Results for 'Cognitive control'

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  1. The Cognitive Control of Emotion.K. N. Ochsner & J. J. Gross - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (5):242-249.
    The capacity to control emotion is important for human adaptation. Questions about the neural bases of emotion regulation have recently taken on new importance, as functional imaging studies in humans have permitted direct investigation of control strategies that draw upon higher cognitive processes difficult to study in nonhumans. Such studies have examined (1) controlling attention to, and (2) cognitively changing the meaning of, emotionally evocative stimuli. These two forms of emotion regulation depend upon interactions between prefrontal and (...)
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  2.  30
    Conscious Cognitive Effort in Cognitive Control.Joshua Shepherd - forthcoming - WIREs Cognitive Science.
    Cognitive effort is thought to be familiar in everyday life, ubiquitous across multiple variations of task and circumstance, and integral to cost/benefit computations that are themselves central to the proper functioning of cognitive control. In particular, cognitive effort is thought to be closely related to the assessment of cognitive control’s costs. I argue here that the construct of cognitive effort, as it is deployed in cognitive psychology and neuroscience, is problematically unclear. The (...)
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  3.  64
    Cognitive Control, Hierarchy, and the Rostro–Caudal Organization of the Frontal Lobes.David Badre - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (5):193-200.
  4. Cognitive Control: Componential or Emergent?Richard P. Cooper - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):598-613.
    The past 25 years have witnessed an increasing awareness of the importance of cognitive control in the regulation of complex behavior. It now sits alongside attention, memory, language, and thinking as a distinct domain within cognitive psychology. At the same time it permeates each of these sibling domains. This introduction reviews recent work on cognitive control in an attempt to provide a context for the fundamental question addressed within this topic: Is cognitive control (...)
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  5. Cognitive Control: Easy to Identify But Hard to Define.J. Bruce Morton, Fredrick Ezekiel & Heather A. Wilk - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):212-216.
    Cognitive control is easy to identify in its effects, but difficult to grasp conceptually. This creates somewhat of a puzzle: Is cognitive control a bona fide process or an epiphenomenon that merely exists in the mind of the observer? The topiCS special edition on cognitive control presents a broad set of perspectives on this issue and helps to clarify central conceptual and empirical challenges confronting the field. Our commentary provides a summary of and critical (...)
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  6.  60
    Moral Judgement and Moral Progress: The Problem of Cognitive Control.Michael Klenk & Hanno Sauer - 2021 - Philosophical Psychology 34 (7):938-961.
    We propose a fundamental challenge to the feasibility of moral progress: most extant theories of progress, we will argue, assume an unrealistic level of cognitive control people must have over their moral judgments for moral progress to occur. Moral progress depends at least in part on the possibility of individual people improving their moral cognition to eliminate the pernicious influence of various epistemically defective biases and other distorting factors. Since the degree of control people can exert over (...)
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  7.  7
    Cognitive Control Ability Mediates Prediction Costs in Monolinguals and Bilinguals.Megan Zirnstein, Janet G. van Hell & Judith F. Kroll - 2018 - Cognition 176:87-106.
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  8.  10
    Cognitive Control As a Double-Edged Sword.Tarek Amer, Karen L. Campbell & Lynn Hasher - 2016 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 20 (12):905-915.
  9. Attention and Cognitive Control.Michael I. Posner & C. R. R. Snyder - 1975 - In Robert L. Solso (ed.), Information Processing and Cognition: The Loyola Symposium. Lawrence Erlbaum.
  10.  14
    Cognitive Control Over Learning: Creating, Clustering, and Generalizing Task-Set Structure.Anne G. E. Collins & Michael J. Frank - 2013 - Psychological Review 120 (1):190-229.
  11. Supra-Personal Cognitive Control and Metacognition.Nicholas Shea, Annika Boldt, Dan Bang, Nick Yeung, Cecilia Heyes & Chris D. Frith - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (4):186–193.
    The human mind is extraordinary in its ability not merely to respond to events as they unfold but also to adapt its own operation in pursuit of its agenda. This ‘cognitive control’ can be achieved through simple interactions among sensorimotor processes, and through interactions in which one sensorimotor process represents a property of another in an implicit, unconscious way. So why does the human mind also represent properties of cognitive processes in an explicit way, enabling us to (...)
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  12. The Variable Nature of Cognitive Control: A Dual Mechanisms Framework.Todd S. Braver - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (2):106-113.
  13.  34
    Conflict Monitoring and Cognitive Control.Matthew M. Botvinick, Todd S. Braver, Deanna M. Barch, Cameron S. Carter & Jonathan D. Cohen - 2001 - Psychological Review 108 (3):624-652.
