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  1. THE SPECTACLE OF REFLECTION: ON DREAMS, NEURAL NETWORKS AND THE VISUAL NATURE OF THOUGHT.Magdalena Szalewicz - manuscript
    The article considers the problem of images and the role they play in our reflection turning to evidence provided by two seemingly very distant theories of mind together with two sorts of corresponding visions: dreams as analyzed by Freud who claimed that they are pictures of our thoughts, and their mechanical counterparts produced by neural networks designed for object recognition and classification. Freud’s theory of dreams has largely been ignored by philosophers interested in cognition, most of whom focused solely on (...)
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  2. Imagining a Way Out of Dream Skepticism.Daniel Gregory - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-18.
    The problem of dream skepticism – i.e., the problem of what can justify one’s belief that they are not dreaming – is one of the most famous problems in philosophy. I propose a way of responding to the problem which is available if one subscribes to the theory that the sensory experiences that we have in dreams consist of images (as opposed to false percepts). The response exploits a particular feature of imagination, viz., that it is not possible to simultaneously (...)
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  3. Are dream emotions fitting?Melanie Rosen & Marina Trakas - 2024 - Philosophical Psychology:1-31.
    When we dream, we feel emotions in response to objects and events that exist only in the dream. One key question is whether these emotions can be said to be “essentially unfitting”, that is, always inappropriate to the evoking scenario. However, how we evaluate dream emotions for fittingness may depend on the model of dreams we adopt: the imagination or the hallucination model. If fittingness requires a match between emotion and evaluative properties of objects or events, it is prima facie (...)
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  4. Entra nei miei sogni. Recensione di G. Grossi, La notte dei simulacri. Sogno, cinema, realtà virtuale, Johan & Levy, Monza 2021. [REVIEW]Giulia Andreini - 2022 - Cinergie 22:207-209.
  5. Entra nei miei sogni. Recensione di G. Grossi, La notte dei simulacri. Sogno, cinema, realtà virtuale, Johan & Levy, Monza 2021. [REVIEW]Giulia Andreini - 2022 - Cinergie 22:207-209.
  6. Does what we dream feel present? Two varieties of presence and implications for measuring presence in VR.Michael Barkasi - 2020 - Synthese 199 (1-2):2525-2551.
    What’s presented in our normal waking perceptual visual experiences feels present to us, while what we “see” in pictures and imagine does not. What about dreams? Does what we “see” in a dream feel present? Jennifer Windt has argued for an affirmative answer, for all dreams. But the dreams which flow from the brain’s registration of myoclonic twitches present a challenge to this answer. During these dreams motion-guiding vision is shut off, and, as Mohan Matthen has argued, motion-guiding vision seems (...)
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  7. Some hallucinations are experiences of the past.Michael Barkasi - 2020 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 101 (3):454-488.
    When you hallucinate an object, you are not in the normal sort of concurrent causal sensory interaction with that object. It's standardly further inferred that the hallucinated object does not actually exist. But the lack of normal concurrent causal sensory interaction does not imply that there does not exist an object that is hallucinated. It might be a past‐perceived object. In this paper, I argue that this claim holds for at least some interesting cases of hallucination. Hallucinations generated by misleading (...)
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  8. Imagination, Dreaming, and Hallucination.Jonathan Jenkins Ichikawa - 2016 - In Amy Kind (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Imagination. New York: Routledge. pp. 149-62.
  9. Composition and replay of mnemonic sequences: The contributions of REM and slow-wave sleep to episodic memory.Sen Cheng & Markus Werning - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (6):610-611.
    We propose that rapid eye movement (REM) and slow-wave sleep contribute differently to the formation of episodic memories. REM sleep is important for building up invariant object representations that eventually recur to gamma-band oscillations in the neocortex. In contrast, slow-wave sleep is more directly involved in the consolidation of episodic memories through replay of sequential neural activity in hippocampal place cells.
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  10. 心理学入门 [Xin Li Xue Ru Men] / Chinese translation of Dreams of Wholeness.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2010 - Guilin: Guangxi Normal University Press.
    Published as Book Two of the Philopsychy Trilogy; translated by Zhai Pengxiao.
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  11. The immersive spatiotemporal hallucination model of dreaming.Jennifer M. Windt - 2010 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (2):295-316.
    The paper proposes a minimal definition of dreaming in terms of immersive spatiotemporal hallucination (ISTH) occurring in sleep or during sleep–wake transitions and under the assumption of reportability. I take these conditions to be both necessary and sufficient for dreaming to arise. While empirical research results may, in the future, allow for an extension of the concept of dreaming beyond sleep and possibly even independently of reportability, ISTH is part of any possible extension of this definition and thus is a (...)
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  12. Dreaming and imagination.Jonathan Ichikawa - 2009 - Mind and Language 24 (1):103-121.
