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Seiji Bito [12]S. Bito [4]
  1.  20
    A Report on Small Team Clinical Ethics Consultation Programmes in Japan.M. Fukuyama, A. Asai, K. Itai & S. Bito - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (12):858-862.
    Clinical ethics support, including ethics consultation, has become established in the field of medical practice throughout the world. This practice has been regarded as useful, most notably in the UK and the USA, in solving ethical problems encountered by both medical practitioners and those who receive medical treatment. In Japan, however, few services are available to respond to everyday clinical ethical issues, although a variety of difficult ethical problems arise daily in the medical field: termination of life support, euthanasia and (...)
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  2.  6
    Should We Aim to Create a Perfect Healthy Utopia? Discussions of Ethical Issues Surrounding the World of Project Itoh’s Harmony.Atsushi Asai, Taketoshi Okita, Motoki Ohnishi & Seiji Bito - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (6):3249-3270.
    To consider whether or not we should aim to create a perfect healthy utopia on Earth, we focus on the SF novel Harmony, written by Japanese writer Project Ito, and analyze various issues in the world established in the novel from a bioethical standpoint. In the world depicted in Harmony, preserving health and life is a top priority. Super-medicine is realized through highly advanced medical technologies. Citizens in Harmony are required to strictly control themselves to achieve perfect health and must (...)
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  3.  50
    Can Physicians' Judgments of Futility Be Accepted by Patients?: A Comparative Survey of Japanese Physicians and Laypeople.Yasuhiro Kadooka, Atsushi Asai & Seiji Bito - 2012 - BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):7.
    Back groundEmpirical surveys about medical futility are scarce relative to its theoretical assumptions. We aimed to evaluate the difference of attitudes between laypeople and physicians towards the issue.MethodsA questionnaire survey was designed. Japanese laypeople (via Internet) and physicians with various specialties (via paper-and-pencil questionnaire) were asked about whether they would provide potentially futile treatments for end-of-life patients in vignettes, important factors for judging a certain treatment futile, and threshold of quantitative futility which reflects the numerical probability that an act will (...)
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  4.  23
    Hope for the Best and Prepare for the Worst: Ethical Concerns Related to the Introduction of Healthcare Artificial Intelligence.Atsuchi Asai, Taketoshi Okita, Aya Enzo, Motoki Ohnishi & Seiji Bito - 2019 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 29 (2):64-70.
    Background: The introduction of healthcare AI to society as well as the clinical setting will improve individual health statuses and increase the possible medical choices. AI can be, however, regarded as a double-edged sword that might cause medically and socially undesirable situations. In this paper, we attempt to predict several negative situations that may be faced by healthcare professionals, patients and citizens in the healthcare setting, and our society as a whole. Discussion: We would argue that physicians abuse healthcare AI (...)
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  5.  1
    Discussions on Present Japanese Psychocultural-Social Tendencies as Obstacles to Clinical Shared Decision-Making in Japan.Seiji Bito, Taketoshi Okita & Atsushi Asai - 2022 - Asian Bioethics Review 14 (2):133-150.
    In Japan, where a prominent gap exists in what is considered a patient’s best interest between the medical and patient sides, appropriate decision-making can be difficult to achieve. In Japanese clinical settings, decision-making is considered an act of choice-making from multiple potential options. With many ethical dilemmas still remaining, establishing an appropriate decision-making process is an urgent task in modern Japanese healthcare. This paper examines ethical issues related to shared decision-making in clinical settings in modern Japan from the psychocultural-social perspective (...)
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  6. Japanese Healthcare Workers‟ Attitudes Towards Administering Futile Treatments: A Preliminary Interview-Based Study.Yasuhiro Kadooka, A. Asai, K. Aizawa & S. Bito - 2011 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 21 (4):131-135.
    In Japan, few studies and ethical debates have addressed medical futility, but articles suggesting the practice of such treatment exist. The present study aimed to explore attitudes about this by examining personal practical experiences of those who have been involved in judging treatments as futile. We employed a qualitative descriptive design with content analysis of semi-structured and focus group interviews with 11 Japanese physicians and 9 nurses of a university hospital in Japan. The interviews mined their practical experience to identify (...)
     
