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Lee A. McBride [4]Lee McBride [3]
  1.  33
    Discernment behind Asylum Walls; Or, The Limits of Efficacious Reasoning.Lee McBride - 2023 - In Jacoby Adeshei Carter & Darryl Scriven (eds.), Insurrectionist Ethics. Radical Perspectives on Social Justice. Palgrave. pp. 237-251.
    This chapter offers a discussion of Leonard Harris’ insurrectionist philosophy, paying special attention to those places where Harris attenuates the capability and scope of human reasoning. The chapter critically engages: claims to divine reasoning, conceptual approaches to racism that rely upon totalizing accounts, the prominent conception of modernity, the notion that human apperception is unaffected by the episteme (i.e., intervening background assumptions that pervade the present epoch), and the notion that Harris’ philosophy precludes us from establishing moral imperatives and value (...)
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  2.  11
    Food, Focal Practices, and Decolonial Agrarianism.Lee A. McBride - 2023 - In Samantha Noll & Zachary Piso (eds.), Paul B. Thompson's Philosophy of Agriculture: Fields, Farmers, Forks, and Food. Springer Verlag. pp. 131-143.
    Agrarianism, according to Paul B. Thompson, is an environmental philosophy focused on agriculture and the nurturing of food, fuel, and fiber. Agrarianism hopes to re-establish our fundamental connection to the land, helping us approach a tenable understanding of sustainability. Thompson enlists Albert Borgmann’s notion of “focal practices” to discuss farming and the culture of the table. With this comes a critique of “the device paradigm,” the modern technological way of life that alienates us from quotidian beauty, lifecycles and seasonality, and (...)
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  3.  67
    Collectivistic Individualism: Dewey and MacIntyre.Lee A. McBride - 2006 - Contemporary Pragmatism 3 (1):69-83.
    John Dewey and Alasdair MacIntyre are seldom considered philosophically compatible. Yet, both critique contemporary liberalism by focusing on the pervasiveness of atomistic, pecuniary, laissez-faire individualism. I argue that Dewey and MacIntyre have not abandoned individualism as much as reconstructed the concept. Dewey's and MacIntyre's conceptions of human flourishing rely on a nuanced conception of individualism, which I term "collectivistic individualism.".
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  4.  23
    Race, Multiplicity, and Impure Coalitions of Resistance.Lee A. McBride - 2024 - In Jacoby A. Carter and Hernando A. Estévez (ed.), Philosophizing the Americas. pp. 284-303.
    Lucius Outlaw and Shannon Sullivan have argued for the preservation of racial distinctiveness and the necessity of racial separatism. This paper articulates and challenges this push for racial separatism and the particular conception of race evoked therein. The author points out that the multiplicity, the multiculturalism, the intersectionality within these communities of resistance is typically belittled, fragmented, or erased. Recognizing the practical use of racial coalitions to combat racism, the author articulates an alternative conception of coalitional agency, one that allows (...)
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  5.  31
    Pragmatism and Insurrectionist Philosophy.Lee McBride - 2022 - In Scott F. Aikin & Robert B. Talisse (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Pragmatism. Routledge. pp. 358-365.
    This chapter aims to articulate the motivation behind an insurrectionist philosophy. On this account, insurrectionist philosophy is about rejecting a world (and its norms and intervening background assumptions) and creating the possibility for transvaluation or a radical revolution of values. To shed light on this, McBride offers an account of Leonard Harris’s idiosyncratic philosophy born of strife and struggle, clarifying the role of Alain Locke’s critical pragmatism and the insurrectionist spirit needed to disavow the conventional norms and the intervening background (...)
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  6.  23
    New Descriptions, New Possibilities.Lee A. McBride - 2018 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 32 (1):168-178.
    ABSTRACT In “Race, Multiculturalism, and Democracy,” Robert Gooding-Williams offers an insight. He writes: “Our sense of ourselves and of the possibilities existing for us is, to a significant degree, a function of the descriptions we have available to us to conceptualize our intended actions and prospective lives…. ‘Hence if new modes of description come into being, new possibilities of action come into being in consequence.’” In this article, I discuss the philosopher's role in the articulation of new descriptions and thus (...)
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  7.  41
    Pragmatist Feminism and the Work of Charlene Haddock Seigfried.Lee McBride & Erin McKenna (eds.) - 2022 - London, UK: Bloomsbury Publishing.
    A contemporary appraisal of the breadth, significance, and legacy of the work of Charlene Haddock Seigfried, this book brings together writings focused on pragmatist feminism/feminist pragmatism, contemporary pragmatism, William James and the reconstruction of philosophy, education and American philosophy in the 21st century. Charlene Haddock Seigfried is a looming figure in American thought and feminist theory who coined the phrase 'pragmatist feminist' which has become an increasingly important concept in contemporary philosophy. Haddock Siegfried argues that pragmatism and its rich history (...)
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