    What is it like to dream? On an orthodox view, dreams involve misleading sensations and false beliefs. I argue, on philosophical, psychological, and neurophysiological grounds, that orthodoxy about dreaming should be rejected in favor of an imagination model of dreaming. I am thus in partial agreement with Colin McGinn, who has argued that we do not have misleading sensory experiences while dreaming, and partially in agreement with Ernest Sosa, who has argued that we do not form false beliefs while dreaming. (...)
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  13. Imagination and epistemology.Jonathan Ichikawa - 2008 - Dissertation, Rutgers University
    Among the tools the epistemologist brings to the table ought to be, I suggest, a firm understanding of the imagination--one that is informed by philosophy of mind, cognitive psychology, and neuroscience. In my dissertation, I highlight several ways in which such an understanding of the imagination can yield insight into traditional questions in epistemology. My dissertation falls into three parts. In Part I, I argue that dreaming should be understood in imaginative terms, and that this has important implications for questions (...)
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  14. Escape from the dark forest: the experimentalist standpoint of Sante De Sanctis' psychology of dreams.Giovanni Pietro Lombardo & Renato Foschi - 2008 - History of the Human Sciences 21 (3):45-69.
    Sante De Sanctis (1862—1935), a pioneer of psychology in Rome at the end of the 19th century, applied methods from the expanding field of experimental psychology to the study of dreams, which was considered one of the leading ways to gain an understanding of normal and pathological psychic life. Taking inspiration from several traditions, De Sanctis proposed a study that anticipated a scientific program that also differentiated between contemporary psychoanalytical interpretations according to which previous dream psychology was considered a 'dark (...)
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  15. Dreaming Souls: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind.Owen Flanagan - 2000 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    What, if anything, do dreams tell us about ourselves? What is the relationship between types of sleep and types of dreams? Does dreaming serve any purpose? Or are dreams simply meaningless mental noise--"unmusical fingers wandering over the piano keys"? With expertise in philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience, Owen Flanagan is uniquely qualified to answer these questions. In this groundbreaking work, he provides both an accessible survey of the latest research on sleep and dreams and a compelling new theory about the nature (...)
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  16. Dreaming Souls: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind.Owen J. Flanagan - 2000 - Oup Usa.
    In Dreaming Souls, Owen Flanagan provides both an accessible survey of the latest research on sleep and dreams and a compelling new theory about the nature and function of dreaming. Flanagan argues that while sleep has a clear biological function and adaptive value, dreams are merely side effects, 'free-riders', irrelevant from an evolutionary point of view. But dreams are hardly unimportant. Indeed, Flanagan argues that dreams are self-expressive, the result of our need to find or create meaning, even when we (...)
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  17. The reality of dreams.Oswald Hanfling - 1998 - Philosophical Investigations 21 (4):338-344.
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  18. Deconstructing dreams: The spandrels of sleep.Owen Flanagan - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):5-27.
  19. Mental Activity in Dreams.Kathleen Emmett - 1983 - der 16. Weltkongress Für Philosophie 2:458-465.
    Many philosophers have argued that dreams cannot be conscious states since they occur during sleep. Some wish to identify dreams with only what we remember of them and, discounting the reliability of memory, also discount dreams. I will argue that access to dreaming is not limited to our waking memories of them. Dreaming is similar to other marginal or altered states of consciousness, and as such can be held to involve consciousness even when we do not remember dreams.
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  20. Oneiric experiences.Kathleen Emmett - 1978 - Philosophical Studies 34 (November):445-50.
  21. Are Dreams Experiences?Daniel C. Dennett - 1976 - Philosophical Review 85 (2):151.
  22. The concept of dreaming.Norman Malcolm - 1967 - In Harold Morick (ed.), Wittgenstein and the Problem of Other Minds. [Brighton], Sussex: Humanities Press.
  23. Malcolm and the criterion of sleep.Robert L. Caldwell - 1965 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 43 (3):339-352.
  24. What dreams are made of.Charles S. Chihara - 1965 - Theoria 31 (3):145-58.
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  25. Professor Malcolm on dreams.A. J. Ayer - 1960 - Journal of Philosophy 57 (August):517-534.
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  26. Dreaming.Norman Malcolm - 1959 - Routledge and Kegan Paul.
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  27. Published in Skeptical Inquirer 1991, 15, 362-370.Susan Blackmore - unknown
    What could it mean to be conscious in your dreams? For most of us, dreaming is something quite separate from normal life. When we wake up from being chased by a ferocious tiger, or seduced by a devastatingly good-looking Nobel Prize winner we realize with relief or disappointment that "it was only a dream.".
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  28. The Dreams of Alpha-Lupi: A Trip In Virtual Reality.Francisco Valdez - manuscript
    Dreams as Virtual Reality simulations. When David Chalmers wrote “The Virtual and the Real” the argument many focused on the metaphysical and epistemic nature Virtual Reality and how it compares to waking states and dreaming sates. But one interesting segment of the paper is where he defends his thesis by claiming that dreams are not experiences. This is where I take issue and, in my paper, I claim that dreams as much as VR are epistemically similar enough to be called (...)
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  29. Dreams and Dreaming.Jennifer Windt - unknown