  14.  78
    Cognitive Control: Componential and Yet Emergent.Ion Juvina - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):242-246.
    In this commentary, I will argue that the componential and emergent views of cognitive control as defined by Cooper (2010) do not necessarily oppose each other, and I will try to make a case for their interdependence. First, I will use the construct of cognitive inhibition—one of the main componential control functions mentioned in the target articles—to illustrate my line of reasoning. Then, I will comment on how some of the target articles, each from a different (...)
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  15.  63
    Considering the Role of Cognitive Control in Expert Performance.John Toner, Barbara Gail Montero & Aidan Moran - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (4):1127-1144.
    Dreyfus and Dreyfus’ influential phenomenological analysis of skill acquisition proposes that expert performance is guided by non-cognitive responses which are fast, effortless and apparently intuitive in nature. Although this model has been criticised for over-emphasising the role that intuition plays in facilitating skilled performance, it does recognise that on occasions a form of ‘detached deliberative rationality’ may be used by experts to improve their performance. However, Dreyfus and Dreyfus see no role for calculative problem solving or deliberation when performance (...)
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  16.  28
    Cognitive Control Acts Locally.Wim Notebaert & Tom Verguts - 2008 - Cognition 106 (2):1071-1080.
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  17.  21
    Cognitive Control: Dynamic, Sustained, and Voluntary Influences.MaryBeth Knight - unknown
    The cost of incongruent stimuli is reduced when conflict is expected. This series of experiments tested whether this improved performance is due to repetition priming or to enhanced cognitive control. Using a paradigm in which Word and Number Stroop alternated every trial, Experiment 1 assessed dynamic trial-to-trial changes. Incongruent trials led to task-specific reduction of conflict (trial n ϩ 2) without cross-task modulation (trial n ϩ 1), but this was fully explained by repetition priming. In contrast, an increased (...)
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  18.  12
    Cognitive Control and Flexibility in the Context of Stress and Depressive Symptoms: The Cognitive Control and Flexibility Questionnaire.Robert L. Gabrys, Nassim Tabri, Hymie Anisman & Kimberly Matheson - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
  19.  19
    Cognitive Control in the Self-Regulation of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior.Jude Buckley, Jason D. Cohen, Arthur F. Kramer, Edward McAuley & Sean P. Mullen - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  20.  9
    The Cognitive Control of Eating and Body Weight: It’s More Than What You “Think”.Terry L. Davidson, Sabrina Jones, Megan Roy & Richard J. Stevenson - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
  21.  11
    Cognitive Control and Ruminative Responses to Stress: Understanding the Different Facets of Cognitive Control.Bita Zareian, Jessica Wilson & Joelle LeMoult - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Rumination has been linked to the onset and course of depression. Theoretical models and empirical evidence suggest that deficits controlling negative material in working memory underlie rumination. However, we do not know which component of cognitive control contributes most to rumination, and whether different components predict the more maladaptive versus the more adaptive forms of rumination. We aimed to advance theory and research by examining the contribution of different facets of cognitive control to the level and (...)
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  22. Cognitive Control Processes and Hypnosis.Tobias Egner & Amir Raz - 2007 - In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. pp. 29-50.
  23.  23
    Cognitive Control, Cognitive Reserve, and Memory in the Aging Bilingual Brain.Angela Grant, Nancy A. Dennis & Ping Li - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  24.  33
    The Intrinsic Cost of Cognitive Control.Wouter Kool & Matthew Botvinick - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (6):661-698.
    Kurzban and colleagues carry forward an important contemporary movement in cognitive control research, tending away from resource-based models and toward a framework focusing on motivation or value. However, their specific proposal, centering on opportunity costs, appears problematic. We favor a simpler view, according to which the exertion of cognitive control carries intrinsic subjective costs.
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  25. The Evolution of Cognitive Control.Dietrich Stout - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):614-630.
    One of the key challenges confronting cognitive science is to discover natural categories of cognitive function. Of special interest is the unity or diversity of cognitive control mechanisms. Evolutionary history is an underutilized resource that, together with neuropsychological and neuroscientific evidence, can help to provide a biological ground for the fractionation of cognitive control. Comparative evidence indicates that primate brain evolution has produced dissociable mechanisms for external action control and internal self-regulation, but that (...)
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  26.  89
    Towards an Ontology of Cognitive Control.Agatha Lenartowicz, Donald J. Kalar, Eliza Congdon & Russell A. Poldrack - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):678-692.
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  27.  8
    Cognitive Control Across Adolescence: Dynamic Adjustments and Mind-Wandering.Máté Gyurkovics, Tom Stafford & Liat Levita - 2020 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 149 (6):1017-1031.