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  7.  35
    Defining Futile Life-Prolonging Treatments Through Neo-Socratic Dialogue.Kuniko Aizawa, Atsushi Asai & Seiji Bito - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):51.
    In Japan, people are negative towards life-prolonging treatments. Laws that regulate withholding or discontinuing life-prolonging treatments and advance directives do not exist. Physicians, however, view discontinuing life-prolonging treatments negatively due to fears of police investigations. Although ministerial guidelines were announced regarding the decision process for end-of-life care in 2007, a consensus could not be reached on the definition of end-of-life and conditions for withholding treatment. We established a forum for extended discussions and consensus building on this topic.
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  8.  17
    A Comparative Survey on Potentially Futile Treatments Between Japanese Nurses and Laypeople.Y. Kadooka, A. Asai, M. Fukuyama & S. Bito - 2014 - Nursing Ethics 21 (1):64-75.
  9.  3
    Physician Use of the Phrase “Due to Old Age” to Address Complaints of Elderly Symptoms in Japanese Medical Settings: The Merits and Drawbacks.Atsushi Asai, Taketoshi Okita, Masashi Tanaka, Seiji Bito & Motoki Ohnishi - 2022 - Clinical Ethics 17 (1):14-21.
    In everyday medical settings in Japan, physicians occasionally tell an elderly patient that their symptoms are “due to old age,” and there is some concern that patient care might be negatively impacted as a result. That said, as this phrase can have multiple connotations and meanings, there are certain instances in which the use of this phrase may not necessarily be indicative of ageism, or prejudice against the elderly. One of the goals in medical care is to address pain and (...)
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  10.  46
    Acculturation and End-of-Life Decision Making: Comparison of Japanese and Japanese-American Focus Groups.Seiji Bito, Shinji Matsumura, Marjorie Kagawa Singer, Lisa S. Meredith, Shunichi Fukuhara & Neil S. Wenger - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (5):251–262.
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  11. Perceptions of Interpersonal Relationships Held by Patients with Obstinate Disease.Atsushi Asai, Yugo Narita, Etsuyo Nishigaki, Seiji Bito & Taishu Masano - 2005 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 15 (1):32-34.
    The objective of this study was to reveal the problems related to interpersonal relationships which patients with obstinate diseases face, and consider the behavior, attitude and medical intervention that healthcare and healthcare-related professions should take in regards to these problems. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with patients with obstinate neurological diseases and observation of outpatient care was also conducted. Data were analyzed by qualitative content analysis. Patient diseases included Parkinson Disease , Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis , myasthenia gravis, spinocerebellar ataxia , (...)
     
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  12. Clinical Ethical Discussion 2: Should A Physician Withdraw Ventilation Support From A Patient With Respiratory Failure When The Patient Prefers Not To Undergo Tracheotomy?Seiji Bito, Kazuki Chiba & Atsushi Asai - 2003 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 13 (4):147-151.
     
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  13.  7
    The Application of Artificial Intelligence to the Medical Field: Report of a Qualitative Investigation.Taketoshi Okita, Atsushi Asai, Tsuyoshi Horie & Seiji Bito - 2020 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 30 (5):230-233.
    Progress in artificial intelligence technological innovation raises questions about the role of medical staff and the meaning of medical specialization. This study involved a qualitative survey of medical professionals and ordinary citizens to expand knowledge of this topic. A combination of Neo-Socratic Dialogue and Transfer Dialogue techniques, was used to acquire knowledge related to emerging forms of medical care and changing work demands after the implementation of AI, qualitatively analyzing the TD transcript only. Eleven subjects participated in two surveys. The (...)
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  14.  40
    Attitudes and Behaviors of Japanese Physicians Concerning Withholding and Withdrawal of Life-Sustaining Treatment for End-of-Life Patients: Results From an Internet Survey.Seiji Bito & Atsushi Asai - 2007 - BMC Medical Ethics 8 (1):1-9.
    Background Evidence concerning how Japanese physicians think and behave in specific clinical situations that involve withholding or withdrawal of medical interventions for end-of-life or frail elderly patients is yet insufficient. Methods To analyze decisions and actions concerning the withholding/withdrawal of life-support care by Japanese physicians, we conducted cross-sectional web-based internet survey presenting three scenarios involving an elderly comatose patient following a severe stroke. Volunteer physicians were recruited for the survey through mailing lists and medical journals. The respondents answered questions concerning (...)
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  15.  2
    Cross-Sectional Survey of Surrogate Decision-Making in Japanese Medical Practice.Asai Atsushi, Takethoshi Okita, Aya Enzo, Seiji Bito & Masashi Tanaka - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundInstances of surrogate decision-making are expected to increase with the rise in hospitalised older adults in Japan. Few large-scale studies have comprehensively examined the entire surrogate decision-making process. This study aimed to gather information to assess the current state of surrogate decision-making in Japan.MethodsA cross-sectional survey was conducted using online questionnaires. A total of 1000 surrogate decision-makers responded to the questionnaire. We examined the characteristics of surrogate decision-makers and patients, content of surrogate decision-making meeting regarding life-sustaining treatment between the doctors (...)
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