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Jean Harvey [16]Jean-Charles Harvey [1]Jean-François Harvey [1]
  1.  10
    Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory.Sandra Lee Bartky, Paul Benson, Sue Campbell, Claudia Card, Robin S. Dillon, Jean Harvey, Karen Jones, Charles W. Mills, James Lindemann Nelson, Margaret Urban Walker, Rebecca Whisnant & Catherine Wilson (eds.) - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Moral psychology studies the features of cognition, judgement, perception and emotion that make human beings capable of moral action. Perspectives from feminist and race theory immensely enrich moral psychology. Writers who take these perspectives ask questions about mind, feeling, and action in contexts of social difference and unequal power and opportunity. These essays by a distinguished international cast of philosophers explore moral psychology as it connects to social life, scientific studies, and literature.
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  2. Moral Solidarity and Empathetic Understanding: The Moral Value and Scope of the Relationship.Jean Harvey - 2007 - Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (1):22–37.
  3. Victims, Resistance, and Civilized Oppression.Jean Harvey - 2010 - Journal of Social Philosophy 41 (1):13-27.
  4.  5
    Beyond Separate Emergence: A Systems View of Team Learning Climate.Jean-François Harvey, Pierre-Marc Leblanc & Matthew A. Cronin - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  5. The Eternal Struggle.Jean-Charles Harvey - 1943 - Toronto, Can., Forward Publishing Company.
     
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  6.  30
    Authentic Social Justice and the Far Reaches of “The Private Sphere”.Jean Harvey - 2010 - Social Philosophy Today 26:9-22.
    The one sphere of life where a claimed right to privacy is most sympathetically received is in the inner realm of the mind. I will look briefly at Joseph Tussman’s claim that a government is not only entitled but morally required to be concerned with and involved in the minds of the nation’s citizens. I then further explore reasons why the realm of the mind matters not only morally but politically. There are consequentialist reasons, but more interestingly there are non-consequentialist (...)
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  7.  27
    Prestige, Power, and International Relations.Jean Harvey - 2013 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 20 (2):1-13.
    Paradigm cases of national power usually focus on material assets: military or economic power, natural resources etc. This article, though, considers a less "material" kind of national power: "relationship power" and "interactive power" that nations have when accorded a high prestige ranking. This is a more subtle type of power than that attached to material assets. But it is highly effective, even though trivialized and overlooked in international debate. This form of power can be more dangerous than it appears. And (...)
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  8.  34
    The Burden of Securing Social Justice: Institutions, Individuals, and Moral Action.Jean Harvey - 2006 - Social Philosophy Today 22:137-152.
    It is a commonsense view held by many citizens in democratic nations that whether or not a society is socially just depends on the nature of these major institutions and their functioning. On this view, social justice is so to with what philosophers have referred to as “realized, rather than abstract, institutions,” rather than, say, individual character or actions. I will examine one sensible sounding argument in support of this view, which I will call “The Effects Argument.” It is deceptively (...)
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  9.  14
    Gratitude, Obligation, and Individualism.Jean Harvey - 2004 - In Peggy DesAutels & Margaret Urban Walker (eds.), Moral Psychology: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 33.
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  10.  20
    The Burden of Securing Social Justice: Institutions, Individuals, and Moral Action.Jean Harvey - 2006 - Social Philosophy Today 22:137-152.
    It is a commonsense view held by many citizens in democratic nations that whether or not a society is socially just depends on the nature of these major institutions and their functioning. On this view, social justice is so to with what philosophers have referred to as “realized, rather than abstract, institutions,” rather than, say, individual character or actions. I will examine one sensible sounding argument in support of this view, which I will call “The Effects Argument.” It is deceptively (...)
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  11.  59
    Companion and Assistance Animals: Benefits, Welfare Safeguards, and Relationships.Jean Harvey - 2008 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (2):161-176.
    This paper examines one approach to the ethics of companion animals, which emerges from the dominant historical tradition and is increasingly familiar in everyday life as well as in work on companion animals in the social sciences. I label it the “utilization with welfare-safeguards” model, or, more gently worded, “seeking benefits while ensuring welfare.” Some of the “benefits” considered are complex ones and others simpler. I explore several problems involved in this approach. I then offer an alternative account where the (...)
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  12.  22
    Beyond Policy and Law: Human Security and the Realm of the Informal.Jean Harvey - 2014 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (1):1-17.
    In recent decades governments around the world have been increasingly concerned about terrorism and have introduced new laws and policies in an attempt to combat it. I examine here the weakest link in chains of security management: what I call the realm of “the informal,” where neither law nor formal policy is at work, but where stereotypes, traditional sayings and jokes, social ideals often promoted by mass media, etiquette requirements certainly are. This realm is so dangerous precisely because of its (...)
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