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Lawrence Busch
Michigan State University
  1.  31
    The Private Governance of Food: Equitable Exchange or Bizarre Bazaar? [REVIEW]Lawrence Busch - 2011 - Agriculture and Human Values 28 (3):345-352.
    In recent years, we have witnessed three parallel and intertwined trends: First, food retail and processing firms have embraced private standards, usually with some form of third party certification employed to verify adherence to those standards. Second, firms have increasingly aligned themselves with, as opposed to fighting off, environmental, fair trade, and other NGOs. Third, firms have embraced supply chain management as a strategy for increasing profits and market share. Together, these trends are part and parcel of the neoliberal blurring (...)
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  2.  77
    Introduction to Symposium on Private Agrifood Governance: Values, Shortcomings and Strategies. [REVIEW]Doris Fuchs, Agni Kalfagianni, Jennifer Clapp & Lawrence Busch - 2011 - Agriculture and Human Values 28 (3):335-344.
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  3.  7
    Forthcoming. Introduction to Symposium-Private Food Governance: Values, Shortcomings and Alternatives.Doris Fuchs, Agni Kalfagianni, Jennifer Clapp & Lawrence Busch - 2011 - Agriculture and Human Values 28 (3):335-344.
  4.  21
    Virgil, Vigilance, and Voice: Agrifood Ethics in an Age of Globalization. [REVIEW]Lawrence Busch - 2003 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (5):459-477.
    Some 2000 years ago, Virgil wroteThe Georgics, a political tract on Romanagriculture in the form of a poem. Today, as aresult of rising global trade in food andagricultural products, growing economicconcentration, the merging of food andpharmacy, chronic obesity in the midst ofhunger, and new disease and pest vectors, weare in need of a new Georgics that addressesthe two key issues of our time: vigilance andvoice. On the one hand, vigilance must becentral to a new Georgics. Enforceablestandards for food safety, food (...)
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  5.  23
    Inquiry for the Public Good: Democratic Participation in Agricultural Research.Gerad Middendorf & Lawrence Busch - 1997 - Agriculture and Human Values 14 (1):45-57.
    In recent decades, constituenciesserved by land-grant agricultural research haveexperienced significant demographic and politicalchanges, yet most research institutions have not fullyresponded to address the concerns of a changingclientele base. Thus, we have seen continuingcontroversies over technologies produced by land-grantagricultural research. While a number of scholars havecalled for a more participatory agricultural scienceestablishment, we understand little about the processof enhancing and institutionalizing participation inthe US agricultural research enterprise. We firstexamine some of the important issues surroundingcitizen participation in science and technologypolicy. We then (...)
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  6.  13
    Governance in the Age of Global Markets: Challenges, Limits, and Consequences.Lawrence Busch - 2014 - Agriculture and Human Values 31 (3):513-523.
    We live in an age defined in large part by various facets of neoliberalism. In particular, the market world has impinged on virtually every aspect of food and agriculture. Moreover, most nation-states and many international governance bodies incorporate aspects of neoliberal perspectives. Multi-stakeholder initiatives, with their own standards, certifications, and accreditations are evidence of both the continuing hegemony of neoliberalism as well as various responses to it. Importantly, to date even attempts to limit neoliberal hegemony through MSIs have been largely (...)
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  7.  2
    Looking in the Wrong (La)Place? The Promise and Perils of Becoming Big Data.Lawrence Busch - 2017 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 42 (4):657-678.
    Laplace once argued that if one could “comprehend all the forces by which nature is animated,” it would be possible to predict the future and explain the past. The advent of analysis of large-scale data sets has been accompanied by newfound concerns about “Laplace’s Demon” as it relates to certain fields of science as well as management, evaluation, and audit. I begin by asking how statistical data are constructed, illustrating the hermeneutic acts necessary to create a variable. These include attributing (...)
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  8.  15
    Commentary on “Ever Since Hightower: The Politics of Agricultural Research Activism in the Molecular Age”. [REVIEW]Lawrence Busch - 2005 - Agriculture and Human Values 22 (3):285-288.
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  9.  18
    Irony, Tragedy, and Temporality in Agricultural Systems, or, How Values and Systems Are Related.Lawrence Busch - 1989 - Agriculture and Human Values 6 (4):4-11.
