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  1. ᾽Εκπύρωσις and the Goodness of God in Cleanthes.Ricardo Salles - 2005 - Phronesis 50 (1):56 - 78.
    The ἐκπύρωσις, or world's conflagration, followed by the restoration of an identical world seems to go against the rationality of the Stoic god. The aim of this paper is to show that Cleanthes, the second head of the School, can avoid this paradox. According to Cleanthes, the conflagration is an inevitable side-effect of the necessary means used by god to sustain the world. Given that this side-effect is contrary to god's sustaining activity, but unavoidable, god's rationality requires the restoration of (...)
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  • Ideal Intellectual Cognition in Timeaus 37 A 2- C 5.Klaus Corcilius - 2018 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 54.
    Plato's depiction of the world soul's cognitive activity in Timaeus 37 A 2‐C 5 offers a general account of intellectual cognition. He gives this account by describing the activity of an ideal cognitive agent, involving the very same comparative mechanism that governs human intellectual activity, namely, the active production of a propositional grasp of sameness and difference that things have in relation to each other in several respects. Plato depicts the world soul's intellectual activity as entirely devoid of immediate forms (...)
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  • Colloquium 7: Eudaimonism, Divinity, and Rationality in Greek Ethics1.A. A. Long - 2004 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 19 (1):123-143.
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  • Nature and Utopia in Epictetus’ Theory of Oikeiōsis.Sara Magrin - 2018 - Phronesis 63 (3):293-350.
    _ Source: _Volume 63, Issue 3, pp 293 - 350 It is widely agreed that there is a gap between the personal and the social ethics of the Stoics due to the difficulty of harmonizing personal and social _oikeiōsis_. By reconstructing Epictetus’ theory of _oikeiōsis_, this paper aims to show that, in his ethics, there is no such gap, and this for two reasons: first, his account of social _oikeiōsis_ is not meant to ground his social ethics; second, his theory (...)
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  • Philosophy and Life in Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy: Three Aspects.Richard Sorabji - 2014 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 74:45-74.
    Philosophy, in the ancient Graeco-Roman world, and in various other cultures too, was typically thought of as, among other things, bearing on how to live. Questions of how to live may now be considered by some as merely one optional specialism among others, but Derek Parfit for one, we shall see, rightly treats implications for how to live as flowing naturally from metaphysical theories. In the hope of showing something about the ancient Graeco-Roman tradition as a whole, I shall speak (...)
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  • God and Cosmos in Stoicism. [REVIEW]Daniel Vázquez - 2011 - Dianoia 56 (66):200-210.
  • Les Stoïciens Et Platon – Monistes Ou Dualistes?Vladimír Mikeš - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (2):299-323.
    The Stoics’ way of presenting principles – the active and the passive – is ambiguous because they say that principles are two while also suggesting that they are inseparable and thus interdependent. This ambiguity cannot be resolved in favour of one or the other side of the dilemma, as is shown by analysis of two possible models of the relations among principles – a causal and a categories-based model. This ambiguity is rather a necessary consequence of the Stoic view of (...)
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  • Nature and Knowledge in Stoicism: On the Ordinariness of the Stoic Sage.Irene Liu - 2008 - Apeiron 41 (4):247-276.
  • Stoicism.Dirk Baltzly - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Stoicism was one of the new philosophical movements of the Hellenistic period. The name derives from the porch (stoa poikilê) in the Agora at Athens decorated with mural paintings, where the members of the school congregated, and their lectures were held. Unlike ‘epicurean,’ the sense of the English adjective ‘stoical’ is not utterly misleading with regard to its philosophical origins. The Stoics did, in fact, hold that emotions like fear or envy (or impassioned sexual attachments, or passionate love of anything (...)
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