Results for 'Moral distress'

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  1.  41
    Moral Distress Reexamined: A Feminist Interpretation of Nurses' Identities, Relationships, and Responsibilites. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Peter & Joan Liaschenko - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):337-345.
    Moral distress has been written about extensively in nursing and other fields. Often, however, it has not been used with much theoretical depth. This paper focuses on theorizing moral distress using feminist ethics, particularly the work of Margaret Urban Walker and Hilde Lindemann. Incorporating empirical findings, we argue that moral distress is the response to constraints experienced by nurses to their moral identities, responsibilities, and relationships. We recommend that health professionals get assistance in (...)
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  2.  78
    Moral distress in nursing: contributing factors, outcomes and interventions.Adam S. Burston & Anthony G. Tuckett - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (3):312-324.
    Moral distress has been widely reviewed across many care contexts and among a range of disciplines. Interest in this area has produced a plethora of studies, commentary and critique. An overview of the literature around moral distress reveals a commonality about factors contributing to moral distress, the attendant outcomes of this distress and a core set of interventions recommended to address these. Interventions at both personal and organizational levels have been proposed. The relevance (...)
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  3.  50
    Moral Distress: Tensions as Springboards for Action. [REVIEW]Colleen Varcoe, Bernadette Pauly, George Webster & Janet Storch - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (1):51-62.
    In the previous four papers in this series, individual versus structural or contextual factors have informed various understandings of moral distress. In this final paper, we summarize some of the key tensions raised in previous papers and use these tensions as springboards to identify directions for action among practitioners, educators, researchers, policymakers and others. In particular, we recognize the need to more explicitly politicize the concept of moral distress in order to understand how such distress (...)
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  4.  83
    Moral Distress and Moral Conflict in Clinical Ethics.Carina Fourie - 2015 - Bioethics 29 (2):91-97.
    Much research is currently being conducted on health care practitioners' experiences of moral distress, especially the experience of nurses. What moral distress is, however, is not always clearly delineated and there is some debate as to how it should be defined. This article aims to help to clarify moral distress. My methodology consists primarily of a conceptual analysis, with especial focus on Andrew Jameton's influential description of moral distress. I will identify and (...)
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  5.  7
    Moral distress and burnout in Iranian nurses: The mediating effect of workplace bullying.Fardin Ajoudani, Rahim Baghaei & Mojgan Lotfi - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (6):1834-1847.
    Background: Moral distress and workplace bullying are important issues in the nursing workplace that appear to affect nurse’s burnout. Aim: To investigate the relationship between moral distress and burnout in Iranian nurses, as mediated by their perceptions of workplace bullying. Ethical considerations: The research was approved by the committee of ethics in research of the Urmia University of Medical Sciences. Method: This is a correlation study using a cross-sectional design with anonymous questionnaires as study instruments. Data (...)
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  6. Moral distress in nursing practice in Malawi.V. M. Maluwa, J. Andre, P. Ndebele & E. Chilemba - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (2):196-207.
    The aim of this study was to explore the existence of moral distress among nurses in Lilongwe District of Malawi. Qualitative research was conducted in selected health institutions of Lilongwe District in Malawi to assess knowledge and causes of moral distress among nurses and coping mechanisms and sources of support that are used by morally distressed nurses. Data were collected from a purposive sample of 20 nurses through in-depth interviews using a semi-structured interview guide. Thematic analysis (...)
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  7.  14
    Moral distress in health care: when is it fitting?Lisa Tessman - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (2):165-177.
    Nurses and other medical practitioners often experience moral distress: they feel an anguished sense of responsibility for what they take to be their own moral failures, even when those failures were unavoidable. However, in such cases other people do not tend to think it is right to hold them responsible. This is an interesting mismatch of reactions. It might seem that the mismatch should be remedied by assuring the practitioner that they are not responsible, but I argue (...)
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  8.  21
    Moral Distress Reconsidered.Joan McCarthy & Rick Deady - 2008 - Nursing Ethics 15 (2):254-262.
