to evaluate moral distress and has enabled cross-cultural comparison for seeking its root causes.Research aimsThis study aimed to (1) clarify the current status of moral distress among nurses who worked in critical care areas in Japan, (2) compare the moral distress levels among nurses in Japan (...)
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  32.  37
    Moral distress in healthcare assistants: A discussion with recommendations.Daniel Rodger, Bruce Blackshaw & Amanda Young - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2306-2313.
    Background:Moral distress can be broadly described as the psychological distress that can develop in response to a morally challenging event. In the context of healthcare, its effects are well documented in the nursing profession, but there is a paucity of research exploring its relevance to healthcare assistants.Objective:This article aims to examine the existing research on moral distress in healthcare assistants, identity the important factors that are likely to contribute to moral distress, and propose (...)
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  33.  27
    Moral distress and its influencing factors: A cross-sectional study in China.Zhang Wenwen, Wu Xiaoyan, Zhan Yufang, Ci Lifeng & Sun Congcong - 2018 - Nursing Ethics 25 (4):470-480.
    Objective:The purpose of this study was to describe the current situation of moral distress and to explore its influencing factors among Chinese nurses.Methods:This is an exploratory, descriptive design study. A total of 465 clinical nurses from different departments in three Grade-III, Level-A hospitals in Jinan, Shandong Province, completed the questionnaires, including demographics questionnaire, Chinese version of Moral Distress Scale–Revised, and Job Diagnostic Survey.Ethical considerations:The study was approved by the university ethics board and the local health service (...)
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  34.  24
    From moral distress to burnout through work-family conflict: the protective role of resilience and positive refocusing.Chiara Bernuzzi, Ilaria Setti, Marina Maffoni & Valentina Sommovigo - 2022 - Ethics and Behavior 32 (7):578-600.
    This study analyses for the first time whether and when moral distress may be related to work-family conflict and burnout. Additionally, this study examines whether resilience and positive refocusing might protect healthcare professionals from the negative effects of moral distress. A total of 153 Italian healthcare professionals completed self-report questionnaires. Simple and moderated mediation models revealed that moral distress was positively related to burnout, directly and indirectly, as mediated by work-family conflict. Highly resilient professionals (...)
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  35.  14
    Moral distress to moral success: Strategies to decrease moral distress.Lindsay R. Semler - 2023 - Nursing Ethics 30 (1):58-70.
    Background: Moral distress, which is especially high in critical care nurses, has significant negative implications for nurses, patients, organizations, and healthcare as a whole. Aim: A moral distress workshop and follow-up activities were implemented in an intensive care unit in order to decrease levels of moral distress and increase nurses’ perceived comfort and confidence in ethical decision-making. Design: A quality improvement (QI) initiative was conducted using a pre- and post-intervention design. The program consisted of (...)
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  36.  9
    Measuring Moral Distress: Improving the Tools by Educating Clinicians.Lauren Boxell & Elizabeth Lanphier - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics 23 (4):61-63.
    In “Moral Distress: What are we measuring?” Kolbe and de Melo-Martin (2023) rightly note that varied understanding of moral distress, paired with shortcomings in existing empirical tools to accurat...
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  37.  56
    Moral Distress: An Innovative and Important Subject to Study in Brazil: Commentary on “A Reflection on Moral Distress in Nursing Together With a Current Application of the Concept” by Andrew Jameton.Valéria Lerch Lunardi - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):309-312.
    There have been recurrent reports of fragilities in the Brazilian health system, especially in public institutions. In this commentary, I argue that moral distress in nursing in Brazil can still be considered an innovative and important subject of study. I also highlight the relevance of engaging educational institutions in the development of policies about environmental sustainability. It is relevant to continue studying moral distress in nursing and in health care generally in order to contribute to the (...)
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  38.  12
    Moral distress, moral courage, and career identity among nurses: A cross-sectional study.Mengyun Peng, Shinya Saito, Hong Guan & Xiaohuan Ma - 2023 - Nursing Ethics 30 (3):358-369.
    BackgroundThe concept of career identity is integral to nursing practices and forms the basis of the nursing professions. Positive career identity is essential for providing high-quality care, optimizing patient outcomes, and enhancing the retention of health professionals. Therefore, there is a need to explore potential influencing variables, thereby developing effective interventions to improve career identity.ObjectivesTo investigate the relationship between moral distress, moral courage, and career identity, and explore the mediating role of moral courage between moral (...)
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  39.  16
    Moral Distress Among Healthcare Professionals at a Health System. &Na - 2013 - Jona’s Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 15 (3):119-120.
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  40.  25
    Moral distress experienced by psychiatric nurses in Japan.Kayoko Ohnishi, Yasuko Ohgushi, Masataka Nakano, Hirohide Fujii, Hiromi Tanaka, Kazuyo Kitaoka, Jun Nakahara & Yugo Narita - 2010 - Nursing Ethics 17 (6):726-740.
    This study aimed to: (1) develop and evaluate the Moral Distress Scale for Psychiatric nurses (MDS-P); (2) use the MDS-P to examine the moral distress experienced by Japanese psychiatric nurses; and (3) explore the correlation between moral distress and burnout. A questionnaire on the intensity and frequency of moral distress items (the MDS-P: 15 items grouped into three factors), a burnout scale (Maslach Burnout Inventory — General Survey) and demographic questions were administered (...)