    In the last decade the systems approach to agricultural research has begun to subsume the older reductionist approaches. However, proponents of the systems approach often accept without critical examination a number of features that were inherited from previously accepted approaches. In particular, supporters of the systems approach frequently ignore the ironies and tragedies that are a part of all human endeavors. They may also fail to consider that all actual systems are temporally and spatially bounded. By incorporating such features into (...)
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  10.  3
    Rites of Passage: Constructing Quality in a Commodity Subsector.Keiko Tanaka & Lawrence Busch - 1996 - Science, Technology and Human Values 21 (1):3-27.
    This article extends the concept of symmetry to ethics. Using the case of canola in Canada, the authors argue that grades and standards simultaneously subject humans and nonhumans to rites of passage that test their "goodness. " Then, they further develop a tentative typology of standards. The authors argue that these standards allow something resembling the neoclassical market to be established, create the conditions for economic analysis, and allocate power among human actors.
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  11.  25
    On the Peculiarity of Standards: A Reply to Thompson.Lawrence Busch & Kyle Powys Whyte - 2012 - Philosophy and Technology 25 (2):243-248.
    Abstract As Paul B. Thompson suggests in his recent seminal paper, “‘There’s an App for That’: Technical Standards and Commodification by Technological Means,” technical standards restructure property (and other social) relations. He concludes with the claim that the development of technical standards of commodification can serve purposes with bad effects such as “the rise of the factory system and the deskilling of work” or progressive effects such as how “technical standards for animal welfare… discipline the unwanted consequences of market forces.” (...)
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  12.  2
    Classifying, Constructing, and Identifying Life: Standards as Transformations of “The Biological”. [REVIEW]Brian Wynne, Lawrence Busch, Ruth McNally, Emma K. Frow, Rebecca Ellis, Claire Waterton & Adrian Mackenzie - 2013 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 38 (5):701-722.
    Recent accounts of “the biological” emphasize its thoroughgoing transformation. Accounts of biomedicalization, biotechnology, biopower, biocapital, and bioeconomy tend to agree that twentieth- and twenty-first-century life sciences transform the object of biology, the biological. Amidst so much transformation, we explore attempts to stabilize the biological through standards. We ask: how do standards handle the biological in transformation? Based on ethnographic research, the article discusses three contemporary postgenomic standards that classify, construct, or identify biological forms: the Barcoding of Life Initiative, the BioBricks (...)
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  13. What Can Nanotechnology Learn From Biotechnology?Lawrence Busch & John R. Lloyd - 2008 - In Kenneth H. David & Paul B. Thompson (eds.), What Can Nanotechnology Learn From Biotechnology?: Social and Ethical Lessons for Nanoscience From the Debate Over Agrifood Biotechnology and Gmos. Elsevier/Academic Press.
     
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  14.  21
    Agriculture Policy: Issues for the '80s and Beyond. [REVIEW]Lawrence Busch & William B. Lacy - 1984 - Agriculture and Human Values 1 (1):5-9.
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  15.  16
    Nanotechnologies, Food, and Agriculture: Next Big Thing or Flash in the Pan? [REVIEW]Lawrence Busch - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):215-218.
    The advent of the new nanotechnologies has been heralded by government, media, and many in the scientific community as the next big thing. Within the agricultural sector research is underway on a wide variety of products ranging from distributed intelligence in orchards, to radio frequency identification devices, to animal diagnostics, to nanofiltered food products. But the nano-revolution (if indeed there is a revolution at all) appears to be taking a turn quite different from the biotechnology revolution of two decades ago. (...)
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  16.  18
    Agricultural Biotechnology Research: Practices, Consequences, and Policy Recommendations. [REVIEW]William B. Lacy, Laura R. Lacy & Lawrence Busch - 1988 - Agriculture and Human Values 5 (3):3-14.
    This paper reviews current trends in the development of agricultural biotechnology, including (1) the recent and potential biotechnology products and processes in the plant, animal and food sciences, and (2) the enormous increase in Federal and State government and industrial investments in biotechnology research. Next we analyze the impacts and possible consequences of agricultural biotechnology for public and private agricultural research and for the structure and nature of the food system in this country and around the world. We conclude with (...)
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  17.  11
    Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Lawrence Busch - 1997 - Agriculture and Human Values 14 (2):191-191.
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  18.  7
    What Kind of Agriculture? What Might Science Deliver?Lawrence Busch - 2009 - Natures Sciences Sociétés 17 (3):241-247.
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