    Moral distress has received much attention in the international nursing literature in recent years. In this article, we describe the evolution of the concept of moral distress among nursing theorists from its initial delineation by the philosopher Jameton to its subsequent deployment as an umbrella concept describing the impact of moral constraints on health professionals and the patients for whom they care. The article raises worries about the way in which the concept of moral (...)
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  9.  4
    Moral distress in nurses: Resources and constraints, consequences, and interventions.Mohammad Javad Ghazanfari, Amir Emami Zeydi, Reza Panahi, Reza Ghanbari, Fateme Jafaraghaee, Hamed Mortazavi & Samad Karkhah - 2022 - Clinical Ethics 17 (3):265-271.
    Background Moral distress is a complex and challenging issue in the nursing profession that can negatively affect the nurses’ job satisfaction and retention and the quality of patient care. This study focused on describing the resources and constraints, consequences, and interventions of moral distress in nurses. Methods In a literature review, an extensive electronic search was conducted in databases including PubMed, ISI, Scopus as well as Google Scholar search engine using the keywords including “moral (...)” and “nurses” to identify resources, constraints, consequences, and interventions about moral distress in nurses, from the earliest records up to 26 December 2020. The required data were extracted from 61 relevant studies by two independent reviewers. Results Resources and constraints in the occurrence of moral distress among nurses can be divided into three general categories including internal factors, clinical factors, and external factors. The consequences of moral distress on nurses and the medical system reduced moral sensitivity, development of psychological and physical health problems, and the intention to leave the profession. The potential effective interventions were the implementation of integrated communication programs, strengthening physician–nurse collaboration, nursing involvement in clinical decision-making and end-of-life issues, social support, using a resiliency bundle, interdisciplinary discussion, and promoting nurses’ ethical and communication skills. Conclusion There are a wide range of resources and constraints impacting moral distress in nurses that could lead to negative consequences. Further studies are necessary to identify, evaluate, and implement a range of potential effective interventions for the management of moral distress in nurses. (shrink)
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  10.  27
    Moral Distress, Workplace Health, and Intrinsic Harm.Elijah Weber - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (4):244-250.
    Moral distress is now being recognized as a frequent experience for many health care providers, and there's good evidence that it has a negative impact on the health care work environment. However, contemporary discussions of moral distress have several problems. First, they tend to rely on inadequate characterizations of moral distress. As a result, subsequent investigations regarding the frequency and consequences of moral distress often proceed without a clear understanding of the phenomenon (...)
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  11. Moral distress in acute psychiatric nursing: Multifaceted dilemmas and demands.Trine-Lise Jansen, Marit Helene Hem, Lars Johan Dambolt & Ingrid Hanssen - 2020 - Nursing Ethics 27 (5):1315-1326.
    BackgroundIn this article, the sources and features of moral distress as experienced by acute psychiatric care nurses are explored.Research designA qualitative design with 16 individual in-depth interviews was chosen. Braun and Clarke’s six analytic phases were used.Ethical considerationsApproval was obtained from the Norwegian Social Science Data Services. Participation was confidential and voluntary.FindingsBased on findings, a somewhat wider definition of moral distress is introduced where nurses experiencing being morally constrained, facing moral dilemmas or moral doubt (...)
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  12.  50
    Moral Distress and its Interconnection with Moral Sensitivity and Moral Resilience: Viewed from the Philosophy of Viktor E. Frankl. [REVIEW]Kim Lützén & Béatrice Ewalds-Kvist - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):317-324.
    The interconnection between moral distress, moral sensitivity, and moral resilience was explored by constructing two hypothetical scenarios based on a recent Swedish newspaper report. In the first scenario, a 77-year-old man, rational and awake, was coded as “do not resuscitate” (DNR) against his daughter’s wishes. The patient died in the presence of nurses who were not permitted to resuscitate him. The second scenario concerned a 41-year-old man, who had been in a coma for three weeks. He (...)
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  13.  56
    Moral Distress: A Comparative Analysis of Theoretical Understandings and Inter-Related Concepts. [REVIEW]Kim Lützén & Beatrice Ewalds Kvist - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (1):13-25.
