26 found
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  1.  40
    Moral Distress Reexamined: A Feminist Interpretation of Nurses' Identities, Relationships, and Responsibilites. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Peter & Joan Liaschenko - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):337-345.
    Moral distress has been written about extensively in nursing and other fields. Often, however, it has not been used with much theoretical depth. This paper focuses on theorizing moral distress using feminist ethics, particularly the work of Margaret Urban Walker and Hilde Lindemann. Incorporating empirical findings, we argue that moral distress is the response to constraints experienced by nurses to their moral identities, responsibilities, and relationships. We recommend that health professionals get assistance in accounting for and communicating their values and (...)
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  2.  24
    Perils of Proximity: A Spatiotemporal Analysis of Moral Distress and Moral Ambiguity.Elizabeth Peter & Joan Liaschenko - 2004 - Nursing Inquiry 11 (4):218-225.
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  3.  10
    Relational Influences on Experiences with Assisted Dying: A Scoping Review.Caroline Variath, Elizabeth Peter, Lisa Cranley, Dianne Godkin & Danielle Just - 2020 - Nursing Ethics 27 (7):1501-1516.
    Background: Family members and healthcare providers play an integral role in a person’s assisted dying journey. Their own needs during the assisted dying journey are often, however, unrecognized and underrepresented in policies and guidelines. Circumstances under which people choose assisted dying, and relational contexts such as the sociopolitical environment, may influence the experiences of family members and healthcare providers. Ethical considerations: Ethics approval was not required to conduct this review. Aim: This scoping review aims to identify the relational influences on (...)
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  4.  14
    The Advocacy Role of Nurses in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.Verónica Tíscar-González, Montserrat Gea-Sánchez, Joan Blanco-Blanco, María Teresa Moreno-Casbas & Elizabeth Peter - 2020 - Nursing Ethics 27 (2):333-347.
    Background:The decision whether to initiate cardiopulmonary resuscitation may sometimes be ethically complex. While studies have addressed some of these issues, along with the role of nurses in cardiopulmonary resuscitation, most have not considered the importance of nurses acting as advocates for their patients with respect to cardiopulmonary resuscitation.Research objective:To explore what the nurse’s advocacy role is in cardiopulmonary resuscitation from the perspective of patients, relatives, and health professionals in the Basque Country.Research design:An exploratory critical qualitative study was conducted from October (...)
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  5.  6
    Advance Care Planning with Chronically Ill Patients: A Relational Autonomy Approach.Tieghan Killackey, Elizabeth Peter, Jane Maciver & Shan Mohammed - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301984803.
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  6.  15
    Fostering Nurses’ Moral Agency and Moral Identity:The Importance of Moral Community.Joan Liaschenko & Elizabeth Peter - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (S1):S18-S21.
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  7.  3
    The Process of Moral Distress Development: A Virtue Ethics Perspective.Carolina S. Caram, Elizabeth Peter, Flávia R. S. Ramos & Maria J. M. Brito - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):402-412.
    This theoretical paper proposes a new perspective to understand the moral distress of nurses more fully, using virtue ethics. Moral distress is a widely studied subject, especially with respect to the determination of its causes and manifestations. Increasing the theoretical depth of previous work using ethical theory, however, can create new possibilities for moral distress to be explored and analyzed. Drawing on more recent work in this field, we explicate the conceptual framework of the process of moral distress in nurses, (...)
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  8.  12
    Nurses’ Narratives of Moral Identity.Elizabeth Peter, Anne Simmonds & Joan Liaschenko - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301664820.
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  9.  35
    Sustaining Hope as a Moral Competency in the Context of Aggressive Care.Elizabeth Peter, Shan Mohammed & Anne Simmonds - 2015 - Nursing Ethics 22 (7):743-753.
    -/- Background: Nurses who provide aggressive care often experience the ethical challenge of needing to preserve the hope of seriously ill patients and their families without providing false hope. -/- Research objectives: The purpose of this inquiry was to explore nurses’ moral competence related to fostering hope in patients and their families within the context of aggressive technological care. A secondary purpose was to understand how this competence is shaped by the social–moral space of nurses’ work in order to capture (...)
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  10.  16
    Choosing Nursing as a Career: A Narrative Analysis of Millennial Nurses' Career Choice of Virtue.Sheri Lynn Price, Linda McGillis Hall, Jan E. Angus & Elizabeth Peter - 2013 - Nursing Inquiry 20 (4):305-316.
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  11.  29
    Rituals, Death and the Moral Practice of Medical Futility.Shan Mohammed & Elizabeth Peter - 2009 - Nursing Ethics 16 (3):292-302.