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  28.  41
    Enhanced Conflict-Driven Cognitive Control by Emotional Arousal, Not by Valence.Qinghong Zeng, Senqing Qi, Miaoyun Li, Shuxia Yao, Cody Ding & Dong Yang - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (6):1083-1096.
    Emotion is widely agreed to have two dimensions, valence and arousal. Few studies have explored the effect of emotion on conflict adaptation by considering both of these, which could have dissociate influence. The present study aimed to fill the gap as to whether emotional valence and arousal would exert dissociable influence on conflict adaptation. In the experiments, we included positive, neutral, and negative conditions, with comparable arousal between positive and negative conditions. Both positive and negative conditions have higher arousal than (...)
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  29.  15
    Cognitive Control of Emotional Distraction – Valence-Specific or General?Elisa Straub, Andrea Kiesel & David Dignath - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 34 (4):807-821.
    Emotional information captures attention due to privileged processing. Consequently, performance in cognitive tasks declines. Therefore, shielding current goals fro...
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  30.  9
    Cognitive Control in Action: Tracking the Dynamics of Rule Switching in 5- to 8-Year-Olds and Adults.Christopher D. Erb, Jeff Moher, Joo-Hyun Song & David M. Sobel - 2017 - Cognition 164:163-173.
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  31.  21
    Regulating Cognitive Control Through Approach-Avoidance Motor Actions.Severine Koch, Rob W. Holland & Ad van Knippenberg - 2008 - Cognition 109 (1):133-142.
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  32.  98
    Defining an Ontology of Cognitive Control Requires Attention to Component Interactions.David Badre - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):217-221.
    Cognitive control is not only componential, but those components may interact in complicated ways in the service of cognitive control tasks. This complexity poses a challenge for developing an ontological description, because the mapping may not be direct between our task descriptions and true component differences reflected in indicators. To illustrate this point, I discuss two examples: (a) the relationship between adaptive gating and working memory and (b) the recent evidence for a control hierarchy. From (...)
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  33.  8
    Cognitive Control and Capacity for Prospective Memory in Complex Dynamic Environments.Russell James Boag, Luke Strickland, Andrew Heathcote, Andrew Neal & Shayne Loft - 2019 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 148 (12):2181-2206.
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  34. Cognitive Control: Social Evolution and Emotional Regulation.Matt J. Rossano - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):238-241.
    This commentary argues that theories of cognitive control risk being incomplete unless they incorporate social/emotional factors. Social factors very likely played a critical role in the evolution of human cognitive control abilities, and emotional states are the primary regulatory mechanisms of cognitive control.
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    The Computational and Neural Basis of Cognitive Control: Charted Territory and New Frontiers.Matthew M. Botvinick - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (6):1249-1285.
    Cognitive control has long been one of the most active areas of computational modeling work in cognitive science. The focus on computational models as a medium for specifying and developing theory predates the PDP books, and cognitive control was not one of the areas on which they focused. However, the framework they provided has injected work on cognitive control with new energy and new ideas. On the occasion of the books' anniversary, we review (...)
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  36.  41
    Emotional Foundations of Cognitive Control.Michael Inzlicht, Bruce D. Bartholow & Jacob B. Hirsh - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (3):126-132.
  37.  13
    Cognitive Control of Episodic Memory in Schizophrenia: Differential Role of Dorsolateral and Ventrolateral Prefrontal Cortex.John D. Ragland, Charan Ranganath, Joshua Phillips, Megan A. Boudewyn, Ann M. Kring, Tyler A. Lesh, Debra L. Long, Steven J. Luck, Tara A. Niendam, Marjorie Solomon, Tamara Y. Swaab & Cameron S. Carter - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  38.  13
    Cognitive Control Over Visual Motion Processing – Are Children With ADHD Especially Compromised? A Pilot Study of Flanker Task Event-Related Potentials.Bettina Lange-Malecki, Stefan Treue, Aribert Rothenberger & Björn Albrecht - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  39.  5
    Cognitive Control and the Non-Conscious Regulation of Health Behavior.Amanda L. Rebar, Andrea M. Loftus & Martin S. Hagger - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  40.  7
    Cognitive Control.Kenneth R. Hammond & David A. Summers - 1972 - Psychological Review 79 (1):58-67.
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  41.  7
    Cognitive Control Under Social Influence in Baboons.Pascal Huguet, Isabelle Barbet, Clément Belletier, Jean-Marc Monteil & Joël Fagot - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (6):2067-2073.