    Research on ethical dilemmas in health care has become increasingly salient during the last two decades resulting in confusion about the concept of moral distress. The aim of the present paper is to provide an overview and a comparative analysis of the theoretical understandings of moral distress and related concepts. The focus is on five concepts: moral distress, moral stress, stress of conscience, moral sensitivity and ethical climate. It is suggested that (...) distress connects mainly to a psychological perspective; stress of conscience more to a theological–philosophical standpoint; and moral stress mostly to a physiological perspective. Further analysis indicates that these thoughts can be linked to the concepts of moral sensitivity and ethical climate through a relationship to moral agency. Moral agency comprises a moral awareness of moral problems and moral responsibility for others. It is suggested that moral distress may serve as a positive catalyst in exercising moral agency. An interdisciplinary approach in research and practice broadens our understanding of moral distress and its impact on health care personnel and patient care. (shrink)
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  14.  48
    Moral Distress and the Contemporary Plight of Health Professionals.Wendy Austin - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (1):27-38.
    Once a term used primarily by moral philosophers, “moral distress” is increasingly used by health professionals to name experiences of frustration and failure in fulfilling moral obligations inherent to their fiduciary relationship with the public. Although such challenges have always been present, as has discord regarding the right thing to do in particular situations, there is a radical change in the degree and intensity of moral distress being expressed. Has the plight of professionals in (...)
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  15. Nurse Moral Distress: a proposed theory and research agenda.Mary C. Corley - 2002 - Nursing Ethics 9 (6):636-650.
    As professionals, nurses are engaged in a moral endeavour, and thus confront many challenges in making the right decision and taking the right action. When nurses cannot do what they think is right, they experience moral distress that leaves a moral residue. This article proposes a theory of moral distress and a research agenda to develop a better understanding of moral distress, how to prevent it, and, when it cannot be prevented, how (...)
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  16.  4
    From moral distress to burnout through work-family conflict: the protective role of resilience and positive refocusing.Chiara Bernuzzi, Ilaria Setti, Marina Maffoni & Valentina Sommovigo - 2022 - Ethics and Behavior 32 (7):578-600.
    This study analyses for the first time whether and when moral distress may be related to work-family conflict and burnout. Additionally, this study examines whether resilience and positive refocusing might protect healthcare professionals from the negative effects of moral distress. A total of 153 Italian healthcare professionals completed self-report questionnaires. Simple and moderated mediation models revealed that moral distress was positively related to burnout, directly and indirectly, as mediated by work-family conflict. Highly resilient professionals (...)
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  17.  41
    Nurse moral distress and ethical work environment.Mary C. Corley, Ptlene Minick, R. K. Elswick & Mary Jacobs - 2005 - Nursing Ethics 12 (4):381-390.
    This study examined the relationship between moral distress intensity, moral distress frequency and the ethical work environment, and explored the relationship of demographic characteristics to moral distress intensity and frequency. A group of 106 nurses from two large medical centers reported moderate levels of moral distress intensity, low levels of moral distress frequency, and a moderately positive ethical work environment. Moral distress intensity and ethical work environment were correlated (...)
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  18.  16
    Moral Distress Among Health System Managers: Exploratory Research in Two British Columbia Health Authorities. [REVIEW]Craig Mitton, Stuart Peacock, Jan Storch, Neale Smith & Evelyn Cornelissen - 2011 - Health Care Analysis 19 (2):107-121.
    Moral distress is a concept used to date in clinical literature to describe the experience of staff in circumstances in which they are prevented from delivering the kind of bedside care they believe is expected of them, professionally and ethically. Our research objective was to determine if this concept has relevance in terms of key health care managerial functions, such as priority setting and resource allocation. We conducted interviews and focus groups with mid- and senior-level managers in two (...)
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  19.  47
    Moral Distress: An Innovative and Important Subject to Study in Brazil: Commentary on “A Reflection on Moral Distress in Nursing Together With a Current Application of the Concept” by Andrew Jameton.Valéria Lerch Lunardi - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):309-312.
    There have been recurrent reports of fragilities in the Brazilian health system, especially in public institutions. In this commentary, I argue that moral distress in nursing in Brazil can still be considered an innovative and important subject of study. I also highlight the relevance of engaging educational institutions in the development of policies about environmental sustainability. It is relevant to continue studying moral distress in nursing and in health care generally in order to contribute to the (...)