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  41.  10
    Mitigating Moral Distress through Ethics Consultation.Georgina Morley, Lauren R. Sankary & Cristie Cole Horsburgh - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (4):61-63.
    While the phenomenon of ‘moral distress’ has been of interest to the nursing community since Jameton first described it in 1984, moral distress is now understood to effect healthcare professionals...
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  42.  11
    Moral Distress Under Structural Violence: Clinician Experience in Brazil Caring for Low-Income Families of Children with Severe Disabilities.Ana Carolina Gahyva Sale & Carolyn Smith-Morris - 2023 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 32 (2):231-243.
    Rigorous attention has been paid to moral distress among healthcare professionals, largely in high-income settings. More obscure is the presence and impact of moral distress in contexts of chronic poverty and structural violence. Intercultural ethics research and dialogue can help reveal how the long-term presence of morally distressing conditions might influence the moral experience and agency of healthcare providers. This article discusses mixed-methods research at one nongovernmental social support agency and clinic in Rio de Janeiro, (...)
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  43.  29
    Moral distress in nurses in oncology and haematology units.M. Lazzarin, A. Biondi & S. Di Mauro - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (2):183-195.
    One of the difficulties nurses experience in clinical practice in relation to ethical issues in connection with young oncology patients is moral distress. In this descriptive correlational study, the Moral Distress Scale-Paediatric Version (MDS-PV) was translated from the original language and tested on a conventional sample of nurses working in paediatric oncology and haematology wards, in six north paediatric hospitals of Italy. 13.7% of the total respondents claimed that they had changed unit or hospital due to (...)
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  44.  55
    Moral Distress Reexamined: A Feminist Interpretation of Nurses' Identities, Relationships, and Responsibilites. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Peter & Joan Liaschenko - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):337-345.
    Moral distress has been written about extensively in nursing and other fields. Often, however, it has not been used with much theoretical depth. This paper focuses on theorizing moral distress using feminist ethics, particularly the work of Margaret Urban Walker and Hilde Lindemann. Incorporating empirical findings, we argue that moral distress is the response to constraints experienced by nurses to their moral identities, responsibilities, and relationships. We recommend that health professionals get assistance in (...)
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  45.  57
    Measuring Moral Distress in Pharmacy and Clinical Practice.Sofia Kälvemark Sporrong, Anna T. Höglund & Bengt Arnetz - 2006 - Nursing Ethics 13 (4):416-427.
    This article presents the development, validation and application of an instrument to measure everyday moral distress in different health care settings. The concept of moral distress has been discussed and developed over 20 years. A few instruments have been developed to measure it, predominantly in nursing. The instrument presented here consists of two factors: level of moral distress, and tolerance/openness towards moral dilemmas. It was tested in four medical departments and three pharmacies, where (...)
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  46.  13
    Addressing Moral Distress: lessons Learnt from a Non-Interventional Longitudinal Study on Moral Distress.Trisha M. Prentice, Dilini I. Imbulana, Lynn Gillam, Peter G. Davis & Annie Janvier - 2022 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 13 (4):226-236.
    Moral distress is prevalent within the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and can negatively affect clinicians. Studies have evaluated the causes of moral distress and interventions to mitigate it...
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  47.  16
    Moral Distress, Conscientious Practice, and the Endurance of Ethics in Health Care through Times of Crisis and Calm.Lauris Christopher Kaldjian - 2024 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 49 (1):11-27.
    When health professionals experience moral distress during routine clinical practice, they are challenged to maintain integrity through conscientious practice guided by ethical principles and virtues that promote the dignity of all human beings who need care. Their integrity also needs preservation during a crisis like the COVID-19 pandemic, especially when faced with triage protocols that allocate scarce resources. Although a crisis may change our ability to provide life-saving treatment to all who need it, a crisis should not change (...)
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  48.  7
    Moral Distress: A Framework for Offering Relief through Debrief.Shaylona Kirk & Shilpa Shashidhara - 2020 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 31 (4):364-371.
    Moral distress, if left unaddressed, leads to a number of harmful emotions and behaviors that take a toll on the personal and professional well-being of healthcare workers. In this article, a clinical case is used to illustrate a moral distress debriefing framework that can be utilized by clinical ethicists and healthcare professionals with the appropriate skill set. The first part of the framework is preparatory; it includes guidance on how to identify the needs of healthcare providers, (...)
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  49.  59
    Moral Distress: Inability to Act or Discomfort with Moral Subjectivity?Mark Repenshek - 2009 - Nursing Ethics 16 (6):734-742.
    Amidst the wealth of literature on the topic of moral distress in nursing, a single citation is ubiquitous, Andrew Jameton’s 1984 book Nursing practice. The definition Jameton formulated reads ‘... moral distress arises when one knows the right thing to do, but institutional constraints make it nearly impossible to pursue the right course of action’. Unfortunately, it appears that, despite the frequent use of Jameton’s definition of moral distress, the definition itself remains uncritically examined. (...)
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  50.  24
    Moral distress of undergraduate nursing students in community health nursing.Rowena L. Escolar Chua & Jaclyn Charmaine J. Magpantay - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2340-2350.
    Background:Nurses exposed to community health nursing commonly encounter situations that can be morally distressing. However, most research on moral distress has focused on acute care settings and very little research has explored moral distress in a community health nursing setting especially among nursing students.Aim:To explore the moral distress experiences encountered by undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students in community health nursing.Research design:A descriptive qualitative design was employed to explore the community health nursing experiences of the nursing (...)
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