  42. Can Cognitive Control and Attentional Biases Explain More of the Variance in Depressive Symptoms Than Behavioral Processes? A Path Analysis Approach.Audrey Krings, Jessica Simon, Arnaud Carré & Sylvie Blairy - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    BackgroundThis study explored the proportion of variance in depressive symptoms explained by processes targeted by BA, and processes targeted by cognitive control training.MethodsFive hundred and twenty adults were recruited. They completed a spatial cueing task as a measure of attentional biases and a cognitive task as a measure of cognitive control and completed self-report measures of activation, behavioral avoidance, anticipatory pleasure, brooding, and depressive symptoms. With path analysis models, we explored the relationships between these predictors (...)
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  43.  3
    Cognitive Control Constrains Memory Attributions.Colleen M. Kelley & Larry L. Jacoby - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
    Cognitive control constrains retrieval processing and so restricts what comes to mind as input to the attribution system. We review evidence that older adults, patients with Alzheimer's disease, and people with traumatic brain injury exert less cognitive control during retrieval, and so are susceptible to memory misattributions in the form of dramatic levels of false remembering.
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  44. The Other Side of Cognitive Control: Can a Lack of Cognitive Control Benefit Language and Cognition?Evangelia G. Chrysikou, Jared M. Novick, John C. Trueswell & Sharon L. Thompson-Schill - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):253-256.
    Cognitive control refers to the regulation of mental activity to support flexible cognition across different domains. Cragg and Nation (2010) propose that the development of cognitive control in children parallels the development of language abilities, particularly inner speech. We suggest that children’s late development of cognitive control also mirrors their limited ability to revise misinterpretations of sentence meaning. Moreover, we argue that for certain tasks, a tradeoff between bottom-up (data-driven) and top-down (rule-based) thinking may (...)
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  45.  12
    Cognitive Control in Romantic Love: The Roles of Infatuation and Attachment in Interference and Adaptive Cognitive Control.Sandra J. E. Langeslag & Henk van Steenbergen - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 34 (3):596-603.
    ABSTRACTBesides physiological, behavioural, and affective effects, romantic love also has cognitive effects. In this study, we tested whether individual differences in infatuation and/or attachment level predict impaired interference control even in the absence of a love booster procedure, and whether individual differences in attachment level predict reduced adaptive cognitive control as measured by conflict adaptation and post-error slowing. Eighty-three young adults who had recently fallen in love completed a Stroop-like task, which yielded reliable indices of interference (...)
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  46.  15
    Cognitive Control, Dynamic Salience, and the Imperative Toward Computational Accounts of Neuromodulatory Function.Christopher Michael Warren, Peter Richard Murphy & Sander Nieuwenhuis - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
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  47. Cognitive Control Deficits in Children With Subthreshold Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.Caiqi Chen, Zhuangyang Li, Xiqin Liu, Yongling Pan & Tingting Wu - 2022 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 16.
    Subthreshold Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder is defined as a neurobiological condition with some core inattentive or hyperactive/impulsive symptoms of ADHD which do not meet the full diagnosis clinically. Although it has been well documented that deficits in cognitive control, a high-level cognitive construct closely related to attention, are frequently found among children with ADHD, whether subthreshold ADHD is also associated with similar deficits remains unclear. In this study, we examined the attention functions and the cognitive control capacity (...)
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  48. The Evolutionary Origins of Cognitive Control.Thomas T. Hills - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):231-237.
    The question of domain-specific versus domain-general processing is an ongoing source of inquiry surrounding cognitive control. Using a comparative evolutionary approach, Stout (2010) proposed two components of cognitive control: coordinating hierarchical action plans and social cognition. This article reports additional molecular and experimental evidence supporting a domain-general attentional process coordinating hierarchical action plans, with the earliest such control processing originating in the capacity of dynamic foraging behaviors—predating the vertebrate-invertebrate divergence (c. 700 million years ago). Further (...)
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  49.  2
    Cognitive Control in Suicide Ideators and Suicide Attempters.Silje Støle Brokke, Nils Inge Landrø & Vegard Øksendal Haaland - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    There is a need to understand more of the risk factors involved in the process from suicide ideation to suicide attempt. Cognitive control processes may be important factors in assessing vulnerability to suicide. A version of the Stroop procedure, Delis–Kaplan Executive Function System Color–Word Interference Test and Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function were used in this study to test attention control and cognitive shift, as well as to assess everyday executive function of 98 acute suicidal (...)
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  50.  7
    Cognitive Control and Cortisol Response to Stress in Generalised Anxiety Disorder: A Study of Working Memory Capacity with Negative and Neutral Distractors.Joelle LeMoult, Randi E. McCabe, Atayeh Hamedani & K. Lira Yoon - 2019 - Cognition and Emotion 34 (4):800-806.
    We investigated the association between cognitive control and individual differences in cortisol response to stress in participants with generalised anxiety disorder and in never-disordered c...
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