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  20.  15
    Moral Distress: What Are We Measuring?Laura Kolbe & Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - forthcoming - American Journal of Bioethics:1-13.
    While various definitions of moral distress have been proposed, some agreement exists that it results from illegitimate constraints in clinical practice affecting healthcare professionals’ moral agency. If we are to reduce moral distress, instruments measuring it should provide relevant information about such illegitimate constraints. Unfortunately, existing instruments fail to do so. We discuss here several shortcomings of major instruments in use: their inability to determine whether reports of moral distress involve an accurate assessment (...)
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  21.  23
    Moral Distress as a Symptom of Dirty Hands.Daniel Tigard - 2019 - Res Publica 25 (3):353-371.
    The experience of ‘moral distress’ is an increasing focal point of contemporary medical and bioethics literature, yet it has received little attention in discussions intersecting with ethical theory. This is unfortunate, as it seems that the peculiar phenomenon may well help us to better understand a number of issues bearing both practical and theoretical significance. In this article, I provide a robust psychological profile of moral distress in order to shed a newfound light upon the longstanding (...)
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  22.  4
    Moral distress and ethical climate in intensive care medicine during COVID-19: a nationwide study.Walther N. K. A. van Mook, Sebastiaan A. Pronk, Iwan van der Horst, Elien Pragt, Ruth Heijnen-Panis, Hans Kling, Nathalie M. van Dijk, Math J. J. M. Candel, Vincent J. H. S. Gilissen & Moniek A. Donkers - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-12.
    BackgroundThe COVID-19 pandemic has created ethical challenges for intensive care unit professionals, potentially causing moral distress. This study explored the levels and causes of moral distress and the ethical climate in Dutch ICUs during COVID-19.MethodsAn extended version of the Measurement of Moral Distress for Healthcare Professionals and Ethical Decision Making Climate Questionnaire were online distributed among all 84 ICUs. Moral distress scores in nurses and intensivists were compared with the historical control group (...)
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  23.  28
    Moral distress in undergraduate nursing students.Loredana Sasso, Annamaria Bagnasco, Monica Bianchi, Valentina Bressan & Franco Carnevale - 2016 - Nursing Ethics 23 (5):523-534.
    Background:Nurses and nursing students appear vulnerable to moral distress when faced with ethical dilemmas or decision-making in clinical practice. As a result, they may experience professional dissatisfaction and their relationships with patients, families, and colleagues may be compromised. The impact of moral distress may manifest as anger, feelings of guilt and frustration, a desire to give up the profession, loss of self-esteem, depression, and anxiety.Objectives:The purpose of this review was to describe how dilemmas and environmental, relational, (...)
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  24.  2
    Moral distress to moral success: Strategies to decrease moral distress.Lindsay R. Semler - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics.
    Background: Moral distress, which is especially high in critical care nurses, has significant negative implications for nurses, patients, organizations, and healthcare as a whole. Aim: A moral distress workshop and follow-up activities were implemented in an intensive care unit in order to decrease levels of moral distress and increase nurses’ perceived comfort and confidence in ethical decision-making. Design: A quality improvement (QI) initiative was conducted using a pre- and post-intervention design. The program consisted of (...)
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  25.  15
    Moral distress in healthcare assistants: A discussion with recommendations.Daniel Rodger, Bruce Blackshaw & Amanda Young - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2306-2313.
