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Summary This section includes works on Cleanthes of Assos, the second head of the Athenian Stoa
Key works The ancient evidence for Cleanthes is in volume 1 of von Arnim 1903-24. His Hymn to Zeus is edited translated and discussed in Thom 2005.
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18 found
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  1. The Soul and Personal Identity in Early Stoicism: Two Theories?Aiste Celkyte - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (4):463-486.
    Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print. This paper is dedicated to exploring the alleged difference between Cleanthes’ and Chrysippus’ accounts of the post-mortal survival of the souls and the conceptions of personal identity that these accounts underpin. I argue that while Cleanthes conceptualised the personal identity as grounded in the rational soul, Chrysippus conceptualised it as an embodied rational soul. I also suggest that this difference between the two early Stoics might have been due to Chrysippus' metaphysical commitments arising from his (...)
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  2. Musonius Rufus, Cleanthes, and the Stoic Community at Rome.Benjamin Harriman - 2020 - Elenchos: Rivista di Studi Sul Pensiero Antico 41 (1):71-104.
    Surprisingly little attention has been devoted to Musonius Rufus, a noted teacher and philosopher in first–century CE Rome, despite ample evidence for his impact in the period. This paper attempts to situate Musonius in relation to his philosophical predecessors in order to clarify both the contemporary status of the Stoic tradition and the value of engaging with the central figures of that school’s history. I make the case for seeing Cleanthes as a particularly prominent predecessor for Musonius and reaffirm the (...)
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  3. Disjunctions and Natural Philosophy in Marcus Aurelius.Benjamin Harriman - 2019 - Classical Quarterly 69 (2):858-879.
    In his Meditations, Marcus Aurelius repeatedly presents a disjunction between two conceptions of the natural world. Either the universe is ruled by providence or there are atoms. At 4.3, we find perhaps its most succinct statement: ἀνανεωσάμενος τὸ διεζευγμένον τό⋅ ἤτοι πρόνοια ἢ ἄτομοι. The formulation of the disjunction differs; at 7.32, being composed of atoms is contrasted with a stronger sort of unity that may survive death. In 10.6 and 11.18 Marcus simply offers φύσις in opposition. On the surface, (...)
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  4. Literature (J.C.) Thom Cleanthes' Hymn to Zeus. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2005. Pp. Xii + 207. 64. 3161486609.Richard Hunter - 2007 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:167-.
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  5. Stoic Theology: Proofs for the Existence of the Cosmic God and of the Traditional Gods: Including a Commentary on Cleanthes' Hymn on Zeus.P. A. Meijer - 2007 - Eburon.
    Zeno's so-called proofs of divine existence -- Zeno and the traditional gods: a serious problem -- Cleanthes' proofs -- Cleanthes and the traditional gods -- Chrysippus' contribution -- Chrysippus and the traditional gods -- Other Stoic proofs -- Other (Stoic?) arguments in Sextus -- Polemics against the arguments pro the existence of God(s) -- Abolishing the gods leads to odd consequence: the atopical arguments pro the existence of the gods -- The counter-arguments -- Carneades and the data of Sextus and (...)
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  6. 'Eκπvρωσiσ and the Goodness of God in Cleanthes.Ricardo Salles - 2005 - Phronesis 50 (1):56-78.
    The ´, or world's con flagration, followed by the restoration of an identical world seems to go against the rationality of the Stoic god. The aim of this paper is to show that Cleanthes, the second head of the School, can avoid this paradox. According to Cleanthes, the con flagration is an inevitable side-effect of the necessary means used by god to sustain the world. Given that this side-effect is contrary to god's sustaining activity, but unavoidable, god's rationality requires the (...)
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  7. ᾽Εκπύρωσις and the Goodness of God in Cleanthes.Ricardo Salles - 2005 - Phronesis 50 (1):56 - 78.
    The ἐκπύρωσις, or world's conflagration, followed by the restoration of an identical world seems to go against the rationality of the Stoic god. The aim of this paper is to show that Cleanthes, the second head of the School, can avoid this paradox. According to Cleanthes, the conflagration is an inevitable side-effect of the necessary means used by god to sustain the world. Given that this side-effect is contrary to god's sustaining activity, but unavoidable, god's rationality requires the restoration of (...)
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  8. 'Ekappapiupsi'rhoomegasigmaiotazeta and the Goodness of God in Cleanthes.Ricardo Salles - 2005 - Phronesis 50 (1):56-78.
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  9. Stoa.Theodor Ebert - 2004 - In Ansgar Beckermann & Dominik Perler (eds.), Klassiker der Philosopie heute. Stuttgart: Reclam. pp. 59-79.
    The paper gives an overall view of the history of the Stoa and its main achievements.
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  10. Logos et scala naturae dans le stoïcisme de Zénon et Cléanthe.Thomas Bénatouïl - 2002 - Elenchos 23 (2):297-331.
  11. Cleanthes.Author unknown - 2001 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  12. Los Estoicos Antiguos Zenón de Citio, Aristón de Quíos, Apolófanes, Hérilo de Calcedonia, Dionisio de Heraclea, Perseo de Citio, Cleantes, Esfero.Angel J. Cappelletti - 1996
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  13. Cleanthes, Fragments: Text and Commentary.Albert Tohru Watanabe - 1988 - Dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    This dissertation presents an updated collection of the fragments of Cleanthes. The last collection of these fragments was made by J. von Arnim in his Stoicorum Veterum Fragmenta . The last commentary on the fragments was that of Pearson . The present dissertation contains new fragments and full testimonia on Cleanthes. The text of the fragments have been made to conform with modern editions of the sources. Finally there is a commentary which incorporates the scholarship on Cleanthes since the time (...)
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  14. Two Studies in Greek Philosophy. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1963 - The Classical Review 13 (2):192-193.
  15. The Corn of Cleanthes.J. Tate - 1951 - The Classical Review 1 (02):88-.
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  16. Nicola Festa: I Frammenti Degli Stoiciantichi. Vol. Ii: Aristone — Apollofane—Erillo—Dionigi d'Eraclea—Perséo—Cleante—Sfero. Pp. 195. Bari: Laterza, 1935. Paper, L. 24. [REVIEW]F. H. Sandbach - 1935 - The Classical Review 49 (05):204-.
  17. Stoicorum Veterum Fragmenta.Hans Friedrich August von Arnim (ed.) - 1903-24 - Teubner.
  18. The Fragments of Zeno and Cleanthes, with Introduction and Explanatory Notes. An Essay Which Obtained the Hare Prize in the Year 1889. By A. C. Pearson, M.A., Late Scholar of Christ's College, Cambridge. London: C. J. Clay and Sons. 1891. [REVIEW]Harold N. Fowler - 1891 - The Classical Review 5 (10):479-480.