    Medical futility is often defined as providing inappropriate treatments that will not improve disease prognosis, alleviate physiological symptoms, or prolong survival. This understanding of medical futility is problematic because it rests on the final outcomes of procedures that are narrow and medically defined. In this article, Walker's `expressivecollaborative' model of morality is used to examine how certain critical care interventions that are considered futile actually have broader social functions surrounding death and dying. By examining cardiopulmonary resuscitation and life-sustaining intensive care (...)
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  12.  20
    Advancing the Concept of Moral Distress.Elizabeth Peter - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):293-295.
  13.  1
    An Examination of the Moral Habitability of Resource-Constrained Obstetrical Settings.Priscilla N. Boakye, Elizabeth Peter, Anne Simmonds & Solina Richter - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973302098831.
    Background: While there have been studies exploring moral habitability and its impact on the work environments of nurses in Western countries, little is known about the moral habitability of the work environments of nurses and midwives in resource-constrained settings. Research objective: The purpose of this research was to examine the moral habitability of the work environment of nurses and midwives in Ghana and its influence on their moral agency using the philosophical works of Margaret Urban Walker. Research design and participants: (...)
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  14.  17
    The History of Nursing in the Home: Revealing the Significance of Place in the Expression of Moral Agency.Elizabeth Peter - 2002 - Nursing Inquiry 9 (2):65-72.
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  15.  3
    The Medicalisation of the Dying Self: The Search for Life Extension in Advanced Cancer.Shan Mohammed, Elizabeth Peter, Denise Gastaldo & Doris Howell - 2020 - Nursing Inquiry 27 (1).
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  16.  14
    Explorations of a Trust Approach for Nursing Ethics.Elizabeth Peter & Kathryn Pauly Morgan - 2001 - Nursing Inquiry 8 (1):3-10.
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  17.  26
    Whose Morality is It Anyway? Thoughts on the Work of Margaret Urban Walker.Elizabeth Peter & Joan Liaschenko - 2003 - Nursing Philosophy 4 (3):259-262.
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  18.  10
    Invisibility of the Self: Reaching for the Telos of Nursing Within a Context of Moral Distress.Carolina S. Caram, Elizabeth Peter & Maria J. M. Brito - 2019 - Nursing Inquiry 26 (1):e12269.
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  19.  9
    A Very Human Being: Sister Marie Simone Roach, 1922-2016.Michael J. Villeneuve, Verena Tschudin, Janet Storch, Marsha D. M. Fowler & Elizabeth Peter - 2016 - Nursing Inquiry 23 (4):283-289.
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  20. Nurses’ Experiences of Ethical Responsibilities of Care During the COVID-19 Pandemic.Elizabeth Peter, Shan Mohammed, Tieghan Killackey, Jane MacIver & Caroline Variath - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (4):844-857.
    Background The COVID-19 pandemic has forced rapid and widespread change to standards of patient care and nursing practice, inevitably leading to unprecedented shifts in the moral conditions of nursing work. Less is known about how these challenges have affected nurses’ capacity to meet their ethical responsibilities and what has helped to sustain their efforts to continue to care. Research objectives 1) To explore nurses’ experiences of striving to fulfill their ethical responsibilities of care during the COVID-19 pandemic and 2) to (...)
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  21.  17
    New Perspectives on the End of Life.Ian Kerridge, Paul A. Komesaroff, Malcolm Parker & Elizabeth Peter - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (3):269-270.
  22.  1
    An Umbilical Cord Around Women’s Necks.Marsha D. Fowler, Patricia Benner, Peggy L. Chinn, Pamela Grace, Elizabeth Peter, Liz Stokes & Martha Turner - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (4):783-786.
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  23.  11
    Containing Anxiety in the Wake of the H1N1 Influenza Pandemic: Documents as Sedative Agents.Elizabeth Peter & Horatio Bot - 2009 - Nursing Inquiry 16 (4):273-274.
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  24.  6
    Instrumentalisation of the Health System: An Examination of the Impact on Nursing Practice and Patient Autonomy.Jesús Molina-Mula, Elizabeth Peter, Julia Gallo-Estrada & Catalina Perelló-Campaner - 2018 - Nursing Inquiry 25 (1):e12201.
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  25.  28
    The Voice of Home Care Workers in Clinical Ethics.Joan Liaschenko & Elizabeth Peter - 2002 - HEC Forum 14 (3):217-223.
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  26.  1
    Health Care Providers’ Ethical Perspectives on Waiver of Final Consent for Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD): A Qualitative Study.Dianne Godkin, Lisa Cranley, Elizabeth Peter & Caroline Variath - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1):1-14.
    BackgroundWith the enactment of Bill C-7 in Canada in March 2021, people who are eligible for medical assistance in dying, whose death is reasonably foreseeable and are at risk of losing decision-making capacity, may enter into a written agreement with their healthcare provider to waive the final consent requirement at the time of provision. This study explored healthcare providers’ perspectives on honouring eligible patients’ request for MAiD in the absence of a contemporaneous consent following their loss of decision-making capacity. MethodA (...)
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