    Background: Moral distress can be broadly described as the psychological distress that can develop in response to a morally challenging event. In the context of healthcare, its effects are well documented in the nursing profession, but there is a paucity of research exploring its relevance to healthcare assistants. Objective: This article aims to examine the existing research on moral distress in healthcare assistants, identity the important factors that are likely to contribute to moral (...), and propose preventative measures. Research Design: This is a survey of the existing literature on moral distress in healthcare assistants. It uses insights from moral distress in nursing to argue that healthcare assistants are also likely to experience moral distress in certain contexts. Participants and Research Context: No research participants were part of this analysis. Ethical Considerations: This article offers a conceptual analysis and recommendations only. Findings: The analysis identifies certain factors that may be particularly applicable to healthcare assistants such as powerlessness and a lack of ethical knowledge. We demonstrate that these factors contribute to moral distress. Discussion: Recommendations include various preventative measures such as regular reflective debriefing sessions involving healthcare assistants, nurses and other clinicians, joint workplace ethical training, and modifications to the Care Certificate. Implementation of these measures should be monitored carefully and the results published to augment our existing knowledge of moral distress in healthcare assistants. Conclusion: This analysis establishes the need for more research and discussion on this topic. Future research should focus on evaluating the effectiveness of the proposed recommendations. (shrink)
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  26. Moral distress in undergraduate nursing students.Simoní Saraiva Bordignon, Valéria Lerch Lunardi, Edison Luiz Devos Barlem, Graziele de Lima Dalmolin, Rosemary Silva da Silveira, Flávia Regina Souza Ramos & Jamila Geri Tomaschewski Barlem - 2019 - Nursing Ethics 26 (7-8):2325-2339.
    Background:Moral distress is considered to be the negative feelings that arise when one knows the morally correct response to a situation but cannot act because of institutional or hierarchal constraints.Objectives:To analyze moral distress and its relation with sociodemographic and academic variables in undergraduate students from different universities in Brazil.Method:Quantitative study with a cross-sectional design. Data were collected through the Moral Distress Scale for Nursing Students, with 499 nursing students from three universities in the extreme (...)
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  27. A Broader Understanding of Moral Distress.Stephen M. Campbell, Connie Ulrich & Christine Grady - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (12):2-9.
    On the traditional view, moral distress arises only in cases where an individual believes she knows the morally right thing to do but fails to perform that action due to various constraints. We seek to motivate a broader understanding of moral distress. We begin by presenting six types of distress that fall outside the bounds of the traditional definition and explaining why they should be recognized as forms of moral distress. We then propose (...)
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  28.  15
    Moral distress experienced by psychiatric nurses in Japan.Kayoko Ohnishi, Yasuko Ohgushi, Masataka Nakano, Hirohide Fujii, Hiromi Tanaka, Kazuyo Kitaoka, Jun Nakahara & Yugo Narita - 2010 - Nursing Ethics 17 (6):726-740.
    This study aimed to: (1) develop and evaluate the Moral Distress Scale for Psychiatric nurses (MDS-P); (2) use the MDS-P to examine the moral distress experienced by Japanese psychiatric nurses; and (3) explore the correlation between moral distress and burnout. A questionnaire on the intensity and frequency of moral distress items (the MDS-P: 15 items grouped into three factors), a burnout scale (Maslach Burnout Inventory — General Survey) and demographic questions were administered (...)
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  29.  27
    Rethinking moral distress: conceptual demands for a troubling phenomenon affecting health care professionals.Daniel W. Tigard - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (4):479-488.
    Recent medical and bioethics literature shows a growing concern for practitioners’ emotional experience and the ethical environment in the workplace. Moral distress, in particular, is often said to result from the difficult decisions made and the troubling situations regularly encountered in health care contexts. It has been identified as a leading cause of professional dissatisfaction and burnout, which, in turn, contribute to inadequate attention and increased pain for patients. Given the natural desire to avoid these negative effects, it (...)
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  30. Moral Distress in Healthcare.Judith Andre - 2002 - Bioethics Forum 18 (1-2):44-46.
    Moral distress is the sense that one must do, or cooperate in, what is wrong. It is paradigmatically faced by nurses, but it is almost a universal occupational hazard.
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  31.  24
    Moral distress among Norwegian doctors.R. Forde & O. G. Aasland - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (7):521-525.
    Background: Medicine is full of value conflicts. Limited resources and legal regulations may place doctors in difficult ethical dilemmas and cause moral distress. Research on moral distress has so far been mainly studied in nurses. Objective: To describe whether Norwegian doctors experience stress related to ethical dilemmas and lack of resources, and to explore whether the doctors feel that they have good strategies for the resolution of ethical dilemmas. Design: Postal survey of a representative sample of (...)
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  32.  1
    Moral Distress as a Symptom of Dirty Hands.Daniel Tigard - 2019 - Res Publica 25 (3):353-371.
    The experience of ‘moral distress’ is an increasing focal point of contemporary medical and bioethics literature, yet it has received little attention in discussions intersecting with ethical theory. This is unfortunate, as it seems that the peculiar phenomenon may well help us to better understand a number of issues bearing both practical and theoretical significance. In this article, I provide a robust psychological profile of moral distress in order to shed a newfound light upon the longstanding (...)
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  33.  25
    Measuring Moral Distress in Pharmacy and Clinical Practice.Sofia Kälvemark Sporrong, Anna T. Höglund & Bengt Arnetz - 2006 - Nursing Ethics 13 (4):416-427.
    This article presents the development, validation and application of an instrument to measure everyday moral distress in different health care settings. The concept of moral distress has been discussed and developed over 20 years. A few instruments have been developed to measure it, predominantly in nursing. The instrument presented here consists of two factors: level of moral distress, and tolerance/openness towards moral dilemmas. It was tested in four medical departments and three pharmacies, where (...)
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  34.  21
    Moral distress in nurses in oncology and haematology units.M. Lazzarin, A. Biondi & S. Di Mauro - 2012 - Nursing Ethics 19 (2):183-195.
    One of the difficulties nurses experience in clinical practice in relation to ethical issues in connection with young oncology patients is moral distress. In this descriptive correlational study, the Moral Distress Scale-Paediatric Version (MDS-PV) was translated from the original language and tested on a conventional sample of nurses working in paediatric oncology and haematology wards, in six north paediatric hospitals of Italy. 13.7% of the total respondents claimed that they had changed unit or hospital due to (...)
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  35.  5
    Moral distress interventions: An integrative literature review.Vanessa K. Amos & Elizabeth Epstein - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):582-607.
    Moral distress has been well reviewed in the literature with established deleterious side effects for all healthcare professionals, including nurses, physicians, and others. Yet, little is known about the quality and effectiveness of interventions directed to address moral distress. The aim of this integrative review is to analyze published intervention studies to determine their efficacy and applicability across hospital settings. Of the initial 1373 articles discovered in October 2020, 18 were appraised as relevant, with 1 study (...)
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  36.  33
    Moral Distress: Inability to Act or Discomfort with Moral Subjectivity?Mark Repenshek - 2009 - Nursing Ethics 16 (6):734-742.
    Amidst the wealth of literature on the topic of moral distress in nursing, a single citation is ubiquitous, Andrew Jameton’s 1984 book Nursing practice. The definition Jameton formulated reads ‘... moral distress arises when one knows the right thing to do, but institutional constraints make it nearly impossible to pursue the right course of action’. Unfortunately, it appears that, despite the frequent use of Jameton’s definition of moral distress, the definition itself remains uncritically examined. (...)
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  37.  2
    Addressing Moral Distress: lessons Learnt from a Non-Interventional Longitudinal Study on Moral Distress.Trisha M. Prentice, Dilini I. Imbulana, Lynn Gillam, Peter G. Davis & Annie Janvier - 2022 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 13 (4):226-236.
    Moral distress is prevalent within the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and can negatively affect clinicians. Studies have evaluated the causes of moral distress and interventions to mitigate it...
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  38.  23
    Moral distress: A review of the argument-based nursing ethics literature. [REVIEW]J. McCarthy & C. Gastmans - 2015 - Nursing Ethics 22 (1):131-152.
  39.  11
    Parental Moral Distress and Moral Schism in the Neonatal ICU.Gabriella Foe, Jonathan Hellmann & Rebecca A. Greenberg - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):319-325.
    Ethical dilemmas in critical care may cause healthcare practitioners to experience moral distress: incoherence between what one believes to be best and what occurs. Given that paediatric decision-making typically involves parents, we propose that parents can also experience moral distress when faced with making value-laden decisions in the neonatal intensive care unit. We propose a new concept—that parents may experience “moral schism”—a genuine uncertainty regarding a value-based decision that is accompanied by emotional distress. Schism, (...)
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  40.  56
    Framing the Issues: Moral Distress in Health Care. [REVIEW]Bernadette M. Pauly, Colleen Varcoe & Jan Storch - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (1):1-11.
    Moral distress in health care has been identified as a growing concern and a focus of research in nursing and health care for almost three decades. Researchers and theorists have argued that moral distress has both short and long-term consequences. Moral distress has implications for satisfaction, recruitment and retention of health care providers and implications for the delivery of safe and competent quality patient care. In over a decade of research on ethical practice, registered (...)
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  41. Moral distress.Caroline Ong - 2015 - Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 20 (4):12.
    Ong, Caroline As health systems become more complex, moral distress is increasingly being recognised as a significant phenomenon amongst health professionals. It can be described as the state of being distressed when one is unable to act according to what one believes to be morally right. It may compromise patient care, the health professional involved and the organisation. Cumulative experiences of incompletely resolved moral distress - a phenomenon which is called moral residue - may leave (...)
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  42.  44
    Moral distress experienced by nurses: A quantitative literature review.Younjae Oh & Chris Gastmans - 2015 - Nursing Ethics 22 (1):15-31.
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  43.  6
    Moral Distress and Austerity: An Avoidable Ethical Challenge in Healthcare.Georgina Morley, Jonathan Ives & Caroline Bradbury-Jones - 2019 - Health Care Analysis 27 (3):185-201.
    Austerity, by its very nature, imposes constraints by limiting the options for action available to us because certain courses of action are too costly or insufficiently cost effective. In the context of healthcare, the constraints imposed by austerity come in various forms; ranging from the availability of certain treatments being reduced or withdrawn completely, to reductions in staffing that mean healthcare professionals must ration the time they make available to each patient. As austerity has taken hold, across the United Kingdom (...)
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  44.  7
    Moral distress among critical care nurses: A cross-cultural comparison.Kaoru Ashida, Tetsuharu Kawashima, Aki Kawakami & Makoto Tanaka - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (6):1341-1352.
    Background Although, moral distress presents a serious problem among critical care nurses in many countries, limited research has been conducted on it. A validated scale has been developed to evaluate moral distress and has enabled cross-cultural comparison for seeking its root causes. Research aims This study aimed to (1) clarify the current status of moral distress among nurses who worked in critical care areas in Japan, (2) compare the moral distress levels among (...)
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  45.  34
    'Moral distress' - time to abandon a flawed nursing construct?M. -J. Johnstone & A. Hutchinson - 2015 - Nursing Ethics 22 (1):5-14.
  46. Moral distress, moral residue, and the crescendo effect.Elizabeth Gingell Epstein & Ann Baile Hamric - 2009 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 20 (4):330.
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  47.  37
    Moral Distress in Uninsured Health Care.Anita Nivens & Janet Buelow - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):123-125.
  48.  13
    Moral distress among nursing and non-nursing students.Lillian M. Range & Alicia L. Rotherham - 2010 - Nursing Ethics 17 (2):225-232.
    Their nursing experience and/or training may lead students preparing for the nursing profession to have less moral distress and more favorable attitudes towards a hastened death compared with those preparing for other fields of study. To ascertain if this was true, 66 undergraduates (54 women, 9 men, 3 not stated) in southeastern USA completed measures of moral distress and attitudes towards hastening death. Unexpectedly, the results from nursing and non-nursing majors were not significantly different. All the (...)
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  49.  58
    Empirical Research on Moral Distress: Issues, Challenges, and Opportunities. [REVIEW]Ann B. Hamric - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (1):39-49.
    Abstract Studying a concept as complex as moral distress is an ongoing challenge for those engaged in empirical ethics research. Qualitative studies of nurses have illuminated the experience of moral distress and widened the contours of the concept, particularly in the area of root causes. This work has led to the current understanding that moral distress can arise from clinical situations, factors internal to the individual professional, and factors present in unit cultures, the institution, (...)
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    Moral distress in critical care nursing.Natalie Susan McAndrew, Jane Leske & Kathryn Schroeter - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301666497.
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